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Before You Quit Rest A Day

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Topics' started by howardd5, May 19, 2016.

  1. howardd5

    howardd5 Member

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    i have recently heard from a few walkers that they must leave the Camino for foot or knee problems , well sometimes it seems bad and you are in pain BUT sleep on it for a day or so and then make a decision. Some walkers decide on a strict timetable or are traveling with friends and feel if i had a real hard day or my feet are bloody , i should quit. When you remember all the effort , planning and yes $$$ you have invested ,why not lay up for a few days in an albergue and eat well , rest or see the local sights and perhaps you can go on ,maybe slowly , but its no race. you may miss your friends but i bet you will make new friends. Darrell
     
  2. Wily

    Wily Francés 2016; Portugués 2017; Inglés/Fisterra 2018

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    I have a friend who just two weeks ago was at the point of abandoning the Camino and heading home after less than a week. Foot and leg problems seemed to be too much. However, Howeard's advice above is excellent. Sleep on it. Rest a bit more. Don't make any decision to leave until you're in a good frame of mind. Even walking a day without a pack or taking a couple shorter days may be enough to think differently about leaving. My friend did, in fact, feel better the next day, took it a bit easier, and she has now finished her third week on the Camino.
     
  3. Jesse ramon

    Jesse ramon Guest

    Wily, you are a good adviser... One day I will walk the Camino de Santiago... Wish I was there. Godspeed to all
     
  4. YorkieUltraRunner

    YorkieUltraRunner Ultra Runner

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    Do whatever suits you as it is your Camink and you can do it fast or slow

    My idea now is that the best plan out here is no plan
     
  5. Dylan Price

    Dylan Price Member

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    My wife had a terrible blister thanks to a very wet day and a Comped gone rogue! We stopped for a rest day in Carrion to give it a chance to dry out and then I sent her forward by bus 40km and I walked to catch her 2 days later. That couple of days was enough for the blister to dry out and harden and then we used good cotton gauze and paper tape to cushion it. While not her last blister issue those rest days meant she was in a way better frame of mind to continue on while also a little disappointed that she had to take the bus.
     
  6. Tina-Marie Brownie

    Tina-Marie Brownie Well-Known Member

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    All good advice. I have yet to do my Camino and can imagine myself in a similar frame of mind if things go a bit astray - but this aussie girl is determined - so as per the excellent advice above - I will take rest, bus if I have to and try to think of it as a forced R & R situation. As I will be walking with a lady with terminal breast cancer I know that I have to be flexible, understanding and selfless on my first Camino - after all my friends health is the most important thing. I am wondering what Camino lessons are in stall for me :)
     
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  7. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    Hi Dylan and Tina Marie

    I think that the “Trick” is to leave yourself sufficient time to take account of eventualities like this (Also for minor illnesses and anything else that can come out of nowhere, bite you on the backside and slow you down).

    On my own last Camino I developed a knee problem; this stated about 550 miles into a 1.000 mile Camino, I was able to keep going with painkillers and anti-inflammatories for another 100 miles or so before I sought the help of the Spanish NHS, They kindly injected me with cortisone so that I could keep going, all be at a slower pace – The cortisone keep me going for another couple of hundred mile or so and then I was lucky enough to bump into a kind German Pilgrim who “Taped” my knee and this kept me going to Santiago de Compostela – However, I couldn’t have walked another single day !!

    I had left quite a few buffer days in my schedule and had originally planned to walk out to Muxia, but I slowed down to such an extent that Muxia went out of the window, BUT – I did walk (Well Hobbled) into Santiago de Compostela and completed my Camino


    The downside was that it took major surgery to repair my knee and it still isn’t anything like as good as it was – But I still wouldn’t have changed my plans, even If I had known that this would have happened !!!!



    Best Regards

    Rob

    Photo is of Freddy, the IMG_2772.JPG
    kind German Pilgrim who “Taped” my knee
     
  8. Wily

    Wily Francés 2016; Portugués 2017; Inglés/Fisterra 2018

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    For anyone who hasn't yet walked the Camino, build in some extra time into your trip as either rest days or as that buffer Rob refers to in case you need it. Although I walked it without rest days, I wouldn't do it again that way. Fortunately, no major problems or illness happened that would have thrown a real monkey-wrench into my plans. I did develop some world class blisters that, due to my schedule, I was forced to walk through. Eventually, they took care of themselves, but other issues could have been more problematic. What I did notice was an increasing fatigue that went with day after day walking. Your muscles get used to walking fairly quickly, but I was noticeably more tired as my month went on. I really did enjoy getting up and walking every morning. However, if I had listened to my body, I should have rested more than I did. We all find our pace on the Camino fairly quickly. Do listen to your body when it tells you to back off a little. My next Camino will consist of shorter walk days which I think both my body and spirit will appreciate.
     
  9. Daniel Bowater

    Daniel Bowater Member

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    Some good advice here! I met alot of pilgrims who locked themselves into tight schedules (some trying for 22 days!) that forced them to walk big distances every day. I was keeping up with the original walkers I started with from St Jean until I bruised my ankle near Pamplona. It felt like someone had hit me in the ankle with a hammer. But instead of giving up I chose to rest for one day there. It was one of the best decisions on my pilgrimage. It allowed me to join a tour of the Santa Maria cathedral near the albergue, and importantly rest up. The following day 90% of the pain was gone, and I continued. On arriving at Burgos I met up with the original guys from Saint Jean only to see they were buying painkillers. One was in hospital and the other two had developed serious knee problems. I would suggest having at least 3 rest days during the camino in private albergues. This way your body has genuine chances to heal even if there is no obvious sign of injury. Just my opinion of course.
     
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