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Beginners Advice Wanted!

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by FranO, Nov 6, 2017.

  1. FranO

    FranO New Member

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    We are four 60 year old who wish to do just 4 or 5 days as an introduction to the Camino. We are aiming to go in mid May.Can someone recommend an itinerary for us? Thank you!
     
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  2. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    If it were me, with 4 or 5 days, I would definitely opt for The Camino Ingles – It is a full Camino and you would qualify for your Compostela and, I believe this is a much better option than just doing a few days of a longer Camino :)


    My own trek notes for The Camino Ingles are at https://web.archive.org/web/20151031073518/http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/50192/bf/ - But as these are getting a bit dated, Laurie Ferris has just posted some up to date info – Scroll down the page to read it :)


    Another advantage of this Camino is that you can fly into Santiago de Compostela, catch a bus to Ferrol, walk your Camino and then fly back out of the same airport – So All Very Hassle Free :)


    Good Luck and Buen Camino

    Rob
     
  3. BROWNCOUNTYBOB

    BROWNCOUNTYBOB Well-Known Member

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    FranO, my wife and I are both 60 years old and just completed our second camino. If I only had four or five days to get a taste of the camino experience, I'd start in Pamplona. It's an easy place to get to (train ride from Madrid), a wonderful, historic city which you could easily spend one day there just enjoying the city. The first day's hike will include "alto de perdon" which is a highlight of the entire camino frances. Then subsequent days will possibly include overnights in Puente la Reina, Estella, Los Arcos and Logrono. Time permitting (if you can spend a day or two extra) might include Najera and Santo Domingo de la Calzada. The last few days include walks through vineyards and olive orchards in the region of La Rioja. Each is a nice town or city, have lots of albergues, lots of bars, restaurants, and historic places to tour. The weather should be mild during May and the trail not so overcrowded compared to the summer or fall (Sept) months. Buen Camino! Bob
     
  4. David Fletcher

    David Fletcher Member

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  5. anniem

    anniem Active Member

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    FranO I would completely agree with this. It is a lovely part of El Camino. Do't make the mistake of doing Sarria to Santiago. Yes, I know it finishes in Santiago and I know you receive your Compostela. But, I think it is one of the least attractive parts and of there is also the crowds...Buen Camino.
     
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  6. Greg Canning

    Greg Canning Well-Known Member

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    Hi FranO

    I would agree with the others. Try to avoid the Sarria to Santiago section. There is so much to the Camino and I think it would be a pity to just see that last piece. Rob and Bob have already made very good suggestions and it would be hard to disagree with either (and Pamplona is a lovely place to visit AND the people are just great).

    Because of time restrictions, my wife and I are walking the Camino Frances in sections from the beginning at St Jean all the way to Santiago.

    On our first trip (October 2015) we walked from St Jean Pied de Port to Puente de la Reine. It took four days. The first day was really challenging with the full 28 kms along the Route Napoleon, over the Pyrenees (1429 metres high) to Roncesvalles. It is a big climb and many people break it down into two days by stopping at Orisson (there are other options) but, and it really is a big BUT, it is a fantastic experience to walk over the Pyrenees and I would not have missed a step of it. The walk through the hills down through the Basque country with its rivers and small towns and churches is just magical and for me the best introduction to the Camino. I would highly recommend this as an option if you are relatively fit.

    Our second walk (Oct 2016) took us from Pamplona (we backtracked a bit) to Najera (just after Logrono) and once again the country side is stunning as you move from Navarre into La Rioja. This would encompass the walk Bob recommended and I agree it is very doable in 5 days.

    Our third walk took us from (March/April 2017) Najera to Fromista and the beginings of the Meseta. You pass through Burgos another fabulous city with a fantastic Cathedral. Once again beautiful scenery and people. This section took us 8 days.

    Then our last trip (September 2017) we walked from Fromista to one of my favourite cities on the Camino, Leon. This was a 5 day walk along the Meseta. Many people say it is monotonous and flat but I don't agree. There are some pretty flat and featureless sections but there are still some lovely parts and it is a relatively easy walk.

    So there you have it, pick any section and I am sure you will enjoy it but I would really strongly suggest the first or second sections. Imagine if you found that you love it and decide to come back and finish it, you would have the first part done :)

    Buen Camino

    Greg
     
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