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Best Carry On

Discussion in 'What equipment should you use and take' started by cruiser9608, Apr 10, 2017.

  1. cruiser9608

    cruiser9608 New Member

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    What brand and size is the best carry on backpack for walking the France route?
     
  2. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey Cruiser - I'm sure you'll get lots of opinions on your question. My preference is the Osprey. I use the Stratos 36L model. Although there is a new 2017 model out, I would suggest that you look at last year's pack because it is both front and top loading. The new pack has some great features as well, but I like that I can unzip the front to access what's inside.

    I'm just back from the Camino with the Osprey Stratos and there were no questions by the airlines (I flew on three different ones) as to it meeting the size requirements for carry on. Further, you won't need a pack larger than 36L for your Camino. To walk far, carry less! Buen Camino!
     
  3. James Orrock

    James Orrock Active Member

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    You're a better man than me, Wily. I want to travel real light on my Camino commencing late September but there's no way I could get all my gear into a 36 litre pack. I need to carry a spare pair of undies, shirts, shorts etc. You must have a device for scrunching your things into tight balls?
     
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  4. El Condor 2014

    El Condor 2014 Active Member Donating Member

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    I have done 2 Caminos and getting ready for my 3rd, I used an Osprey Talon 44 L, Very happy with it ! a little extra room so my food supplies (when required ) don't get all squashed up . I use two light weight compression bags for my clothing,
     
  5. Greg Canning

    Greg Canning Well-Known Member

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    At the risk of sounding like a parrot :) I have to agree with Wily. The Stratos 36 certainly works for me but it does mean that you need to be really tight on your packing and very strict with yourself as to what you need as opposed to what you "think" you might need (And I'm still learning that one).

    I also use Eagle Creek cubes. They are great light-weight compression bags which allow you get an awful lot into. I use one for my t-shirts, shorts and walking trousers and a smaller one for my underwear and socks. It also realy helps if you go for the technical materials in your clothing. They seem to be able to be compressed much more easily than cotton.

    Buen Camino

    Greg
     
  6. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey Greg - One of the great things anout this Forum is the amount of information and number of ideas that get shared. I wasn't aware of Eagle Creek cubes before your post. Although space wasn't a particular problem for me even in a 36L pack, I will definitely chech out these compression bags. Thanks.
     
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  7. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey James - I tell you, I did have extra clothes and still had room in my pack. If you haven't seen it yet, my gear list can be found on my blog at caminoportugues2017.blogspot.com. But, I was very selective on the weight of the items I chose to bring with me. The very light weight material of most items allowed me to maximize my space and and keep my total weight down around 6 kg. At that weight, the pack was a dream to carry! Plus, remember that you'll be able to wash clothes either by hand or machine regularly which allows you to carry less but still wear clean clothes. Buen Camino!
     
  8. BROWNCOUNTYBOB

    BROWNCOUNTYBOB Well-Known Member

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    During our first camino (Oct 2015) my wife used a Osprey 48L Kestrol and I used a Osprey 50L Atmos. We did not check on as luggage as we wanted to ensure our clothes and gear made it to Madrid. For the first leg of our flight within the US, we were asked to check our bags on at the gate, which was no problem. We didn't have any problems with the overseas flights. We took a Ryanair flight from Santiago back to Madrid and my Osprey Atmos was large enough to put both sets of collapsed trekking poles inside the backpack and we checked it on.

    We were mindful of "the 10% rule", and exceeded it slightly. We are less than 5 months from our second CF and will bring the same backpacks, but have tuned our "kit" by taking lighter sandals (PR Recovery Soles) and one less change of clothes, and a few other small items we did not use last camino.

    Bob
     
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  9. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey Bob - Really liked the PR Recovery Soles that you recommended. Enjoyed slipping them on every afternoon after walking. With or withour socks, they're great!

    I'm not really a fan of that "10% rule" someone came up with. The problem that I see with it is that it's dependant upon body weight. What a 140 pound person needs is no different than what is needed by a 220 pound individual. But, applying the 10% rule, it would suggest that the heavier individual would be fine carrying significantly more. IMHO suggesting that the heavier person look at no more than 22 pounds is crazy. That's too much weight for all kinds of reasons! A better perspective is to try to keep your kit under a certain weight. I'd suggest that folks begin with a target weight and then choose light weight items to help them meet that goal. My impression just from the last two weeks is that people were carring lighter loads. In the long run, particularly with 500 miles ahead of you, it's going to pay big dividends for the body and the quality of the walk. To walk far, carry less. Buen Camino!
     
  10. James Orrock

    James Orrock Active Member

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    Hey Wily. Congratulations to you and Nancy on completing the Camino Portugues. I loved your blog especially the wonderful pics and historical commentary. I will remember to sample the Galician seafood and wash it down with a bowl of vino de la casa. I also will attempt to emulate your 6 kg pack weight. This will be a real challenge for me but I think you are so right in saying that less weight on the back makes for a much more enjoyable camino. I noticed that you seem to walk in boots so you are not what I would call an ultra-mega-lightweight walker. Those dudes walk in tennis shoes!
     
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  11. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey James - I almost brought along my Saucony Xodus 6 trail running shoes. Having put hundreds of trail miles on these shoes, I'd have been just as comfortable in them as my Merrell's on a Camino. But, keeping my weight down, I just didn't want to carry a second pair of shoes for the trail. Plus, after my blisters last year, I wanted to see if I had improved on what had I learned about shoes and foot care (which I did). Finally, my Merrell's are Gor-tex lined, but my trail running shoes aren't. Knowing how it can rain heavily in Galicia, I chose the hiking shoe this time. If you have a good trail running shoe that you like, don't hesitate to make it your Camino shoe. The terrain is perfect for either kind of shoe as long as they fit you well and you've logged some miles in them. Buen Camino!
     
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  12. danvo

    danvo Super Moderator Staff Member

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    James, in summer I always recommending sandals :)
     
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  13. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    My own views are that as we are all different shapes and sizes that what might well be the perfect rucksack for one person, might not suit another at all ;-) – So with this in mind I have written up a few pointers on what I believe is the best method to choose the best rucksack for your Camino on https://web.archive.org/web/20151115120943/http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/p/m/23c942/



    Exactly the same can be said about footwear and after getting into too many discussions to mention about what Is “Best” I know believe that the choice of suitable boots / shoes / tail-runners or sandals is an individual thing – As, personally, I prefer a Lightweight Fabric “Gortex” boot (As these keep my feet dry (As I also wear gaiters) when it rains, but also let my feet breath when it is hot and dry + give a certain amount of support for my ankles) but I accept that other people have different views as they find a different footwear solution is better for themselves – danvo above being the perfect example as when I have tried to wear sandals when walking, small stones get under my heals and under the soles of my feet and I am always having to stop to remove them, but this might well be down to my gait ;-)



    Good Luck and Buen Camino

    Rob
     
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