1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

BEST Hiking boots,socks and backpack suggestions

Discussion in 'What equipment should you use and take' started by belloc, May 9, 2008.

  1. belloc

    belloc New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Dear all,

    What specific suggestions please for male hiking boots, socks and pack for a long distance Camino path with the intention of covering heavy daily miles

    Thanks
    Mark
     
  2. spanishlancer

    spanishlancer New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Southampton UK
    Just finished Sarria to Santiago last week. I know it is only 120 kilometres but as I am nearer 70 than 60 it was a good test.( one of our group of four was 78 year old German, who has walked a part of the Camino every year for 9 years,starting from his home in Munster, Germany,I found him looking a bit lost at the bus station in Lugo,but that is another story,) I have Berghaus Boots, a Berghaus 35litre + 8 pack and have a brand of sock called in the UK, 1000 mile sock. It is a double sock with an internal liner and I used Compeed Gel to lubricate my feet every day.My wife used a thin coat of vasilene. We had no problems whatever. Spend as much as you can on your boots and if possible get them fitted by a specialist.
    We are going to do the Finnisterre section in the second half of September,after the summer heat has passed.

    Buen Camino Ron
     
  3. Leslie

    Leslie Administrator

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    907
    Likes Received:
    294
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Prague
    Home Page:
    Congrats spanishlancer I had planned for two weeks in May - but life (more like work) has altered my plans.

    As for socks I used and still use for summer walking a very good sports sock. Double layer on the sole and fairly thin - bought them in Austria when I lived there and they are still in good condition after having walked the Camino in them once.

    I also used an Austrian cream for my feet - it was made from deer fat... It is very popular there and worked great.
     
  4. Companera

    Companera New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Dublin, Ireland
    Hi Spanishlancer - reading your post really made me want to be back there. I loved the stretch to Finisterre - wild and beautiful. It's not as well travelled as the road as far as Santiago, but all the better for that I thought. John Brierly's guide was helpful.
    I use the Berghaus pack as well and find it carries easily. I used smartwool socks and never had a blister! I would always suggest changing socks half way through the day in warm weather - it makes a real difference.
    C
     
  5. walker

    walker New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2008
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Compeed

    This summer I discovered why compeed didn't work last time and did this time. Last time I walked, I followed the needle and thread rules for blisters and the compeed turned into a gooey mess. This summer, I followed the compeed directions and did nothing to the blisters except cover them and the compeed worked. I have the kind of feet that blister easily, so I found thin socks, compeed and very wide hiking shoes a winning combination.
     
  6. John Hussey

    John Hussey Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2008
    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Florida
    Boots...Go the lightest you can. In fact, I would not opt for boots at all but a pair of trail runners, those designed for mountainous use, that long distance endurance runners use. Every pound upon one's feet is like 5 (or 6) upon one's back. Second, many have done the Caminos in sandals designed for the same mountainous tread, and that is an option. But whatever, have them broken in first.

    Socks...wool is about the best choice and merino the best wool Wool will keep your feet warm ebven when wet and also work great with the above footwear choices. Use NO cotton at all upon your feet. It absorbs and holds water, takes forever to dry, turns your feet into shrivelled-up prune looking skin very prone to blister.

    Pack... also make this small, no more than about a 40 liter one, 2600 or so cubic inches. On the Camino you need not carry mat, stove, fuel, food for multiple days, etc, so your load is considerably smaller than on a more 'expedition' oriented wilderness backpacking trek and there is no need to carry the additional weight of a larger and heavier pack. If it is larger you will overstuff it with needless items. I'd estimate carry weight, with a liter of water and a day's snacks should not be more than 20 pounds and likely a few pounds less.

    Less is better if you wish to make high miles.
     
    GreelyI likes this.
  7. bobo

    bobo New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Silk socks

    I did the Camino Frances with a mate, and by Pamplona his feet were in a dreadful state with blisters. The saintly hospitalera at Cezur Menor anointed his feet with a yellow ointment and recommended a sanitary towel between boots and blisters. But they remained bad and mine were fine throughout the whole camino. The difference? Silk inner socks. Wearing these inside wool walking socks seems to reduce friction significantly. And they wash and dry quickly in the albergue at night.
     
  8. geraldkelly

    geraldkelly Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2009
    Messages:
    202
    Likes Received:
    17
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Dublin, Ireland, Ireland
    Home Page:
    Hi Belloc

    I always walk in Ecco boots or sandals. I find them great. The boots are a bit pricy (?300) but I got 5 years out of my last pair before the sole went so you get your money's worth.

    The trick of wearing two pairs of socks is a good one because it reduces friction.

    Another important thing is that you should buy shoes that are a size bigger than your feet because after a couple of weeks walking your feet will get bigger anyway. With my old boots I wasn't able to wear them after the first two weeks but luckily the weather was good so I just wore my sandals.

    Gerald
     
  9. miobe

    miobe New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Anybody out there have any experience of DEUTER backpacks which were recommended to me in an outdoor store.
     
  10. Covey

    Covey Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2009
    Messages:
    1,173
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    London
    Most of the people I have seen using Deuter kit have been Germans and it seems OK. Not sure where it comes on the scale of amatuer to professional, but the Germans tend to buy good kit rather than cheap.

    Bit like the UK really. For cheaper kit you see a lot of Regatta and for the more serious kit you see North Face, Berghaus or Craghopper.

    Don't assume that expensive is the best. I use Regatta trousers, Berghaus shirts and layers, and Craghopper rain gear.:cool:
     
  11. iris

    iris New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Re: BEST backpack for women

    Would appreciate hearing from any experienced female travelers about what kind of backpack you took on the camino...presuming internal frame packs are the best (don't know if there's even any other kind anymore). I am an american...and will want to try it on....planning to take no more than 15 lbs. so obviously will have to be light...any specific details you can share would be really great...first hand knowledge is what this blog is best at and am grateful for opportunity to ask and get answers!!
     
  12. Covey

    Covey Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2009
    Messages:
    1,173
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    London
    Whilst not a woman, or at least not the last time I looked, I would suggest you look at the Osprey Atmos/Aura range. I have used the male Atmos L for the past 5 years and it has been brilliant. It is not cheap, but is very comfortable and versatile.

    I especially like the waist pockets which carry your sweeties, ciggies (50% of pilgrims smoke!!) and bits and bobs. My Atmos weighs a shade over 1kg which is good.

    When choosing a pack you need to have "a fitting". The good packs come in various frame sizes depending on the length of your back. If you end up with the wrong size, you will suffer!!

    I do not bother with the inbuilt hydration pack, but carry water in the plastic bottles it comes in in the two rear side pockets.

    Aura Series - Women's : : Osprey Packs, Inc.

    Osprey Atmos 35 - First Look - OUTDOORSmagic Reviews
     
  13. JanineSimone

    JanineSimone New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2010
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Almeria
    Home Page:
    Just to say thankyou for all your good advice i am sat in bed making my lists for my future planned walks feeling very positive after a low period in my life.
     
  14. JanineSimone

    JanineSimone New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2010
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Almeria
    Home Page:
    Hello,

    i never would of know that measurement matters. how do i know what measurements to look for from what point do i measure from and to eg my neck to lower back? thanks*
     
  15. Covey

    Covey Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2009
    Messages:
    1,173
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    London
    The video is even more long-winded than I am, but you should get the general idea.

    YouTube - Backpack Body Measuring: Torso Length & Hip Belt

    The important thing is that the weight sits on your hips and that the shoulder straps just stop the pack falling backwards. There should be very little downward weight on the shoulders and you should be able to slide a human hand easily between the strap and your shoulder.

    Too much downward pressure on the shoulders will make for a very painful trek!!:(
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2010
  16. geraldkelly

    geraldkelly Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2009
    Messages:
    202
    Likes Received:
    17
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Dublin, Ireland, Ireland
    Home Page:
    Hi Miobe

    I bought a Deuter backpack last year (Futura Pro 38 litre). For years I've had a Regatta, which was really cheap, but didn't have a frame. All that time I was troubled by pain in my right shoulder when I was walking. I struggled on thinking there was nothing I could do except a bit of stretching, but after I got my Deuter the pain just didn't happen. It has a mesh frame so more of the weight goes on your hips, that was the problem all along.

    So, basically, I'm extremely happy with my Deuter and it only cost ?100.

    Ger
     
  17. Covey

    Covey Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2009
    Messages:
    1,173
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    London
    Even with a frame it is important to get the weight distribution right in your pack, which means heavy stuff at the bottom and an even distribution of weight each side.

    I carry my water in the normal plastic bottles it comes in from the shop, and I carry two, one on either side of the pack. My Osprey Atmos pack has two side pockets which take the normal 1.5L bottles and I usually carry them 2/3 full. Packs with a built in water bladder tend to carry the bladder on the centre line of the pack, keeping the weight in the middle.

    If you carry too much weight on one side it will be very uncomfortable over a days walk.

    When buying a pack, check that the waist belt is wide, padded and substantial. A thin/narrow waist belt will cut into your skin and be uncomfortable. My Atmos waist belt has mesh zip pockets which are very useful for bits and bobs.
     
  18. maria

    maria New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2010
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I read through the discussion thread and they have pretty good advice. Take Osprey women size. It shapes up to your body contour. This is my first time to do the Camino -leaving March 18 and I never carry backpacks, not even for school use. But I was informed that Osprey is the best backpack. Also, I'm only bringing clima-cool and dryfit materials. It's very lightweight shirts and pants made for sweaty athletes. So you know it has superb absorbtion. Easy to wash and dry.
     
  19. Covey

    Covey Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2009
    Messages:
    1,173
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    London
    Being an "old soldier" I used to look at the adverts for the "technical clothing" with considerable doubt and relied on 100% cotton and wool garments to keep me warm.

    Until............. my first 5 day trip on the Camino from Sarria to Santiago with my son. Cotton tee shirts are a nightmare to walk in as they absorb the sweat and you walk all day in a wet shirt, which rubs the skin under the arms and it gets very sore.:(

    The next year I swallowed my pride and went and bought Berghaus base layer shirts which were brilliant. No cotton or wool, but when you sweat the moisture passes through the material and evaporates quickly, meaning you walk in a dry shirt all day.:D:D To the non technical they are called "high wick" which means the material gets rid of the moisture quickly.

    It also has the advantage that when doing ones dhobi, my shirts take 20 minutes on the drying line rather than an hour for a cotton shirt.
     
  20. El Condor 2014

    El Condor 2014 Well-Known Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2013
    Messages:
    291
    Likes Received:
    272
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    I am a little confused, I have read a few blogs and watch a video on youtube and they all say put the heavy stuff at the top to maintain the centre of gravity as close to your body as possible.
     
  21. highlander

    highlander Donating Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2012
    Messages:
    537
    Likes Received:
    130
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Hi El condor.

    my suggestion is to go visit a good outdoor shop and take the advice they give you......when it comes to boots and rucksacks you need to get the final advice from the shop.........for two reasons ... each persons body need to be measured and then a proper fit can be sorted,the same goes for boots..........when you load a rucksack........your sleeping bag goes in the bottom first....then depending on if you on a walking camping trip or camino (just walking)you will be carrying other kit that needs to be loaded slightly differantly.....there is only one way to load a rucksack and that is properly.. covey is correct you do load weight near the bottom above the sleeping bag......if the weight is on the top it will effect your balance.........that is why it is important to have a proper rucksack fitting...and be shown how to adjust and wear the bag correctly in order for the weight to be carried in good order....

    so many times you see people wearing rucksacks hanging below there arse, wrong size for there body......pick up good habits to pass on by going to a good outdoor shop, and the same for your boots my friend......
     
  22. El Condor 2014

    El Condor 2014 Well-Known Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2013
    Messages:
    291
    Likes Received:
    272
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    Thanks Highlander & Covey, I have gone back and watch the Youtube clips again, and you are both correct, as I was looking at a clip to hike in different terrain and camping, which is different to walking El Camino. I will take your advice and get fitted at the shop and ask the experts how to pack the backpack that I purchase, ( I am looking at a backpack Osprey Stratos 34L for me, and we will be looking at a 32 L for my wife on Saturday) thanks once again , Buen Camino !!!
     
  23. laughingriver

    laughingriver New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2013
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Portland, OR, USA
    Has anybody used the custom made boots by Esatto? I know they are heavy but I have a bone spur and many boots hit that bone and cause problems.
     
  24. SMJ

    SMJ New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2014
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Any comments on top loading Vs front or panel loading rucksacks? One immediate issue that springs to mind with the latter is waterproofing but that could be solved with a waterproof cover; whilst a plus would be easier access to one's belongings?
    Regards
    S:)
     
  25. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    Messages:
    1,149
    Likes Received:
    1,496
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Cumbria UK
    Home Page:
    I have tried various rucksacks over the years and keep coming back to top loaders –The main reason for this is ease of packing (I have written up my thoughts on selecting and packing rucksacks here - http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/p/m/23c8f9/)
    As for rain covers, these tend to work OK at keeping the worst of the rain off the rucksack and therefore keep it fairly dry, but I would sill Always advocate using some form of liner.
    Good Luck and Buen Camino
    Rob
     
  26. Bijoux

    Bijoux New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2014
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Just finished Camino Frances (sept 14 - finished in Finisterra). I'm a female and have the following suggestions:
    1/ backpack: I had an osprey 50L. It was too big. 35 litres would have been enough.
    2/ hiking shoes: I loved my Keen boots. Light and drying quickly.
    3/ socks: we only had smart wool or ice breakers socks. We brought 6 pairs each. My only regret was that I should have brought more thicker socks than light socks (no liner). We would change our socks 2 to 3 times per day (approximately every 10km).

    In fact, most of our clothes were ice breakers. Light, pack small, dry fast and do not smell as much.

    We also brought our sleeping bag (which we used a few times) and a mattress pad (which we never used). My advice is to not bring either. The silk liner was sufficient. And if cold wearing more layers during the night or bring a down light jacket would suffice and be lighter.


    For for water we used camel insert of 2 litres. It was enough for us. We got used to the weight. We had no blisters (okay maybe 1 or 2 small ones over 900 km). Partly due to our socks. Partly due to our water strategy. We drank about 2 liters per day consistently through the day.


    Hope this helps.
     
  27. janets

    janets New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2014
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    Ton of good information in here. I've begun to prepare for the Camino in 2015 and am trying to decide between Lowa Women's Renegade II GTX Lo hiking boots & Salomon Ellipse boots. Anyone have advice to break the tie? thanks - Janet
     
  28. frida1

    frida1 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2014
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I think it may be an individual choice. I love the Lowa Renegades and found the Salomon had a hard piece at the top of the boot that put pressure on my leg. For what it's worth, the Lowa boot is the top-rated women's hiking boot by Outdoorgearlab. You can check their website if interested.
     
  29. sean

    sean Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2009
    Messages:
    349
    Likes Received:
    95
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Anyone got experience of using Scarpa boots. I am currently looking at the Terra GTX and Ranger 2 GTX boots. The former are very light, whilst the latter feel like cement blocks. I have previously used many pairs of Berghaus Explorer Ridge boots but found they all leaked. I am looking for a leather boot, as I have found them to be the best in wet conditions. I do a lot of walking in boggy land in the West of Ireland and find that the Camino dust has ruined every pair of boots I have worn to date, They all leaked at the tongue after I came home from the Camino. It seems that the Gore Tex fabric becomes clogged and becomes porous. I have treated the boots with proofing products but they did not work. If you can help, many thanks.
    Sean,
    Dublin
     
  30. highlander

    highlander Donating Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2012
    Messages:
    537
    Likes Received:
    130
    Trophy Points:
    43
    scarpa mountain B2 BOOTS YEARS OF EXPERIENCE and the Models below B ratings........Scarpa do some nice leather boots fit for purpose just for the very thing.....bogs and muddy conditions.......I will Pm you in a 20 minutes with some types of SCAPRA for you to check out. There have brought lost of new models out now.lighter. best ones have the band round the boot above the sole.....
     
Loading...

Share This Page