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Camino de Levante

Discussion in 'Camino de Levante' started by Atlantic, Oct 16, 2011.

  1. Atlantic

    Atlantic New Member

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    Any chance of a slot for posts on this camino?
     
  2. Leslie

    Leslie Administrator

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  3. Atlantic

    Atlantic New Member

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    This is a walk of 1200 kms from Valencia to SDC. It is done by very few people and I hope to walk it next spring.

    Like the CM, I wouldn't recommend it for a first camino, but that depends on the person. Mine is a general comment, and is open to debate of course. For example, if someone had been a regular hilllwalker say in Scotland, doing things like the Fisherfield then they would be happy on such routes, I'd say.

    The most similar route is the Via de la Plata from Sevilla, but it seems that even this is increasing rapidly by those who have done the CF and want a quieter experience. I have only walked the VdP from Merida, and not from Sevilla. I did it in summertime against advice and I suffered. The Camino de Madrid is also similar, and in fact is quite near the CL at one point, but is a bit shorter.

    I have walked the CM and liked it very much and will return to do it again very soon. I saw maybe 6 pilgrims over 300 kms when I did it. It joins the CF at Sahagun. The shock is vivid! It was my most rewarding way (I've walked several) since my first CF - but that was long ago, before bedbugs and bedraces; unheard of then, because of massively fewer numbers.

    For the CL, there is a guidebook published by the Amigos in Valencia, in Spanish and I believe they also do a translation into English at around £20. I haven't seen it, but I hear it's good.

    There is also the excellent guide by Gerard du Camino, 22 euros. This is in French and I've just got my copy. It is well planned and laid out with excellent maps and info, plus useful photos and albergue info. If you like this guide and don't read French, the book is still worth it for the maps and other info are very clear and the text isn't necesary, I'd say. It seems that the 'flechas amarillas' are sometimes lacking on this way, so reasonable maps are handy.

    Funnily enough, I have a slight problem with guidebooks - I need them for info(albergues etc) but I'd prefer not to have my steps guided over closely. So I use the guides with caution, and move off-track when it suits me. If there's no albergue, I'll sleep outside, for I don't have the money for private accommodation. I also cook my own food and use restaurants very little.

    MUNDICAMINO has good info on this and other walks, and there is another site which I forget - but I have it on Favourites somewhere.

    Anyway, this is just a word on a little known Camino. I can't wait.:D If by the time I do it, I learn how to upload pics, I'll do so. I am very unhandy with regard to IT.

    To get there, I will fly to Madrid and train or bus down to Valencia - I hope to be there when they have their massive fireworks festival in March.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2011
  4. Atlantic

    Atlantic New Member

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    For those who want the guidebook mentioned below, from Valencia to Santiago.

    http://www.guides-cheminsdecompostelle.com

    As already said, if you don't read French this book is still very useful. Very clear maps, info on albergues and other accommodation, distances, text description of the way, pocket size, colour photos throughout.

    You can order it online.


    There is also the guidebook of the Amigos of Valencia, in Spanish and I believe also a translation into English. I can't say more for I've never seen this one.
     
  5. peregrina2000

    peregrina2000 New Member

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    Hey, atlantic,
    I don't know if you also participate on the Camino de Santiago forum (Ivar's operation), but if you don't you may not have seen Johnnie Walker's blog on the Camino de Levante. The posts are sorted on the right hand side of the blog's home page, and you can easily find his posts and pictures. Camino to Santiago de Compostela - Information and stories about the pilgrimage routes to Santiago.

    I have also walked the Camino de Madrid and loved it, and the Levante calls me as well. My problem is too many caminos with too little time and too many demands at work. Bah humbug. Buen camino, Laurie
     
  6. Atlantic

    Atlantic New Member

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    Thank you Peregrina

    As I am now what the Spanish call a 'Jubilado' , I'm going for it! Carpe Diem.

    I have more free time than money, so my pilgrimages are very modestly undertaken. I am not complaining at all - I'm happy to be alive and still walking.

    But for anyone else who reads this, I walked from Le Puy - Santiago in 1990, have walked several since and find that I now tend towards the contemplative quietness of CMs and, in anticipation, the Camino de Valencia. But I loved my first CFand the people I met, and cannot forget it. But I will repeat the CM in a few days time. It will not be full of people, for only 300 a year do this way. In November? Not a lot!

    My point in saying this is not to talk about me, but simply to speak to those who love the Caminos and wonder what they will do when older. You may follow the same way as I have and Peregrina has. Which is not better, not worse but different, and more about 'The Inner Game of Pilgrimage', if anyone remembers those book titles.

    PM sent.



     
  7. Deomedea

    Deomedea Guest

    Hi Atlantic!

    I walked the Camino de Levante a few years ago.

    1. If you start your walk in March the weather will be mild on the coast, but once you climb up onto the Meseta it will turn cold and you can expect quite frequent rain. Sleeping on the floor in unheated sports centres where there is no warm water may be no problem when the weather is hot, but when you are cold and drenched it is not a welcome perspective!

    2. I used the French guide book you have. Like you I thought it was great - until I started walking. The maps are useless because they are so small and above all outdated - for example, they do not show recent motorways and more often than not you cannot pinpoint your position accurately on them when you need to. One of the other pilgrims I met on my walk had also bought the guide and was just as disappointed. You should also be aware that the distances given are nine times out of ten underestimated. Expect to walk an hour or more extra on each stage. In its favour I would say that the list of places to eat and sleep was very complete, but it is now four years old at least.

    3. Check out the Valencia website for the latest list of albergues and have a look at its excellent interactive map of the walk:
    http://www.vieiragrino.com/camino-inter ... ml?etapa=1

    Wishing you all the best!
     
  8. Atlantic

    Atlantic New Member

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    Many thanks Deo for this info, which is totally in the spirit of camino. We give and share according to what we know.

    Re: the French Guidebook. I have the most recent edition, but probably it differs little from the original. I note carefully your cautions on this guide, but in the end I'm OK. I have always had a loose relationship to guidebooks and never totally follow or trust them . Yet I am glad that you say the albergues are mostly accurate. But the fact that you clearly offer a word of caution is very important in itself. Thank you.

    Re: the cold sections drenched with rain. Yes I have spent 25 years walking like this in Scotland (god 'elp me!) and am hardened to this, tho' of course I dont enjoy it. Ugh! But then the sun shines.

    I arrive in Madrid Barajas on March 21 and take a bus to Valencia. Then let's see what's what! I'm just back from India so the contrast will be - interesting.


    My answer to inaccurate guidebooks or stages which are too long is to doss down in my survival blanket and just relax wherever I get too knackered. I am an old bloke now of 65 and have learned to pace myself. However, being old does not mean being done and I'm rarin' to go. As I've done a few caminos now, I know this euphoria evaporates when the going gets tough - but you keep going! I the end I love it and keep on doing more caminos. As I think you do.

    I just picked up my new credencial in Le Puy today, near where I now live. I am a pilgrim since 1991 and still get a buzz in getting a new credencial.

    For anyone else who reads this and who does not have the time for the C Levante, then may I suggest to you the wonderful Camino de Madrid, which is truly for me the spirit of camino. Just go in spring or autumn please and NEVER in summer. I've walked this way twice and love it immensely. But maybe that's just me. If you like crowds then this is not for you. The CM is high, wide and handsome. But not too many people walk there, I'm glad to say.

    Thanks Deo!!!!!!

    And buen camino, Peregrina - you really walk the quality ways!




     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2012
  9. sean

    sean Active Member

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    Hi,
    Spent a few days walking out of Avila on the Levante recently and can highly recommend it. I had just finished the Portuguese route and felt like I needed some Me Time. The Portuguese is very busy and resembles the end of the French Way with a scramble for beds and dropping standards. Some of the Refugios (Puenta da Lima and Tui leave everything to be desired).
    The mountain stages around Avila will draw me back and is high on my next 'Bucket List'. Not too many on the walk. Met an average of 1 per day.
    Regards,
    Sean,
    Dublin
     
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