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Camino de Madrid Information

Discussion in 'Camin Madrid Albergues and Hostels' started by sean, Oct 28, 2014.

  1. sean

    sean Active Member

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    I have just completed the Camino de Madrid and made some notes which may of help to others considering walking the route;
    Madrid; There are a number of Albergues in Madrid which are centrally located and a number of hotels give special discounts for Pilgrims. I stayed with a friend, so I cannot offer any information as to which to recommend.
    The Way; Even though I stayed with a friend living in Madrid who was certain he knew where to start, we could not find any arrows leading us from the city centre. Locals had never heard of the Camino de Madrid and a few suggested we take the bus to Pamploma. Eventually, we took the Metro to Fuencarral, found the arrows and made our way from there. The Camino route for this first stage is over slightly rising ground and not too pretty. Our first days walk was 34 Km to Colmenar Viejo. There is a shorter walk which stops at Tres Cantos 22 Km. There is a Municipal Albergue at Tres Cantos. Note; there are no places to stop for coffee/food between Madrid and Tres Cantos. We stayed in Colmenar Viejo at Gran Hostal El Chiscon @ €25 per head sharing with breakfast included. Fantastic lunch @ €9.
    Colmenar-Cercedilla 35 Km
    The Way; Beware, coming out of town, the locals have marked a series of looped walks with similar markings to the Camino. We took one of them and turned a 35 Km into a 47 Km walk. After about 3 Km out of town, the real Camino trail goes under a big bridge and not to the left, as indicated by the local trail. Nice walk, again through rising ground. Nothing to stop for here and gradually being weaned off Cafe con leche. There is no albergue between Colmenar and Cercedilla but some small hotels at Manzanares el Real (15 Km), Navacerrada (29 Km). We stayed in the local sports centre on the way into town. Admitted after 9;30 pm when the activity finished inside and you sleep on very hard mats on the floor. Not recommended if you like your comforts after 35 Km. The Albergue is Free of charge. Cercedilla is a nice to to wander about, but eat early when you get the chance. There were no restaurants open in the evening and we ended up with rather large plates of sandwiches.
    Cercedilla-Segovia 30 Km
    The Way; A tough days walking over the Guadarrama mountain pass. It is over 1800 m of gut bursting proportion. Lovely forested and meadow decent into Segovia. Beware, the locals here also have their looped walks in the foothills marked with yellow paint. Make sure it is an arrow you follow, not a blob. One Albergue in Segovia but always full with tourists. Continue out of town on the Camino for a bout 2 Km to Zamarramala to a brand new Albergue. Get keys at Bar La Alcaldesa. The Albergue is free of charge (they will not accept donativo) and spotless. The food at Bar La Alcaldesa is fantastic and Pilgrim menu costs €8;50. Bad point. Tourists visiting Segovia have heard of this Albergue and when we returned from our evening meal, being the only two signed in, the place was full of tourists. They forced the lock on the door. I held the guy who seemed to know most about it and informed the bar owner. People like this will close an Albergue if the local community see it being abused. Lots to see in Segovia but you can get that in the tourist books.
    Segovia-Santa Maria la Real de Nieva 28 Km
    The Way; Be careful with markings again today, as they are far and few between over flat sandy soil. Small Albergue with 7 beds @ €5. Clean and no noise, as I was now on my own for the remainder of the trip. Lawrence of Alaska had returned to Madrid to go back to the US. Entry to the Albergue contact Javier Gozola 619 772412. Very bad food in this town. There are 4 bars and no restaurant. I was recommended a bar with a big Heinekin sign outside as being the best in town. It was rubbish food and I cannot understand why after they had served my junk, they proceeded to stuff half the town with beautiful paella. They were cooking it on 4 large pans when I was ordering my food but apparently, it is not for Pilgrims. I think Santa Maria should come back and have a second look at this town.
    Santa Maria la Real de Nieva-Coca 22 Km
    The Way; Beautiful walk through umbrella pine forest. Not too much to see (woods from the trees) but good shade from a hot 30 C sun. Coca is a lovely town with it's walls still intact. Has a Moorish look about it. I did some sketching this Camino, as I decided to leave my camera at home. Great fun with the locals as it was Sunday afternoon and we all sat about in the shade taking the mickey out of each other. The Albergue is in Casa de Peregrino @ €5 and you get the keys at Bar Muralla. Albergue is in a very old house and a bit creepy if staying on your own. Great Sunday lunch at €20 in the Bar Muralla. Expect to pay more on Sunday, as they do not do a Menu del Dia. There are places to stay at Nava de la Asuncion, a municipal Albergue and a small hotel.
    Coca-Alcazaren 25 Km
    The Way; Out again for another day in the forest with just one small town on the way, Villeguillo. It has an Albergue but is only 6 Km from Coca. The Albergue in Alcazaren is brand new and donativo. Get the keys at Bar Real. Good Menu @ €8. The sandy trails in the forest are very difficult to walk on, as the top layer of soil has been broken by vehicles coming out at night hunting. It is difficult to walk beside the trail, as there is no clear cut path running alongside. The way is reasonably well marked to date but keep your eyes open. There are a few dyslexic arrow writers about these here parts. Some lovely old buildings in town and good sketching country.
    Alcazaren- Cigunuela 38 Km
    The Way; Another long day through the pine forest in the beginning but turning toward huge fruit farms later. Beware coming out of Valdestillas, as it appears that the Camino goes into the woods. It actually goes on the road for a few Km and then a walk through discarded bathroom fittings and tiles into Puente Duero. There is an Albergue in Puente Duero just before you cross the bridge. Hang left if you do not wish to detour into Valladolid. This has many hotels offering Pilgrim deals. I continued to Cigunuela which is a bit of an uphill slog at the end of a long day. Fantastic Albergue Casa de la Maestro. Cost is €3 and the keys can be found at house No. 24. Only food in town is in Meson la Mielga. Good stew with local rose wine @ €8.
    Cigunuela-Medina de Rioseco 38 Km
    The Way; A long very wet day through nothing countryside. Very difficult to walk on the Camino and was forced to go to the road. Not pleasant and glad to see the Convento Santa Clara at about 3 pm. Basic accommodation @ €5 in the Convent. Good selection of bars and restaurants to choose from for food. Interesting old section to town and it of course famous for it's Samana Santa processions. Would love to have seen the place in better weather.
    Medina de Rioseco-Villalon de Campos 27 Km
    The Way; What was meant to be a fantastic walk along the Castilla Canal turned into a nightmare. It is a mosquito farm. I was eaten alive and ran part of the way. The bites became huge lumps the size of golf balls and one was interfering with the muscle movement in the back of my left leg. The walk, like most of the way from Segovia is flat with very little undulation. I would have liked to have taken a leisurely stroll along the canal but that was not to be. There is a choice of route coming out of Medina de Rioseca and it divides at a small park with a pond in the middle. Keep right for the canal, as it is the recommended route. There is an Albergue at Cuenca de Campus which is 5 Km short of Villalon de Campos. The municipal Albergue in Villalon is clean and comfy @ €4. I ate at the Restaurant Pena in the centre of the town and had a very bad meal. Avoid this one, there are a few more about. The town is very interesting and has the famous Jurisdiction Column in the central square. It is made from stone left over from the construction of Burgos Cathedral.
    Villalon de Campos-Sahagun 36 Km
    The Way; Another mosquito filled day, as the route was wet and soggy with the 3 M's. Maseta, Mud and Mosquito in abundance. Whatever the mosquito have been feeding on, they certainly pack some punch. Even the locals had themselves half beaten to death trying to stop them biting. I ran most of the way today and swore like a sailor. Sahagun was a warm sight as it came into view. Lovely cold beer in Bar Asturcon beside the municipal Albergue in Sahagun. Great jazz music and nice host Ampdro Felipe. Food is typical Camino offering and there would be few surprises between here and Santiago. Hard to get used to the numbers after being alone for so many days.
    In General; The Camino de Madrid lived up to expectations. It is not too difficult after Segovia and had I company, it would have made some of the long slogs and even longer evenings a bit easier to take. It is a world away from the madness of the Camino Frances, especially after Sarria. Madrid to Santiago took 21 days walking and 5 for my mind to stop walking when I returned home.
    I hope this guide is of help to some contemplating the route and if I can offer any further assistance, please ask.
    Regards,
    Sean,
    Dublin
     
  2. geraldkelly

    geraldkelly Member

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  3. sean

    sean Active Member

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    Hi Ger,
    It is a fantastic new building but was being abused by 'Tourists' from Segovia when I stayed there. The albergue is about 2 Km past Segovia on the Camino and has beautiful views back on the city, as it is situated on the opposite hillside.
    Regards,
    Sean,
    Dublin
     
  4. Emma

    Emma Member

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    Hi Sean,

    Thanks for this post. I am once again considering doing part of the Camino de Madrid and came back to my original post (elsewhere on madrid thread) from about 2 years ago. I saw the link to this post and am very grateful for the details you've shared.

    So, I am heading to Madrid on Monday and plans I had made have fallen through (families!!). I have decided to use this opportunity to gift myself a few days of peace and walking and am going to leave my sister's apartment in Northwest Madrid and walk to Segovia. My plan is to leave Madrid Tuesday morning and arrive in Segovia either on Thursday or Friday. I have done little to no walking recently but I know if I pace myself I can do this in spite of my lack of preparation.

    Is there anywhere I can find information akin to Brierly's book about this section of the Madrid route? There seems to be a dearth of information about it! Even a list of hostels along the way between Madrid and Segovia would be great as I can use this each day to plan my stages.

    I have heard of a few incidents that have occurred (albeit on the CdeF) and wonder if those that have knowledge would reckon the CdM is safe enough for a female solo walker? I am aware nowhere is ever 100% safe and know to keep my wits about me. I know the Madrid route is fairly isolated re: numbers of walkers.

    Thanks in advance!

    Emma (the returning walker!)
     
  5. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    Hi Emma

    I haven’t walked The Camino de Madrid but also looked at it a couple of times before eventually opting for different routes – The best website that I have come across for info is http://www.mundicamino.com/los-caminos/40/camino-de-madrid/ where the route is broken down into stages, with each stage then having a sub menu that links to maps (With stage height gain / loss charts), Stretches (This is a breakdown of the stage and gives a good walking description) and accommodation which gives some info on what is available on the route.

    I Hope that helps

    Best Regards

    Rob
     
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  6. Emma

    Emma Member

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    That's great Rob, thank you! I am trying to navigate my way via google maps while sitting at my kitchen table. This information seems to be exactly what I am looking for.

    Cheers! Emma
     
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