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Camino Portugues From Lisbon

Discussion in 'The Camino Portugues' started by amanda121287, May 4, 2018.

  1. amanda121287

    amanda121287 New Member

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    I did the Camino de Santiago last summer. This summer I'd like to do something a little different. I'm considering doing the Camino Portugues from Lisbon to Santiago. I am a woman traveling alone and felt very safe last year on the Camino frances because there were many people and it was almost impossible to get lost. I have some questions regarding the Camino Portugues:

    1. Will there be a significant amount of other people doing it in June/July so I won't feel alone?

    2. I'm on a very tight budget and will need pilgrim albergues along the way. Are there enough on the Camino Portugues or would I have to stay in hotels?

    3. Is there a guide for this Camino. I know that Brierley has one, but it just covers a week. I'm looking to go to Santiago from Lisbon.

    4. Is this Camino well marked?

    Thanks so much for your help!
     
  2. Crepes4Suzette

    Crepes4Suzette Well-Known Member

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    Hi, Amanda - Wise Pilgrim has a guidebook from Lisbon. They also have an app. And Gronze.com is always helpful for lodging and the route.

    I can only speak to from Porto onward, but it was well-marked. It's not as scenic as the Frances, but I especially liked the towns along the way. Lots of walking by vineyards and only a day or two with significant hills. There is some road walking that I found problematic, but nothing too long. I'll leave the solo women's safety comments to others, as I went with my sister this last time. We walked in September and there were a fair number of others, but we still walked a few hours here and there with no one else around. I'm not sure if June/July would be similar.

    There were enough albergues, and people here can give you good suggestions for ones they liked. I especially liked BlueSock Hostel in Porto, Ideas Peregrinas in Tui, and Alojamiento Camino Portugues in O Porrino.

    Happy planning!
     
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  3. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    Hi Amanda

    Welcome to the forum :)

    Like C4S, I also trekked the route from Porto, so can only “Advise” from there

    1) Will there be a significant amount of other people doing it in June/July so I won't feel alone?



    The Camino Portuguese is the second favourite Camino, and certainly from Porto, there will be plenty of others walking the route, but I believe less before there https://caminoways.com/camino-statistics-popular-2016



    2) I'm on a very tight budget and will need pilgrim Albergue’s along the way. Are there enough on the Camino Portuguese or would I have to stay in hotels?



    Again – There are Albergue’s available most, if not every night after Porto – This website might help a little http://caminhosantiagoviana.pt/caminhocosta.html



    3) Is there a guide for this Camino. I know that Brierley has one, but it just covers a week. I'm looking to go to Santiago from Lisbon.



    I used https://www.csj.org.uk/product/cami...-2017-part-2-porto-to-santiago-central-route/ but I see that The Confraternity of Saint James also do a guide from Lisbon to Porto now - https://www.csj.org.uk/product/cami...ugues-part-2-porto-to-santiago-coastal-route/



    4) Is this Camino well marked?



    The section from Porto is certainly well marked :)



    The remains of my own trek notes are at https://web.archive.org/web/20151031050709/http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/50192/c4/ Unfortunately much of the detail was lost when Trip Advisor took over VT and wiped the servers !!



    Good Luck and Buen Camino

    Rob
     
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  4. Wily

    Wily Francés 2016; Portugués 2017; Inglés/Fisterra 2018

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    Hey Amanda - C4S has already offered you dome excellent information. Let me see if I can add on just a bit more. Like her, I have walked from Porto to Santiago, so I can’t really address the Lisbon to Porto section. Let me start with the guide book. I’m not sure what you saw, but the Brierley book that I have covers the entire route from Lisbon to Santiago. So, if you liked his presentation of the CF, his guide of the Portugués should be useful to you for this entire route as well. Although I walked during a very quiet time of year (March/April), I believe that you will find the summer months to be much busier. Even when we walked, there were still plenty of pilgrims out there with us. Regarding albergues, there are not generally as many accommodations as you found on the CF. When you look at the stopping points in the Brierley guide, most of those towns, at least from Porto up, have municipal albergues. Of course, there are also the more numerous private albergues which are a less expensive alternative to hotels along The Way. We primarily stayed in private albergues where, on the average, we paid €10-12 a night for a bed. If you visit the gronze.com website, you’ll see a pretty comprehensive list of accommodations by stage including albergues with price information. Again, speaking for the route north of Porto, it is extremely well marked. You’ll also see in Brierley’s guide that you can choose either the Central or Coastal routes from Porto. We walked the Central route, and I again agree with C4S that it wasn’t generally as scenic as the CF, but still a great Camino experience. Although it’s pretty flat easy walking, the cobblestones can be problematic for some causing leg, knee, or foot problems. Do give yourself a couple days in Porto. It’s a wonderful city! Finally, my favorite overnight was at Casa Fernanda located about halfway between Barcelos and Ponte de Lima. Her hospitality is second to none! She has been feeding and sheltering pilgrims in her home for a number of years now on a donation basis. Bom Caminho!
     
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  5. John Matthews

    John Matthews New Member

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    Hi Amanda, I walked from Lisbon to Santiago last year (2017). John Brierley has an excellent guide book that covers the entire walk from Lisbon to Santiago. I needed to be mindful while leaving Lisbon as it's not to well marked and I found the walking for the first 3 days challenging due to the amount of road walking and the heat I experienced when I walked. I had no problems finding Albergues / Hostels on the entire way. The marking improves from Porto on to Santiago. I wish you well on your Camino.
     
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  6. KateM

    KateM New Member

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    Hi Amanda.
    I am planning to walk from Lisbon to Santiago in late August/September 2019! I want to go NOW but have to wait for my 2 walking buddies to be ready so I've indulged in planning and research while I wait.
    The 2018 version of Brierley's book is available on line and is excellent. We did the Frances in 2016 and used his guide for that too.
    I can't advise you from experience but from reading the guide book and the research I've done, I've been able to plot out a plan of walking the distance in 31 days (walking only - we'll add in rest days too!) according to available accommodation and walking about 20km a day. (We're not young girls any more!) Only a couple of stops require us to pay hotel prices and they appear to be before Porto.
    Good luck and safe travels!
    Buen Camino!

    Kate

    PS: Brierley's guide suggests walking shoes are sufficient for this route as opposed to heavier boots!
     
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