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Do most/any albergues have refrigerators for use by pilgrims?

Discussion in 'Albergues - Hostels' started by neilbron, Mar 10, 2014.

  1. neilbron

    neilbron New Member

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    Hi everyone,

    I've read quite a bit about how albergues work and what facilities they generally have.
    One simple question - do most/any albergues have refrigerators for use by pilgrims?
    Thinking about buying food from the supermercado for a simple breakfast.

    Thanks,

    Neil.
     
  2. highlander

    highlander Donating Member Donating Member

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    Neil

    not all of them, in your guide book if it says no kitchen, then no refrigerator.
     
  3. Francis

    Francis New Member

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    If there is a refrigerator, would it have a freezer compartment? I have knee issues from time to time and using an ice pack is a helpful luxury.
     
  4. highlander

    highlander Donating Member Donating Member

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    hi
    some of the albergus have a refrigerator with a freeer compartment. I have seen a husband & wife staying in a privae albergue without a kitchen for the pilgrims use, he just got some ice (the private albergue had a bar)from the bar and prolem solved, they see this every day.

    You get ice almost any place you stop apart from albegue San bol which is just before hontanas which has no electricity and is isolated.

    Just go to the nearest bar if you have problems and ask.
     
  5. neilbron

    neilbron New Member

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    Thanks everyone, if there is no fridge, I'll just ask for some ice!

    Cheers,

    Neil.
     
  6. Regina38

    Regina38 New Member

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    Your guide book will help you out there . However, the albergues that are said to have "new, modern kitchens" may have sparkling sinks and stoves and refrigerators, gleaming cabinets, and granite counter tops, but they will not have pots, pans, dishes, cups,or cutlery. It seems that the cafés complained that if the peregrinos purchase and prepare their own meals, their businesses would be negatively affected. So-- bring a small, four cup pot, ,the kind with two round handles and pack it with clothing. You can loop the pot handle on the back of your pack. Bring a plastic bowl and a soup spoon. Once in Spain, buy a cheap knife. You can stew veggies or pasta and flavor it with bouillon packets. I know you said "breakfast," homemade was your goal. But this info should help.
     
  7. unadara

    unadara New Member

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    I can remember a lot of nice kitchens, Many with Fridges/freezer areas and we cooked many meals too (not in Galicia) a few of us would agree, buy 4 pots of yogurt (not sold separate) a carton juice, bananas. We usually waited till we had first stop for cafe/the and tostadas. BUT....as we started earlier and earlier, heat, crowds, personal "habit", I tended to keep my pot of yogurt under the bed, and bananas/cake/etc in top or side of rucksack. Often we might have a bit of bread/cheese snack packed too. You could eat as you go if you needed. Some mornings were more relaxed than others, you could sit down, vaseline your feet, put on your boots, eat a banana, drink water and leave quietly, other mornings you crept out and ate nothing. Nuts and fruit in your bag are a good idea. One friend/walker had to have an instant coffee and in some alberques he used the hot water out of a tap! He only got sick once and that wasn't due to coffee.
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2014
  8. highlander

    highlander Donating Member Donating Member

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    I have a friend who runs a more up market restaurant on the Camino in Ponferrada and when I visited when not doing the Camino, he mentioned pilgrims going to the supermarket and not using his place.

    after a while you can get fed up with the pilgrims menu or just eating out all the time, because I camp a lot I take a pocket rocket stove and titanium mug set. I am sorted to eat when it suit me. eating late is not for me anyway, and sometimes I like to stop out in he country and make a coffee.

    also it can pay not to use a albergue sometimes with a kitchen, less noise and those Spanish boys on bikes love a late meal and a chat.

    I am very fortunate because I have already had some albergues emailing me to ask when I want a bed reserved, this comes from multiply Caminos in the same year, since I have been doing this, and I get a better deal if I have a meal with the locals.

    and when I reach the coast my two person mountain tent is always full with someone wanting to escape another night in a albergue.
     
  9. neilbron

    neilbron New Member

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    Thanks everyone, that has filled in the picture perfectly. I've been an early riser all my life but I have to eat something before I walk out the door, even if it is 4 in the morning. I was thinking of the yoghurt/bananas/fruit juice solution - easy, nutritious and quick. Hopefully I'll be walking with my wife so we can share a simple breakfast, and she's a great cook so we can enjoy some communal meals at albergues that do have some facilities.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2014
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