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Footage of Going by Horse and Carriage

Discussion in 'The Camino by Horse' started by Lydia -Camino Documentary, Nov 5, 2010.

  1. Lydia -Camino Documentary

    Lydia -Camino Documentary New Member

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    We followed a couple from France for our documentary on the Camino that were going by horse and carriage. They had an extremely hard time - they said the hardest parts were the cities and finding safe routes for the horses. They joke that they almost divorced in the first couple of days - but they made it.

    At first glance it seems that going by horse would be easier, but actually tis always harder. During the 7 weeks we were shooting, we only ran into another man that was doing it by horseback.

    You can find clips of Alain and Bernadette on our website or on facebook.
     
  2. Covey

    Covey Active Member

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    Regretfully, doing the Camino Frances by horse seems to be getting almost impossible. A couple of years ago I chatted to a Spanish lady who was doing the Camino on horseback and she said she had almost given up on numerous occasions. Her main problem was where to keep the horse at night. There are almost no stables in towns any more so she had to camp on the edge of town on waste land. Finding food for the horse was a problem as was finding a vet or farrier if needed. She was riding, but I have seen more pilgrims using horses as pack animals, but although you are spared carrying a pack, the problems of where to keep the horse at night remain the same.

    Walking the Camino with a donkey seems to stray into the "nightmare" bracket!
     
  3. Anna-Marie

    Anna-Marie New Member

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    Hi Covey,

    Now I'm curious. Why is walking with a donkey worse than with a horse?

    Anna-Marie
     
  4. Covey

    Covey Active Member

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    Those I have come across with horses on the Camino do not seem to have much difficulty in getting the horse to go in the required direction.

    Donkeys, on the other hand, seem to have their own idea of where they want to go and when! (Rather like women really!! :D ) My son came across a donkey with two French "owners" who were struggling to persuade the donkey to walk in the shadows of the roadside trees!!
     
  5. Anna-Marie

    Anna-Marie New Member

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    That's a good point. Although Tim Moore did manage it--with entertaining results.

    Anna-Marie
     
  6. Covey

    Covey Active Member

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    I read his book which was very amusing. I rather liked the economics of the idea in that you bought the donkey at the start, had all the costs of feed etc along the way, and then paid the guy you bought it from to come and take it away when you got to Santiago! At which point, said donkey went back to France and repeated the process with a new owner all over again. Good business for some!

    I am advised that life is easier on the trail with a donkey if in fact you take TWO, as they like company and behave better.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2010
  7. Anna-Marie

    Anna-Marie New Member

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    It is interesting economics, though I'd imagine for Tim Moore it was an investment he earned back when he published his book. It also made a better ending than him leaving the donkey at some random farm.

    And in another way, I guess it's not much different from renting a car. (Financially, I mean--in other respects it's obviously extremely different.)

    Anna-Marie
     
  8. Covey

    Covey Active Member

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    I have seen a group on horseback along the Camino Frances, but they appeared to be an organised "tour" and had a support vehicle carrying camping kit as well as food etc for the horses. Doing it "en solo" would appear to have a lot of complications. Effectively you have to camp along the way so you are able to be with the horse/donkey and as with pilgrims who plan on camping instead of using the albergues, the camping sites are generally on the edge of town, away from the bars and albergues so socialising is somewhat difficult. Leaving your beast tethered whilst you go off to the shops or to find something to eat is a bit fraught as you are having to leave the beast and all your kit "out of sight" and most of the camp sites I have come across seem to be very sparsely populated! Also you need a "bombproof" temperament for the animal if there are any Fiestas locally as the locals seem to love tossing fire crackers around and a horse could be easily spooked.

    Walking with a pack horse carrying all your kit seems more sense than riding and at least it is easier to chat to other pilgrims whilst you are at ground level rather than towering above them.
     
  9. Tanya Yaksich

    Tanya Yaksich New Member

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    Several times i crossed paths with a young girl and her horse. She seemed to have a different friend walking with her each time. The last time i saw her she was walking back from the lighthouse at Finisterre. She had walked all the way from Switzerland and the journey took her more than 3 months. You had to be a fastish walker as the horses gait was quite fast, so i didn't have time to chat for long, as she was going too fast for me.
     
  10. robermarbe

    robermarbe New Member

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    Hi
    I just want to tell you that in the Camino Franc├ęs there are facilities in a number of Albergues to accommodate horses. I did an study to do it myself and I found out that every 30-40 km maximum you have place where to leave the horse after the walk.
    Of course, the problem is not only to find a place for the horse to sleep but to make sure there is food, vet etc.
     
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