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From Le Puy To Santiago In A Tent?

Discussion in 'Le Puy en Velay to Santiago de Compostela' started by Parvatiji, Jul 30, 2015.

  1. Parvatiji

    Parvatiji New Member

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    Hello all good people!

    I´m soon about to start my camino, going in late august, and bringing my tent.
    Just wonder if there´s any problems down the road to set up camp? I heard it´s not legal in Spain, but thinking, one night here, one night there shouldn´t be a problem..
    What do you think? Or know :) Also going to bring a camping kitchen, to cook most of the food, or atleast my breakfast on. Is there small shops kind of regularly on the way? To buy fruits, veggies, and more..
    And to go alone as a woman isn´t a problem, right :) ?

    Never done anything like this before, so I have just one ticket, thinking that with around three months, I should have time enough. Witout stress. But that also mean, I will have summer and kind of winter in november when I´m finishing. Should I worry more about the cold or the hot? Somehow I just been focusing on the cold weather, and think I have clothes enough for that, but it can be hot naa? :) In august and september?

    Thank you anyway:)

    Boom!
     
  2. stevelm1

    stevelm1 The Happy Peregrino Donating Member

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    You will find stores all along the trail to get your food. I have read that camping is frowned upon, but there are Albergues that allow camping and some actual camp grounds. From what I have read a woman walking alone has little to worry about on the Camino, but camping alone can only add to risk. I have also heard that no one walks alone on the Camino, which means that once you start walking you will run into people that will help you find what you need and be there when you need them, even if you did not know you needed them.

    August is hot in Spain, it starts cooling down in September. I start in September and I am bringing cloths for hot and cold. By November it can start getting cold especially in the mountains and everywhere at night. As Fall starts the chance of rain increases.
     
  3. SSAY

    SSAY New Member

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    Hi Parvatiji !

    I am going to start my camino from Le Puy August 14th to reach SJPP.
    My expectations are then to connect SJPP to Irun and walk Camino del Norte + Primitivo.

    So on my side I will bring my own tent and food stuff to sleep outdoor too but also I would sleep other kind of accommodations like hiking and pilgrim lodges. It will basically depend of weather, accommodations availabilities and my mood too... I don't have really plan it...

    I have check different informations about camping on the le Puy Route in France (I'm French). Many french pilgrim lodges (seems like around 1 on 2) allow campers on their site for something like a 5 euros fee. So you could sleep safely, use their kitchen and restroom (!!!). Also it is possible to pay extra for breakfast / diner if you want.

    In France, setting your tent (for free) away from a campsite, for one night only is not strictly forbidden. But it depends of very local laws, it is a bit different in each counties. Generally I think when you are far from cities it is ok if you choose an appropriate place (not a private one and not attracting too much attention) and also a good time to set it and leave (between 6pm - 8am).

    Some points about food and cooking. It's ok in France for using your portable trekking gaz stove, but depending the season and place, firewood is forbidden.
    There are not so many shops on Le Puy Route, but you will find one at least every day. Main problem is that Route is going through remote areas, not so many villages with shops and with their opening time it is not sure it will be open at the time you would arrive walking in front of it. And off course shops are usually closed on Sunday. So you will have to deal with that and keep in your backpack enough food for 2 days.

    About Spain... Yes camping is forbidden, but... :D

    Bon Chemin !
     
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  4. Parvatiji

    Parvatiji New Member

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    Merci guys :) Feels a bit calmer now.
    Is there water, like lakes or something on the way? To clean up from time to time :)

    Wow, how far are you gonna go? I arrive the 25:th.
    I guess it will show during the way, but can I ask another question then as you are french and all? :)
    Is there train from Beauvais to Le puy? Or how do I easiest go?
    And how do your foodstufflist look like? :)
     
  5. SSAY

    SSAY New Member

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    Hi,

    Some answers :

    About Beauvais (airport ?) to Le Puy.
    You could go by SNCF train. One ticket : Beauvais central -> Paris -> Lyon ->(St Etienne) -> Le puy. 6-7 hours journey / cost around 75 - 95 euros. Easier but expensive
    Or you could go by SNCF train + Eurolines bus + train : Beauvais central -> Paris (train 1.2h / 15 euros) then Paris -> Clermont Ferrand (Eurolines bus 4.30 h / 9 euros) then Clermont Ferrand ->Le Puy (train 2.2h /25 euros). Cheaper but have to manage connections.

    links :
    http://uk.voyages-sncf.com/en/
    http://www.eurolines.fr/en/

    Regarding my cooking & food stuff :
    - Fire mapple gas stove + 100gr gas bottle + 0.75 litre pot + lighter + knife/spoon + sponge = 450 grams
    - tupperware box + 4 chinese style instant noodles + 4 dried mashed potatoes + 4 dried vegetable soup + cornflackes like = 650 grams. Will buy fresh good food on the way and actually would try to only keep 2 days food in my backpack.
    - Will bring 2 litres max of water (drink/food/shower). Refill everywhere.

    Last topic... shower in France :)
    I don't know really. May be others pilgrims could answer to you better than me...
    Certainly you will cross rivers and walk near lakes or ponds. But I can not answer if it will be so easy to get in (depending of easy access, privacy, etc...). Anyway try not to put soap in the rivers... So go in the water, go out, use soap, rinse yourself away from the border, and return to river without soap. I have heard some people have river/ponds/spring bath everyday walking the first part of the Le Puy route... So I guess you could do it.
    But recommend you to bring small glove made of towel material to clean yourself even with very small amount of water... So everyday before sleeping and morning :D You are pilgrim, don't turn too much to homeless looking person !

    Bon chemin
     
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  6. ThirstyEric

    ThirstyEric Member

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    It seems like adding a tent and stove will add a significant amount of weight to the load you have to carry. If sleeping outdoors, you'll also need some kind of sleeping pad that you would not need indoors, and your sleeping bag will need to be rated for colder temperatures than you would need if sleeping indoors. All of that will add to the weight. And then you'll need a bigger pack to carry it all. More weight.

    You'll be carrying the gear for a wilderness backpacking trip. To me, one attraction of the Camino is that I won't need to carry all of the camping gear. I've done lots of wilderness backpacking in the U.S., and it is great, but the gear is heavy. I'm looking forward to leaving all that extra weight at home!

    You said you've never done anything like this before. Do you mean the Camino, or do you mean a backpacking trip? If you haven't done either, I'd suggest putting all the gear you think you want to take in your pack and then doing a long hike with it all on your back. Then take the camping gear out of the pack and do the same long hike with just the usual pilgrim gear. Compare how you feel with the different loads and decide if the extra gear is worth it just to have the option to camp occaisionally.

    Whatever you decide, Buen Camino!
     
  7. Leslie

    Leslie Administrator

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    @Parvatiji when I walked from Le Puy to Conques in 2012 I met a few people wide camping. First off take mosie spray or they will eat you alive at night. One young guy we met had more than 100 bites one morning after sleeping outside. He needed treatment and rest for a couple of days. He was doing much the same as you, but he had started in Paris. He was quite small and his pack was huge.

    Along the Le Puy route the gites can get expensive. There are quite a few convents and monasteries to stay in though that are great and very reasonable. I would suggest staying there to clean up, wash clothes etc.

    I had a little experiment with a T shirt for the first 5 days. The shirt said you could wear it for something like 30 days without it smelling. After 5 days of walking in the same shirt there was no smell from it, but it was covered in salt stains fro sweat. My other half decided enoght and washed it...
     
  8. IrishGurrrl

    IrishGurrrl Member

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    Buen camino!
     
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