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Hiking Shoes - Size Up?

Discussion in 'What equipment should you use and take' started by Amy Brooks, Feb 10, 2019.

  1. Amy Brooks

    Amy Brooks Active Member

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    A good friend did the CF a few years ago - and she is recommending that I size up one whole shoe size to account for feet swelling.

    Anyone else have experience with this? I am wary of going up one whole size - maybe half? I am concerned more slipping around = more blisters.

    Any thoughts? I am prepping to get my shoes now so they are well broken in for my May CP.

    Thanks
    Amy
     
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  2. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    Hi again Amy
    Having correctly fitting shoes is crucial when walking Caminos and, although I have suffered with swollen feet myself in the extreme heat walking Camino routes in the summer months, you still need to balance too bigger boots with too small :)

    But, as you have correctly mentioned, you do need some extra room to take into account the swelling of your feet, particularly of you are walking in the warmer months and particularly if your feet are prone to swelling, but, as you also mentioned, if your boots are too big and allow your feet to move around inside them, this also can cause blisters. So I also agree, maybe a 1/2 size (UK) is a good aiming point.

    Another consideration is a decent sock, or combination of socks, I used to use Bridgedale Liners socks and Thorlo outers, but on my last Camino changed over to the aptly named 1.000nd Milers and walked 1.000 miles in these from Cumbria to Santiago de Compostela without getting a single blister.

    Yet another consideration is the boots themselves, footwear has been an often discussed topic on here over the years and it comes down to a personal choice with what is ideal for one walker, perhaps not suiting another at all !! My own being lightweight Fabric “Gortex” type boots as these both keep my feet dry when it rains (Worn with the correct clothing, gaiters etc to stop water wicking down your socks) and also letting them breath in hotter dryer times.

    I wrote an article for a local magazine in my Native Lake District about choosing the correct footwear last year, http://www.trpub.net/assets/applets/Tethera_11_March_2018_-_Strands.pdf#page=40 might be of interest to you :)



    Good Luck and Buen Camino

    Rob
     
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  3. UnkleHammy

    UnkleHammy Well-Known Member

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    I recommend going to a good outdoors store (REI or equivalent) and try on several types and sizes of foot coverings (trail runners, boots, etc) while wearing whatever socks (Marino socks from Costco are great) that you will be training in.

    Start early so that if you don't like the first combination then you can try some other combinations. Remember that your feet are your primary mode of transport.
     
  4. Wily

    Wily Francés 2016; Portugués 2017; Inglés/Fisterra 2018

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    Hey Amy - My Merrell’s are about a half size up. More than that would be too large for me. I do the same thing with regard to my trail running shoes, but it does depend on the brand (I find my Saucony's run small, (9.5M),but not my Brooks (9M). There is a great deal of variation among shoes. I’d suggest that you follow Unklehammy’s suggestion of actually going to an outfitter and have them size the shoes for you. Regarding socks, I like a light to medium wool sock. I also wear the Injinji toe socks to prevent blisters on or between my toes. Finally, get a stick of Bodyglide for your daily foot care. Keeping your feet lubricated will help prevent certain problems. Then, as Unklehammy says, get them well before your Camino and break in your hiking shoes. You don't want to hit the trail in new shoes unless they’re trail runners (which don’t need breaking in). Just as a side note, if you have a Dick’s Sporting Goods near you or if you order shoes online from them, they offer a great return policy (60 days I believe) on shoes for any reason. Bom Caminho!
     
  5. hindsfeet

    hindsfeet Collect moments, not things

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    Hi Amy, Great advice already on the forum. I did the CF last May, and the only thing I feared were those dreadful blisters that can make every step miserable. I went one whole size larger shoe (advice from my local REI). My days walking were mostly long, so this is what worked for me. Like Wily, I started with rubbing the bodyglide on my feet, then the Injinji toe socks (Love them!), then a pair of super comfy Thorlo socks. Starting out, it was perfect....nice padding, no slippage. About four hours of walking, I would stop, take off my Injinji socks, freshen my feet with baby wipes, put more bodyglide on and then those same Thorlo socks (they were nice and dry). My feet did swell, so then that one pair of Thorlo socks took me comfortably to my Albergue.....and Tapa's!
    Wishing you HAPPY FEET ...Buen Camino Amy!
     
  6. Wily

    Wily Francés 2016; Portugués 2017; Inglés/Fisterra 2018

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    Hey Amy - The other thing to recommend that I left off my first post is to check out better insoles than typically come with whatever shoe you buy. You’ll see in other threads that a number of us use Superfeet Insoles. I was fitted for mine at a running store. Although they may seem to be a bit expensive, I’ve found them to offer that extra support that I like for long distance walking or running. Bom Caminho!
     
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  7. Amy Brooks

    Amy Brooks Active Member

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    Hammy

    Thanks Hammy - I like Smartwool, but I will check out the Merino's.

    Thanks for the recs and feedback.

    Amy
     
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  8. Amy Brooks

    Amy Brooks Active Member

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    Hindsfeet

    I think you wrote a bunch of stuff about socks but I forgot that all when you wrote "tapas" - lol - jk - This sounds pretty involved and not what I am doing now - I hate to adopt a new practice my first day on the Camino but i do NOT want blisters.

    I will check out those socks.

    Thanks so much!
     
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  9. Amy Brooks

    Amy Brooks Active Member

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    Wily

    Thanks as always for the info - so I should definitely go a size up sounds like - and get some of those socks. I will check it out. Did you train with this regimen?

    Thanks
    Amy
     
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  10. hindsfeet

    hindsfeet Collect moments, not things

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    Amy, I am confident you will find what works for you. Like most of us state, when you are JUST starting to feel a hot spot, do something about it. :D
     
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  11. Wily

    Wily Francés 2016; Portugués 2017; Inglés/Fisterra 2018

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    Hey Amy - Let me preface my training comments with letting you know that I’m an exercise junkie! I workout at least five days a week either running, cycling/spinning, or at the gym lifting or in exercise classes. So, because of my lifestyle, I don’t need to train specifically for a Camino since exercise is part of my daily routine.

    With that said, let me say that from a physical standpoint, the CP is not particularly demanding as it is primarily flat walking. If you were doing the CF, I would have different suggestions. However, from where you plan on starting, I think I remember you mentioning Coimbra, up to Santiago is approximately 230 miles. That’s a lot of walking day after day. So, I think the training issue has more to do with endurance than it has to do with being prepared for tough terrain. Between Porto and Santiago there is only one hill of any particular size, Alta da Portela Grande, and that’s only an elevation change of 250 meters.

    My wife primarily trained for the CP by walking a great deal and she takes spin classes at our gym. To help prepare herself, much of her walking was done wearing a weighted vest to simulate a pack. Walking and spinning a couple months prior to our Camino put her in great shape for the walk. She prepared in a similar way last year before walking the Inglés and on to Finisterre. The problems she had with her knees on the CP were due to the cobblestones which training couldn’t anticipate.

    So, from my perspective, I would advise everyone to prepare for any endurance outing including a Camino. The better the shape you are in, the easier the walk. A single day’s walk isn’t particularly tough, but keep in mind you’ll be doing it day after day. So, strengthening your legs, getting used to carrying a load, and just basically increasing your endurance will help make the Camino easier and more enjoyable. But, you don’t have to go crazy with your training. Between now and May put more activity into your routine and build up strength and endurance. I know you’ll do just fine. Bom Caminho!
     
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  12. davebugg

    davebugg DustOff: "When I Have Your Wounded"

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    Hi, Amy. . .

    I've posted two different writings of mine dealing with blister prevention and purchasing shoes.

    ---------------------

    Blisters are a product of friction.... often referred to as shear force friction. The skin of your foot, and the sock that is in contact with that area of skin, are sliding and rubbing together.

    Strategies for the prevention of shear force friction and blisters have changed and matured over recent years.

    1. A properly fitting shoe. In brief, it needs to be long enough and wide enough to accommodate any insoles, orthotics, metatarsal pads, etc, PLUS the socks that you will be wearing, PLUS the increased pressure on the feet from wearing a loaded pack.
    2. Light padded Merino wool sock designed for walking or backpacking, or the same type of sock in a good synthetic blend. A heavy pad on a sock allows potentially more movement against the skin, takes longer to air out, and takes longer to dry when washed.
    3. A sock fit that is snug and form fitting to the foot, but not gangrene-inducing tight. You want the shear force to be between the sock and the interior of the shoe, not the sock and the skin. A snug fitting sock will help to make that happen.
    4. Allow the shoe to move over the sock a bit. By keeping the shoes a bit looser on the feet, the sock will take the brunt of the shear force. If a shoe is tied snug, then that forces the foot to move more in the sock, which means the sock and skin are absorbing the shear force. An exception occurs on long downhill grades; the shoes need to be tied tight enough to keep your toes from hitting the front of the shoe which can cause injury and trauma to the nail bed and toe joints.
    5. While there are foot lubricants, from Body Glide and Hiker's Goo to plain old vaseline, they have a fairly short viable working span as the material rubs off of the skin and is absorbed by the socks. For prophylactic protection from shear force friction to blister prone areas on the feet, a long lasting barrier is the better option. The placement of tapes, like Leukotape P, or moleskin-type products, if adhered correctly, will last the whole day.
    6. To apply tapes and moleskin type products,
      1. Clean off the area of application with a bit of alcohol to remove grease, dirt, and body oils. A bit of regular hand sanitizer works for this, in addition to hand cleansing.
      2. Cut a piece of your chosen barrier material to fit the area you want protected; be sure to cut rounded corners rather than square in order to help the material from rolling up away from the skin.
      3. Apply a thin smear of Tincture of Benzoin to the skin area where the adhesive will stick. This will increase the holding power of the tape or moleskin.
        1. If the tape or moleskin, etc. is going on top of a blistered area, avoid getting the Benzoin on the roof area of the blister, and add a thin coating of ointment/vaseline onto the blister roof, avoiding the surrounding skin area. This will allow removal of the product without hurting the blister wound.
      4. Place the barrier on the area, taking care to not handle the adhesive; spend a bit of time rubbing the material to create friction so that the adhesive will heat up and adhere more firmly.
      5. At the end of the day, remove the barrier and use some alcohol to wipe the area that was covered.
        1. Since fungus (athletes foot) and pathogens splash around in showers, shower shoes are not necessarily preventative to one's feet being exposed or infected. It is helpful to use an alcohol or astringent product applied to the feet after showering.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The most important theme for achieving a proper fit is: You do not choose a shoe based on measurements, you buy a shoe based on its Fit N Feel regardless of instrument measurements.

    1. When you go to the store, do so toward the end of the day.... you will have been up on your feet, so that will help with getting the correct fit. Additionally, you will need to wear the same backpack with the same gear you will be carrying... you want this additional weight on you as this will put the same downward pressure on the foot that you will be having while on Camino.
    2. Wear the exact same sock(s) you will be wearing while you are walking on the Camino. And if you have a special insole or orthotic, bring it with you.
    3. At the store, the measuring that will be done on your feet is only to get you in the ballpark for the correct shoe size.
    4. Start by standing up; never measure while sitting. You want the full weight of your body, with the pack on, to put the same pressure on your feet to spread them out as will happen while walking. That alone will increase the volume and size of your feet.
    5. Make sure those 'Camino' socks are on your feet; if you wear socks with liners while walking, do the same thing at the store.
    6. While standing, have someone near to you that you can use to steady yourself. With the measuring device on the ground, step onto the instrument and center all of your weight onto the foot being measured. Do the same for the other foot.
    7. Start with that size, but be aware that both the width and the length need to feel like there is adequate room for your feet. Ideally, like Goldilocks, everything will be just right. But, don't count on it. Be picky.
    8. If you have special insoles or orthotics, put them into any shoe you try on as they will take up space inside the shoe.
    9. When you find what you think will fit you well, you will need to see if your toes have enough clearance. Toes should not be able to be forced to the front of the shoe and touch the shoe. Not even a little. If they do, long walking and downhill grades on the trail or path or road will traumatize the bed of the nail, and that is when toenails can blacken and fall off.
    10. With your shoes tied securely, but not too tight, walk around the store with your pack on. Go up stairs and down stairs, scuff the shoes to the floor so that your feet are forced to do any movement they will do and see if your toes so much as butterfly kiss the front of the shoe. Kick the front of the shoe into a post or stair or wall or someone's shin.... does that make any of your toes touch the front of the shoe? That goes for all the little piggies.
    11. Next, pay attention to the width of the shoe. It shouldn't feel snug on the sides and there should be no rubbing or pressure points at all. They will not go away with "break in". They will create soreness, pain, and blistering. Even if it seems to be tolerable, it is like water torture; as your feet are continually exposed to those pressure points your feet will break down against them bit by bit, and bruising, blisters, and soreness will follow.
    12. You may need to go up a size to a size and a half in length, and go with a wider width to avoid those things I mentioned above. The notion that one avoids blisters by wearing snug footwear has been shown to do just the opposite.
     
  13. BROWNCOUNTYBOB

    BROWNCOUNTYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Amy, my wife and I have walked Camino Frances the full 800 kms two times and will walk it a third time this fall. We read advice on this website extensively. Following the advice, my wife and I went to a local REI in Indianapolis. She asked an expert in hiking shoes to advise her. She tried on several different models and settled on Vasque high sided hiking boots. They seemed the most comfortable and were a size larger to accommodate two sets of socks and for swelling of her feet. She had about six months to break them in and felt the Vasque boots were ready for the camino.

    Wrong. First day over Napoleon Route she developed blisters, and over the next several days the blisters got worse, but not to the point of requiring medical treatment. I doctored her feet each night and over time the blisters disappeared. However, it cased her to walk differently to avoid more hot spots and blisters. Within 7 to 10 days, she started to develop swelling and knee pain. When we arrived at Carrion de los Condes, another experienced pilgrim and advised that she begin shipping her backpack ahead via Jako Trans. She did the rest of the camino and we made it to Santiago. She still had knee pain when we returned home and learned that she developed a stress fracture in her knee and one heel.

    In terms of hiking socks, we both wore silk liners (purchased from REI) and slightly padded Icebreaker merino wool socks on both caminos and these worked very well for us both time.

    Along our first camino, we always took note of others' hiking boots and asked other pilgrims how they liked them. We ran into a fitness coach from France and he raved about his Soloman trail running shoes. I wrote it down in my notebook. I bought her a set for Christmas and she wore these on our second camino. Besides the change in shoes, she used lambs wool between her toes and foot glide as the others have suggested. We tried Compeed once or twice and some pilgrims swear by it to protect the blister. We didn't like it, since it can become a soupy mess after awhile.

    In terms of fitness, we mostly agree with the advice of Wily. My wife and I work out five days a week alternating between treadmill and elliptical. We believed if we were generally fit, we'd be able to adapt and become trail hiking fit. So we did not walk our neighborhood with backpacks on, using trekking poles, etc. In both caminos, we adjusted fine.

    The best advice we received was "walk your own camino" and "listen to your body". When you are tired, stop and take a rest. When you feel you are developing a hot spot, stop, take off your shoes and socks and treat your feet then. Walk your own pace, it's not a competition, so no need to keep up with others that walk a faster pace. When it is raining, try to keep your feet as dry as possible (gaiters / rain pants).

    Best wishes for success on your upcoming camino. My wife and I can't wait to begin our third camino in mid-September. Bob
     
  14. danvo

    danvo Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Hallo @Amy Brooks I add to you one more alternative - sandals :) I walked CF in sandals, (except parts through Pyrenees, Cruz de ferro and O'Cebreiro) up to Finisterre and Muxia, and whole CP, from Porto. (This Camino with my wife, she walked in sandals too) - without any blister. (CF walked in june, CP in july) I walked in Teva Terraluxe and in Teva Terra Fi4 sandals, my wife in these Merrells: https://www.jdsports.co.uk/product/merrell-terran-lattice-sandals-womens/202319/ Buen Camino!!
     
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  15. Amy Brooks

    Amy Brooks Active Member

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    Wily

    Thanks for the words of advice and encouragement. I am trying to get in as many back to backs as I can - no way to replicate the day by day wear and tear on the body that I will experience on the Camino but as you say - the more in shape I am the better the experience. And all that Portuguese food and wine will taste all the better.

    I have been training on the hills around my town - but from what you say - I should not worry too much about ups and downs. Save that for my CF trip!

    Thanks again for all the advice and good cheer.

    Amy
     
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  16. Amy Brooks

    Amy Brooks Active Member

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    Daniel

    I was going to bring my Teva's as my evening footwear - sounds like I may be able to walk in those some or all of the time... I will do some training walks in mine to see if that will work. I love my Salomon's though. :) .

    Any recommendations for my CP route?

    Thanks so much
    Amy
     
  17. Amy Brooks

    Amy Brooks Active Member

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    Dave

    This is fantastic! I have copied and pasted this into my word document of great advice I am gathering - thank you so much for this.

    Cheers
    Amy
     
  18. Amy Brooks

    Amy Brooks Active Member

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    Country Bob

    Thank you so much for your thoughtful advice and thoughts. I am so sorry your wife had that painful experience on your first Camino. what a bummer. I need to start training with the liners that everyone is speaking of...

    I am excited to take your advice about walking "my" Camino. In all my training walks - I have really found a very comfortable 3 miles/hour pace - I have tried to push myself to walk faster but it doesn't feel "right"... so 3 mph it is. Even on my longest planned day I should be fine. And I have built in an extra day so I have flexibility to rest a day if needed.

    I am excited to hear about your third Camino - what route? If all goes well in May - I am already planning to do the CF in 2020... probably in Fall. We shall see.

    Thanks again!
    Amy
     
  19. BROWNCOUNTYBOB

    BROWNCOUNTYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Amy,
    Cindi and I will walk Camino Frances again - our third time. We recall during our first camino speaking with a pilgrim from Barcelona. He said he was walking the camino frances for the tenth time. We asked him why he kept repeating camino frances, rather than selecting another camino route. He said that each time he walks the camino frances, it is an entirely different experience for him, which he enjoys. We have adopted that same philosophy.

    For example, our first camino everything was new to us. As a necessity, Cindi learned about Jako Trans and shipped her backpack ahead allowing her to complete our camino. We mostly stayed in municipal albergues. We learned which clothing and gear worked for us, which did not or what we were missing. We tried a few new foods which we had not tasted before and absolutely loved them. These included morcilla (spanish blood sausage), caldo gallego, and pulpo. Prior to the camino, we only made a few reservations in advance.

    Our second camino including walking with my brother and his wife the full 800 caminos. We stayed in several albergues, and lots of private albergues with private rooms and quad rooms. We liked the flexibility of walking with my brother and his wife some days, and other days allowing them to walk ahead, so just Cindi and I walked together. My wife left her Vasque boots in Indianapolis and walked blister free to Santiago in her Soloman trail running shoes. We made reservations in advance for all nights except 4 places and did not experience a single glitch - the hiking stages were doable and we had no problems staying at places we reserved.

    For our upcoming third camino, which starts in St Jean mid-September, we begin our trip in Barcelona (last two we began in Madrid) to enjoy the city highlights. We are allowing 37 hiking days from St Jean to Santiago and have made reservations 100% of the nights (no rest days). Of the 37 nights, we are staying in 29 private albergues / hotels / paradors which will be new to us. We will have private rooms with private baths every night. This allows us to leave our sleeping bags behind. Also, having walked every step of the first two caminos with my Osprey backpack, I will ship it ahead to our destination for the more demanding stages with tough uphill climbs. We will also hike a few alternative routes that will be new to us, such as the route to Samos.

    So while this is our third camino frances, it will provide many new experiences for us. During our last camino we enjoyed walking through towns that were familiar to us, revisiting some of our favorite restaurants, and staying at a few albergue we really loved. Can't wait to enjoy the camino frances again.

    Bob
     
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  20. raymond john

    raymond john Well-Known Member

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    Davebugg
    Two excellent articles on blister prevention and buying walking shoes/ boots which are full of sound advice. It reminded when was
    I was looking into walking the camino as a novice for the 1st time which was prior to the camino forum webb site . On surfing the webb ,I found Leslie Gilmore webb site, It was an easy read and contained a lot of useful information on the camino Albergues, Packing lists, Training, etc and Boot selection which wasn't so detailed as your lists. I used this as a guide for buying walk boots, he also made the point very well, it was essential to select the correct boots. "Look after your feet and they will look after you." I spent some time going to a number of retailers looking at various boots. In the end I chose some boots from shop called Cotswolds who have numerous outlets thought the UK. They spent a lot of time measuring my feet length /width, checking if I had flat feet. I mention I was going to walk the camino and about the very mixed terrain and variable weather conditions. I also said that I wanted to choose correct boots for my feet and not be price driven. i.e. I didn't want to know the price of boot until I found the best boots for me
    They offered two boots which they considered were best me. There procedure for trying on the boots was very thorough checking the boots fitted correctly and felt comfortable, then making me walk around the shop up and down the stairs and small bridge type ramp with rocks, they also showed me how to tie my boots correctly. They recommend I took both pairs home for a trial period and wear them for 2/3 hours at a time around the house. The boots I finally selected were Scarpa 9 1/2 size, 1 1/2 bigger than my 8 shoe size. they felt the most comfortable. I also found sock selection was important after a lot of trial and error with single and 2 socks combinations. I found Bridgestone marino wool socks worked best for me.

    I don't know if it was luck or good fortune . I have never suffered with blisters when walking the camino.I always put vaseline on my feet each day and removed my boots to air my feet when stopping for a short brake or lunch. However, my feet still felt tired at the end of a days walking.

    You are correct in choosing boots, in the end its not about measurement which is a good starting point, but more about what you feel more comfortable wearing & walking . You will also find the cut of boots manufactures vary considerably and therefore some makes will fit your feet more comfortably than others.



    Carpe Diem

    Raymond John
     
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  21. davebugg

    davebugg DustOff: "When I Have Your Wounded"

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    Thank you, John.

    It is wonderful to have footwear which suits one and fits well and is comfortable. Boots served me during several decades of wilderness backpacking throughout the Rockies, Cascades, Sierra Nevada, and in various GRs in Europe. I am writing the following not as a criticism of anyone's choice in footwear; indeed, I wear boots in certain situations. Nor is it my intent to tell anyone to abandon the type of footwear which they are wedded to.

    It is important to note, however, that as with the many changes in technologies and utility, practical choices in footwear for backpacking and hiking have evolved past traditional thinking and choices as well.

    About a year before I did my thru-hike on the Pacific Crest Trail several years ago, I was hired by New Balance to gear test a pair of their trail running shoes: the Leadville. After 4 months putting them thru their paces for a quality control assessment, I decided to abandon my hiking boots for three season backpacking. Now I have more than four thousand miles using trail runners in some of the most rugged of terrain while doing long distance backpacking, as well as on Caminos.

    While I use trail runners and stability-controlled running shoes for my spring, summer, and fall backpacking, I still use my Lowa Camino boots for winter backpacking with heavy snow and ice because of the obvious higher level of insulation and the ability to attach crampons.

    It is interesting to note that over the last 7 years, the largest percentage of long distance backpackers and thru-hikers have converted from traditional backpacking boots to using a running or trail running shoe.

    The military studies on fatigue and footwear have determined that, on average, one pound on the foot is equal to five pounds carried on the back. At nearly three and a half pounds per pair of boots, that means over 17 pounds. At an average weight of 1.75 pounds per pair of trail runners, wearing a trail runner drops that weight to 5.25 pounds

    The practical issues for less experienced and fit pilgrims are several. Excess fatigue and wear on the legs can obviously drain energy quicker, making for a more tiring day of walking. However, the frequency of issues, such as shin splints, knee pain, ankle strain, and blistering rises with higher levels of work to the legs, which is increased by heavier than needed footwear.

    There are several other issues regarding boots versus trail runners and shoes.

    They can, in fact, exacerbate the risk of injury. A foot in a boot is sitting higher off the ground than when in a shoe because the outer and midsoles are much thicker and built up. Additionally, the outer sole of boots are trimmed closer to shell of the boot, meaning that the outer sole has a fairly narrow profile. Both of these factors have been shown to have a higher risk of the footwear 'rolling' when stepping on an unstable surface or piece of debris like loose rocks or uneven surfaces.

    As the boot begins to roll, the boot carries the foot with it, the higher material of the boot above the ankle exerts more force against the foot to make it roll with the boot. That material is not stiff enough to keep from flexing, which means that your ankle is going to start bending as the roll of the boot continues. And because the foot is higher off the ground inside the boot, the ankle can be forced into a more significant bending.

    Another factor about boots that helps lead to injury is their weight. The heavier the weight that the foot and lower legs need to lift, the more stress and fatigue the ankles and supporting structures are exposed to. Such weakens the ability of the ankle structures to maintain resiliency.

    Trail shoes and trail runners, on the other hand, do the opposite when confronted with the same type of uneven surface or debris. The outer and midsoles are much closer to the ground. They are also wider than the shoe making for a contact point with the ground that is more stable. Their much lighter weight keeps ankle structures from fatiguing.

    Now here is the thing researchers found as most significant: A foot in a shoe that is kept a bit loose can compensate, to a large degree, when the shoe starts to roll off of an uneven surface. As the shoe rolls, the shoe tends to slip around the foot. In other words, the shoe moves around the foot for the most part, so the ankle won't immediately bend out of place with the shoe. This allows the wearer of the shoe to have enough time to react to the rolling and twisting shoe to keep the ankle from injurious strain.

    Yes, there are people who get ankle injuries in trail shoes and trail runners. But those injuries are less frequent and less severe, on an average, than with a foot encased in an above the ankle hiking boot.

    My preference, and my recommendation for those who consult with me as beginners, is to focus their search on trail running shoes. If they find that trail runners are not a good match, then explore trail/hiking shoes, similar to Oboz or some Merrills. Focus on the lightest weight, broadest outersole, and ability to dry quickly when wet.
     
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  22. UnkleHammy

    UnkleHammy Well-Known Member

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    I strongly recommend that you search this Web site for all items posted by @davebugg . All of them are well thought out and useful. His writings on equipment are some of the best I have ever seen. (And the are free!)
     
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  23. danvo

    danvo Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Amy, as evening footwear we used flip-flops. In albergues you must (mostly) change your footwear, so no sandals "everywhere".
    I do not have recommendations about CP - there are more ways from Porto, we don't walked along ocean, so there is only one thing which I want to point of: Cobblestones. They are everywhere and walking on it is after 25 - 25km quite painful. Coastal route is maybe better? This is question to other pilgrims :) Bom Caminho !
     
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  24. Amy Brooks

    Amy Brooks Active Member

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    Bob

    I am so excited you are heading back for your third Camino. I have not met one person who has done the Camino who did not love it... and want to do it again.

    I am intrigued that you have made 100% reservations... I love researching places and Booking.com makes it so easy to reserve. But I wasn't sure if that is risky - I know others have booked while on the Way... one or two days ahead of time. Since this is your third time - you know what works for you and I am sure the comfort of knowing where you are sleeping that evening is quite nice.

    For my first Camino and since I am doing the slightly less traveled CP - I will probably follow Brierley's stages - I also decided last night to continue onto to Finisterre - I had some extra days and rather than walk more on pavement in Portugal - I am opting to do the four plus days from Santiago to the coast. It sounds lovely.

    I can't wait to hear about your 3rd Camino Bob!

    Amy
     
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  25. Wily

    Wily Francés 2016; Portugués 2017; Inglés/Fisterra 2018

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    Hey Amy - Glad to hear that you’re adding on Finisterre to your Camino. It’s a great four day walk to the coast! We thoroughly enjoyed walking to “the end of the world.” We broke up the journey a bit differently than Brierley suggested which for us in some pretty heavy rain worked out well. From Finisterre back to Santiago, you can easily catch the bus in the center of town.

    Regarding Booking.com, it worked like a charm for our Caminos. No risk involved at all, so don’t worry about that. Every reservation we made along The Way was set for us when we arrived. Because we altered our pace on the CP due to Nancy’s knee problems, our inns and albergues were very accomodating to change our reservations at the last minute with no additional fees. If there is a place you want to stay that isn’t linked in with Booking.com, just drop them a simple email requesting beds or a room. Almost everyone that I have written to responded very quickly and positively. There was never a problem with any reservation that I made from home. Or, most hospitaleros where you’ll be staying will graciously call ahead for you if you are looking for beds for the next night or two. The system all works quite nicely. Bom Caminho!
     
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  26. Amy Brooks

    Amy Brooks Active Member

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    [My preference, and my recommendation for those who consult with me as beginners, is to focus their search on trail running shoes. If they find that trail runners are not a good match, then explore trail/hiking shoes, similar to Oboz or some Merrills. Focus on the lightest weight, broadest outersole, and ability to dry quickly when wet.[/QUOTE]
    Dave

    Wow - this is one of the most interesting posts on footwear I have ever read. I have found a difference if I walk 16 or more miles in my running shoes versus my Salomon's - I do feel like the extra something that came with the Salomon's did help with foot fatigue. I am walking on flat trails or around town on pavement so very little risk of ankle rolling.

    I have taken good notes on your earlier post on how to prepare for and do a fitting at REI. I am hoping to get in there this weekend after a training walk...

    Thank you so much for all your thoughtful advice Dave - I have learned so much.

    Amy
     
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  27. davebugg

    davebugg DustOff: "When I Have Your Wounded"

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    Amy, you are welcome. :)

    If you wouldn't mind, what does the foot fatigue feel like when you experience it? Also, which of the Solomon's do you favor? I spent quite a bit of time doing a quality control gear test for Solomon with their XA Pro 3D trail shoes last year.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2019
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  28. Wily

    Wily Francés 2016; Portugués 2017; Inglés/Fisterra 2018

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    Great shoe information on this thread! Sandals, hikers, and trail runners! Depending on your particular feet and preferences, a lot of excellent choices are out there for comfortable feet during your Camino! Most likely, no bad choices at all! It all depends on what works best for you. Happy feet; Happy Camino!
     
  29. Amy Brooks

    Amy Brooks Active Member

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    Dave

    The fatigue is from walking long mils with my running shoes which I have to admit are worn out - and need replacing. These are Nike Pegasus - fatigue I experience is on the soles of my feet - tender and sore.

    I have not had that experience with my Salomon's.

    I just purchased another pair of Salomon's from REI yesterday - I tried multiple shoes from lightweight low cut hiking shoes to trail runners and settled on another pair of Salomon's x ultra's. If I could give feedback to Salomon - please tell them to bring back shoelaces...

    I am taking these babies out today for a 15 miler (if I can get out of work in time) - I will let you know how they do.

    Thanks everyone again for your great advice and help.

    Amy
     
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  30. Wily

    Wily Francés 2016; Portugués 2017; Inglés/Fisterra 2018

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    Hey Pilgrims - Just to add a little more information to this discussion on trail running shoes, here’s last year’s Runner’s World recommendations that some of you might helpful to go along with Dave’s comments.

    https://www.runnersworld.com/gear/a22115120/best-trail-running-shoes/

    The Salomon Ultras that Amy referenced are among the numerous recommendations. Good hiking and Buen Camino!
     
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