Welcome to the Camino de Santiago forum. This community is here to help you with questions on walking any of the Camino routes. Hopefully you too will stay and help others after you have been on your Camino.

If you register and login you are shown no Google adverts. Please note we also use cookies on this forum – not for anything evil but to allow you to login and use the forum software. We do not collect personal data and never pass your details on to anyone. Come and joins us on your pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela.

How Do I Aleviate Hot And Burning Feet

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by TKC, Apr 9, 2017.

  1. TKC

    TKC New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2017
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Good morning, I have been training in preparation for my Camino pilgrimage in May. I am only doing the last 100 km but know that foot care and comfort is essential. I have smartwool socks which I am very pleased with for the wicking properties and comfort. I am wearing Columbia hiking shoes with gortex. I do have a pair of Teva sandal which I plan on trying partway through my next long walk. My feet sweat quite a bit and after the 1 1/-2 hour mark my feet begin to burn with heat, no blisters or sore spots but very hot. Once I remove my shoes my feet instantly feel better and when the socks come off they feel wonderful. Is there something I can do to help with this problem? Thank you from Theresa
     
  2. Crepes4Suzette

    Crepes4Suzette Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2016
    Messages:
    199
    Likes Received:
    426
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Theresa, sounds like you're doing the right things. That's about the 2 hour mark where some recommend sitting at a rest stop and taking your shoes and socks off to air them and rest anyway. When mine feel like that at the END of the day, although it sounds counterintuitive, I soak them in the hottest water I can stand for several minutes and they always feel better. Although it also sounds counter-intuitive, the Marines use nylon knee-highs under socks to reduce friction (rolled down, I'm assuming:0)). You could also try other friction-reducing products like Vaseline or Glide. I didn't like using Vaseline, but some do. The burning - if it isn't related to neuropathy - might be from friction and swelling, so whatever else you can to do reduce those might help.

    I used hiking shoes with some areas of breathable fabric on the first 2 Caminos and did OK with 1/2 size larger than usual AND the wide version of the shoe. This year I'm training in trail runners and am finding them much lighter and more flexible and more comfortable. All won't agree about trail runners vs hiking shoes though, and there are several places at least on the Camino Frances where having sturdy support will help. Best wishes to you for solving the issue and happy planning!
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2017
  3. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2016
    Messages:
    1,154
    Likes Received:
    1,969
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Upstate New York
    Hey Theresa - C4S is spot on with her advice. Let me just reinforce a couple points she makes and add a couple other thoughts.

    My feet don't generally get all that hot unless I'm walking on asphalt all day. This generally won't be a problem from Sarria in except on possibly your last day. From Pedrouzo to the cathedral in Santiago, you will have to walk in asphalt for quite a few kilometers. My solution, as C4S does too, is to air out your feet every time you take a break. My wife and I just finished walking the Portugués last week. Roughly every two hours, or as cafes presented themselves, we rested which included taking off our shoes and socks to let everything air out. We also changed to a fresh pair of shocks daily about mid-walk. In terms of foot preparation every morning, we applied Body Glide to our feet to reduce moisture and friction.

    You should be fine with your Columbia hiking shoes as long as they are well broken in and they fit. As you already know, good wool socks are a must as well. C4S choice of trail running shoes this Camino should serve her equally well. One sees a lot of running shoes on the Camino. I, too, like the fact that they are a lighter shoe and the trail version have excellent tread. The terrain on the CF does not require a heavy duty hiking boot. Either a good hiking shoe or trail running shoe will work just fine. The only thing that I would make sure of for either type of shoe is that they were Gor-tex lined. My wettest day on the Camino was in Galicia two days out of Santiago. Gor-tex lined shoes and gaitors will help keep your feet dry on days when you encounter heavy rain.

    I'm confident you will have a great walk from Sarria to Santiago. Break regularly and air out your shoes, socks, and feet. If you were to get blisters, attend to them immediately so as to keep them small. Buen Camino!
     
  4. hindsfeet

    hindsfeet Donating Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    158
    Trophy Points:
    33
    Location:
    Arizona
    Theresa, great information from C4S and Wily. I started training in Columbia hiking shoes, but after
    a few hours my feet started burning also. No blisters or hot spots, just whole foot burning.
    I take baby wipes with me while hiking, stop, massage my feet with them to cool them down.
    But after a while it would start again. Longed for a cool creek to dip them in but in the desert
    only saw mirages!! ha! The boots were large enough and had a wide toe box, so that wasn't
    the problem. Switched to Montrail Enduro insoles. Helped quite a bit. But I eventually
    ditched the leather hiking shoes and started hiking in breathable, proper ventilated trail
    runners. That was the key for me. You said that you were going to try your Teva sandals
    next....bet you get relief from wearing those. Strange, but I noticed that you can always
    tell by the look on peoples faces if their feet hurt! Wish for you cool feet!
     
  5. Greg Canning

    Greg Canning Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2015
    Messages:
    164
    Likes Received:
    334
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Dublin
    I suppose everyone's feet are different. On reading the original post I was thinking at first, maybe try a bigger shoe size or use smartwool socks but it seems that Theresa has already thought of those solutions. This year with the Smartwool socks my partner and I didn't have to change our socks at all during the day but then again it was at the end of March early April so temperatures weren't very high and we did not encounter any really big climbs. My partner wore the Columbia Outdry's and she had no problems either.

    All I can offer is to recognise that it is an issue for you. Maybe go to your local outdoor store and talk to their "shoe person". You may find it is a problem they've encountered in the past and many of them are trained by the shoe/sock manufacturers to offer good advice to the customer.

    In the meantime the advice about taking breaks, resting and/or refreshing your feet and perhaps changing socks half-way through the day will help.

    Hope you find a solution.

    Buen Camino

    Greg
     
  6. Gerry Vandermaat

    Gerry Vandermaat Donating Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2015
    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    196
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Newcastle Australia
    Home Page:
    Oh for a cool stream to dip your feet into - mmm sounds good Hindsfeet -- found the perfect one just before Rabanal.
     

    Attached Files:

    Crepes4Suzette, hindsfeet and Wily like this.
  7. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2016
    Messages:
    1,154
    Likes Received:
    1,969
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Upstate New York
    Never pass up a good chance to soak your feet! Just enjoyed such an exoerience a week ago in Caldas de Reis right in the middle of town! How good is that?
     
    Crepes4Suzette and hindsfeet like this.
  8. hindsfeet

    hindsfeet Donating Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    158
    Trophy Points:
    33
    Location:
    Arizona
    That's what I'm talking about. Plan to take advantage of those cool streams. Is it safe to
    drink from them also? Take a dip? Wait and spot any animals?
     
  9. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2016
    Messages:
    1,154
    Likes Received:
    1,969
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Upstate New York
    Hey Hindsfeet - I'd probably err on the cautious side regarding drinking from any outside sourse unless it specifically indicated that it was good for drinking. The last thing you want to do is get sick! Of course, there's the wine tap at Irache to look forward to. Fill your scallop shell there and enjoy! Buen Camino!
     
  10. hindsfeet

    hindsfeet Donating Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    158
    Trophy Points:
    33
    Location:
    Arizona
    Yea Wily, you are right. Do not want to take a chance and get sick. My scallop shell is quite
    shallow. Maybe an extra conch shell on hand... for Irache..hmmm. Too HEAVY!! ha
     
    Wily, Greg Canning and Crepes4Suzette like this.
  11. Gerry Vandermaat

    Gerry Vandermaat Donating Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2015
    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    196
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Newcastle Australia
    Home Page:
    This is the best tap to drink from ---
     

    Attached Files:

    UnkleHammy, hindsfeet, Wily and 2 others like this.
  12. Greg Canning

    Greg Canning Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2015
    Messages:
    164
    Likes Received:
    334
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Dublin
    I'd probably stick to the Fuentes for filling my water bottle. Not sure how safe the streams would be. After all you are walking through a lot of agricultural land.

    But as for wildlife you will get the chance to see lots. Plenty of red kites, buzzards (not the American kind), hawks and other birds. On our most recent Camino we came across deer on the path and when crossing the Rio Odra outside Castrojeriz we spotted an otter in the river. We also saw a lone wild boar, thankfully a bit of a distance away.

    Buen Camino

    Greg
     
    UnkleHammy, hindsfeet and Wily like this.

Share This Page