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How Far Do You Walk A Day?

Discussion in 'Camino Frances' started by stevelm1, Jun 6, 2015.

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How far do you plan to walk a day (or did walk a day)?

  1. 10 or less miles a day (16 km)

    4.3%
  2. 15 or less miles a day (24 km)

    65.2%
  3. 20 or less miles a day (32 km)

    21.7%
  4. More than 20 miles a day

    8.7%
  1. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey Hindsfeet - I developed bad blisters last year, but it wasn't necessarily due to the downhill sections. Yes, all those things you mentioned above can help you if you were to develop blisters. Luckily for me, as large as my blisters were, they never got infected. I was able to keep on walking although some days, my feet really hurt. The one thing that I didn't find helpful was Compeed. Others may swear by it, but not me. I think that I could have contained my blisters better had I opened them and used paper pharmaceutical tape right when they started. My Camino taught me a great deal about foot care just as I'm sure yours will. If you do need any assistance while in Spain, I found the people in the pharmacies to be very knowledgeable and helpful. I joked with my Camino buddies that I believe that I was the winner of last year's Big Blister Contest. That's an award I don't want to receive a second time. Ultreia!
     
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  2. stevelm1

    stevelm1 The Happy Peregrino Donating Member

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    Get boots that are at least a size too large. Train, train, train in your boots, socks and pack and you will avoid most blisters (at least I did). That will help you to keep your toenails and make going down hill much more comfortable. I did not walk in sandals so I am no help there.
     
  3. Orava

    Orava Active Member

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    Blisters - I have been blister free on 2 caminos (so blister free 1200 km). Plenty of blisters in pre camino training though - So I suppose my lesson would be to get them during training sessions and take a pair of battle weary callused feet on camino. I have also shortened my stride compared to pre camino days...seems to help also.
     
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  4. hindsfeet

    hindsfeet Donating Member Donating Member

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    Great info, thanks so much. I was wondering if I should just get my feet tough with calluses before the walk. I will experiment. Gee, there goes my foot modeling career! Ha..........
     
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  5. stevelm1

    stevelm1 The Happy Peregrino Donating Member

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    I know a woman who built up her foot calluses on the Camino and when she got home she had a pedicure and had them removed. Her next hike she got blisters. Calluses are not cute, but they do serve a function. Good luck with your experiments and Camino.
     
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  6. hindsfeet

    hindsfeet Donating Member Donating Member

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    Hi Stevelm1, Yes....you are right. I just got a pedicure and removed the present calluses. But from here on out I am going to accept my calluses as hiking equipment and safety protection. And save money at the salon! Ha!!
     
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  7. Newforest john

    Newforest john Member

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    When walking the south west coastal path, I usually walk for somewhere around 15 miles per day. I'm sure many walk for loner on the camino however the swcp is a tough roller coaster of a hike and after 15 miles I'm ready for my tent. I'm not sure how far I'm going to walk each day on the camino but I will aim for 15 miles and see how I feel. My body will tell me what I can do and I've learnt to listen...
     
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  8. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey John - A 15 mile/24 km day on the Camino Francés is pretty typical. That puts you on pace to making it to Santiago in about the 34 days as Brierley suggests. Although I had a few shorter 20 km days last year, that was offset by a few longer 30+ days as well. Of course, some days are tougher or easier than others due to the terrain. In fact, the seventy-five kilometers from SJPP to Pamplona are tiring enough that I woukd recommend a rest day at this point. But, in general, a 15 mile/day plan is very reasonable. One of the nice things about the infrastructure of the CF is that if you want to pull up a bit short of your destination or walk on further, there are on most stages towns/albergues every few kilometers making it relatively easy to add or subtract kilometers from your walk on any given day. Buen Camino!
     
  9. Maya Grandmother

    Maya Grandmother Active Member

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    In 2015, I walked the CF. The shortest day was 12km to Volcarlos and the longest day was 34.7 to Carrion de Los Condes. It took me 35 days with 1 rest day in Astorga. I was a slow walker with everyone passing me but quite often met up again at the albergue in the evening. I had many blisters mostly in the toe area. I pricked them everyday because if I did not they would hurt too much to continue. Like Wily, I experienced compeed to be overrated but some people made good use of them. I ended up throwing my expensive orthotics in the garbage and bought thinner insoles and then about 3weeks in (a Korean lady mentioned this idea) to put in a ladies pad under every foot which gave me extra protection plus I did taping every morning. Your body will tell you when it is enough for the day. Going downhill did take a toll on my feet as I lost toenails. Even today when I walk I feel like my nail is going to fall off but the next day when I stop walking they start to get better. For me these hardships were part of my journey and the camino is pulling me back for another trek. Buen camino everyone.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2017
  10. David Fletcher

    David Fletcher Member

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    I did the Camino as part of my turning 60. I was moderately prepared, but hills confounded me (especially leaving SJPP, where I was ever-so-glad to stay at Orisson). Most days I walked 20-25 km, starting around 07:00 and stopping between 13:00 and 14:00, which would give me some time for siesta and visiting the town or village. I bussed into Burgos and Leon, simply to avoid the industrial hinterland, but still managed to put 15 km on my pedometer by walking around the cities. I had planned on 40 days, finished in 37 (Santiago, not Fisterre). My feet were fine (a couple of hot-spots and bruised toes that didn't blister during the first week). I used a Jaco-trans (pack service) a few times when I just wanted to walk.
     
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  11. hindsfeet

    hindsfeet Donating Member Donating Member

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    That is great David, walking the Camino at a milestone in your life! It sounds like you listened to your
    body and walked accordingly. Would you do it again? And would you change anything, about your
    training or walk? I am excited about my own future experience on the Camino, and I am sure some unknown
    surprises on the way, which I will embrace. But I also want to be wise and glean what I can from fellow
    pilgrims! Thanks.
     
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  12. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey Hindsfeet - Let me just reinforce a couple good points David makes above. His daily schedule of roughly starting around 7:00 and finishing between 13:00-14:00 worked for me as well. Six to seven hours of walking is plenty of time to cover 20-25 km and do so at a reasonable pace with breaks. If possible, don't push your daily distance much past that. Finishing by early afternoon gives you a few extra hours of recovery time. Clean up, grab lunch, visit the town/village, or journal after a solid and rewarding walk that day. I found it important to enjoy my non-walking time so as to put the entire Camino in perspective. Plus, as your Camino family evolves, you'll enjoy spending downtime with the friends you've made along the Way.
     
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  13. hindsfeet

    hindsfeet Donating Member Donating Member

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    Yes! Makes sense.......CAN'T WAIT!!
    Thank you...
     
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  14. David Fletcher

    David Fletcher Member

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    You will be assured time-and-again that this will be YOUR Camino, and my $0.02 suggestion is to go without expectations, save for having an experience. When I first got home, I declared it to be a once-in-a-lifetime experiences, but were the circumstances to present themselves, I might just do it again. I suppose I would probably train for hills just a bit more, but there is a difference between squeezing in an hour or two to walk while I'm at home, and having nothing else to do while you are on the Camino except walk, eat, drink and sleep. My journal was a blog (elperegrinodave.blogspot.com) if you want to hear/see more.

    And don't forget that a pilgrimage is about returning home (otherwise you're on a journey).

    Bon camino/Buen camino. David
     
  15. hindsfeet

    hindsfeet Donating Member Donating Member

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    Thanks David,
    Yes, I want to focus on hills as well. If I can get thru the first three days and feel GREAT, that
    would be a reflection I suppose on my training. I want no worries about physically enduring
    the Camino, just want to enjoy whatever it offers. I really like your last sentence that a pilgrimage is about returning home, (otherwise you're on a journey). Hmm.....not sure what
    I will be on at this point in time.................ha!
     
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  16. Crepes4Suzette

    Crepes4Suzette Well-Known Member

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    Just so you won't feel bad if it happens, many, no matter how well-prepared-physically they are, have a day here and there where they've "hit a wall" physically, and then they either take long "second breakfasts" and stop to rest and enjoy at every chance, take a rest day or maybe walk a shorter day. A few times I sent my pack ahead on really long or difficult days if was feeling really wiped out. Often if you're really wiped out at the end of a day of hiking, you feel fine the next morning. By Santiago I didn't feel right if I WASN'T walking, so continued to walk all day around town most of the days while there.
     
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  17. hindsfeet

    hindsfeet Donating Member Donating Member

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    C4S, ....ha....I WOULD feel bad if it happened. I understand, I have never walked so far before.
    Long "second and maybe third breakfasts" sound really good! I want to listen to my body
    for sure, because I have in the past, neglected those warning signs and ended up injured.
    Thank you for reeling me in!
     
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  18. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey C4S - Just finished a 27 km day from Vila do Conde to Barcelos. This was pushing my wife's limit and I think she was pretty close to "hitting the wall." On the positive side of things, we have two short days of 17 km each ahead of us. Most of today was on either asphalt or cobblestones. Adding a bit of afternoon rain to the picture made for some particularly slick stones when walking downhill. Even with breaks for refreshments, the plus 25 days can be long. One of the problems that I see when following the Brierley book is that some of his days are very long and a bit too much for some hikers. So, my recommendation is to definitely plan those rest days and keep your kilometers under 25 per day. You want to enjoy your time on the Camino.
     
  19. Crepes4Suzette

    Crepes4Suzette Well-Known Member

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    Wily, did you have any trouble with roadwalking on the way today (can't believe you guys got that far today!!)? You went through Rates, right? I've heard there is no shoulder on some of this, that there are some blind curves in that road, and that although the Portuguese are wonderful, they drive like maniacs. I hope your wife is refreshed by good food and good rest and that your day tomorrow gives you both a bit of a break, being shorter. Will look forward to hearing about it if you can post!
     
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  20. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey C4S - You are correct about your observations of road walking in Portugal (at least today's experience). There were many very narrow roads, with blind corners, and no shoulders. One had to be alert all the time! I believe that most of the Portuguese think they are Formula 1 drivers! The cobblestones augment the noise of approaching cars so they can't sneak up on you. All in all, harder than most walking days I had on the CF. The stones definitely tire out the feet after a while. But, all in all, the Portuguese countryside was charming particularly the numerous small towns and cafes that we stopped in. We caught the Caminho Central in Arcos and then proceeded on to Rates. One highlight was the eucalyptus forest we walked though shortly before arriving in Barcelos.
     
  21. UnkleHammy

    UnkleHammy Well-Known Member

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    On my trip this year I am including a 35 L nylon bag that I can stuff with almost everything and send it on by Jocotrans. Then I have a large, but light weight pack with my water in it to carry.
     
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  22. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey Hammy - Although I only used Jacotrans one time, I had an excellent experience with them. They seem to be quite well organized for getting packs from one albergue to another. I spoke with quite a few pilgrims using JakoTrans with some frequency and never heard of any problems. For 6-7 € a bag, it's money well spent. Glad to hear you're going that route!
     
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  23. UnkleHammy

    UnkleHammy Well-Known Member

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    I don't plan to do this JakoTrans thing
    very often, but with the 35 L bag, if I want to it it should be easy.
     
  24. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey Hammy - Although I changed to an Osprey, this is my second Camino with a 35L backpack. The big difference this time around is that I culled out a significant number of items I took with me last year so as to get down to a total pack weight of just ovef 6 kg. I reduced my load by about one third! What a difference a light pack makes! The best advice that I can offer you is to not overpack your large pack. It may be lightweight, hopefully not more than 3 pounds, but the tendency is to fill it up. Although I haven't seen too many other pilgrims yet this week, I can say that smaller packs are the rule, not the exception. Buen Camino!
     
  25. UnkleHammy

    UnkleHammy Well-Known Member

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    Last year it was a 48 L, this year it's a 38.
     
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  26. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Sounds perfect UnkleHammy!
     
  27. hindsfeet

    hindsfeet Donating Member Donating Member

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    Wily, wow...you really cut your weight down this time around. Do you have an extra pair
    of shoes with you also? I thought about starting the CF with hiking boots, but then wearing
    maybe trail running shoes for the rest of the walk. No? I hate the thought of the extra weight
    but thought in case one pair get wet.
     
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  28. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey Hindsfeet - I, too, had the same dilemma. In the end, I went with just my Merrell Moab GTXs. I gave a lot of thought to bringing my trail runnning shoes with me, but decided that weight was more important. Adding my Saucony's to my kit would have added about another kg.

    My Merrells are Gor-tex lined to help deal with wet conditions. I also have a pair of gaiters with me to help keep my feet dry. For post-hiking, I have my PR Soles sandals which feel great to put on after a long day on the trail. I've now been walking in light rain for the last three days. I'm very pleased to report "happy feet." Although I haven't yet experienced the downpours I walked through in Galicia last year, I can say that, so far, the Gor-tex is doing its job keeping my feet dry.
     
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  29. hindsfeet

    hindsfeet Donating Member Donating Member

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    Wily, I think that I am going to do the same. (Merrell Gor-tex), and gaiters. Thanks!
    Hopefully you and your wife enjoyed the shorter walking distance you planned for today.
    Look forward to your future posts...........safety, fun, frolic, exercise, camaraderie,
    oh yeah, and food!!
     
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