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How Much Did You Spend Per Day On The Camino?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Leslie, Jun 20, 2015.

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How Much did You Spend Per Day

  1. Less than €20

    4 vote(s)
    8.2%
  2. Less than €30

    15 vote(s)
    30.6%
  3. Less than €40

    17 vote(s)
    34.7%
  4. Less than 50

    9 vote(s)
    18.4%
  5. More than €50

    4 vote(s)
    8.2%
  1. Leslie

    Leslie Administrator

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    This question has been asked before, many times, but never as a poll, (I think).

    I have walked three times, the first and second I spent less than €30 per day. I was lazily unemployed, sorry strike that, I was a mature student, so poor and watching the cents.

    The last time I walked was on the Le Puy route and it was more like €50 per day.
     
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  2. stevelm1

    stevelm1 The Happy Peregrino Donating Member

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    I am planning for 50 Euro a day, but expect to come in under that most days.
     
  3. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    Personally, I believe that working out daily budgets with any degree of accuracy is all but impossible as there are simply too many imponderables.

    Probably the biggest of these is accommodation as on a route like the Camino Frances, it is possible to stay in a Refugio de Peregrino more or less every night, where as a route like St Adrian’s Tunnel, apart from a Refugio at the start (Irun) and one where it joins The Frances (Santo Domingo de la Calzada) there is only one Refugio available on the entire route (Or was when I walked it)

    Then the next biggest could well be food, some Peregrino’s eat out all the time, while others cook their own food in the Refugio’s

    Perhaps trying to ascertain different average budgets for different Camino’s would help, then maybe add in a lower and upper range to take into account individual’s expectations with eating and accommodation might help ??

    Best Regards

    Rob
     
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  4. stevelm1

    stevelm1 The Happy Peregrino Donating Member

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    I am planning high (around 50 Euro/day) as I expect to cook very little and stay in hotels many nights (but not all). I figure to plan high so I am prepared, but not feel obligated to spend that much if I can get by for less (in Albegues and occasionally cooking with friends etc.).
     
  5. Pete WaWa Antcliff

    Pete WaWa Antcliff New Member

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    I returned from the Camino Frances 4 weeks ago. Travelled well and didn't really worry too much about the budget. I stayed in Albergues most of the way, not usually in the Municipal unless it was necessary. Hotel in Burgos, Leon and Santiago and then 2 days in Barcelona on completion. Started from SJPDP on the 17th of April and arrived in Santiago on the 14th of May before walking on to Muxia and Finisterre. All up I only spent 1800 euro, this included meals and many Cervezza. Started out drinking the Grande sized beer but a Spanish friend very quickly put me onto quarto (not sure of the correct spelling). Basically a small beer. In most of Spain you will also get Tapas, Quarto y Tapas = 1.20 euro. four beers, four plates of tapas = very few times you need to buy dinner = not much money being spent. Go and enjoy and don't stress the money too much, this can be done very cheaply or as expensive as you want it to be. Buen Camino.
     
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  6. stevelm1

    stevelm1 The Happy Peregrino Donating Member

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    I am looking forward to discovering the Tapas as a meal and they sound both tasty and economical. I expect most of my money will be spent on hotels and fortunately I do not have to worry too much about the expenses as I have saved more than enough to cover this trip.
     
  7. fraluchi

    fraluchi 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015

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    Having a budget doesn't mean that you have to spend it.:rolleyes: Staying in albergues may cost between 6 and 12 Euros (depending upon type of albergue), but for a little more (10 Euros - particularly if you have somebody to share with) you can often find private rooms or hostals. The latter means that you have to ask around for a bit, and speaking some Castillano often comes in useful. For meals figure a simple breakfast for 4 to 6 Euros, a decent pilgrims' lunch for 10 to 12 Euros, dinner about the same unless you go for self catering. Throw in another 10 Euros a day for "unforeseen" (for me a cool beer is never "unforeseen":D) and you should have your average daily cost to budget for.
    This does not include Jacotrans (backpack "taxi") or bus travel. (Airport bus Santiago-Airport just over 7 Euros, a taxi from Santiago to the airport 21 Euros, etc.). Buen camino;)
     
  8. stevelm1

    stevelm1 The Happy Peregrino Donating Member

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    Thanks for that very practical advice mr. fraluchi.
     
  9. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    fraluchi – First of all, apologies if I didn’t make myself clear on my original post, this was really aimed at people without unlimited funds who are trying to work out a Minimum daily Budget.


    I agree with everything that you posted re prices you might expect to pay, but to try and illustrate better the point I was trying to put across, here are a couple of extremes taken from my own experiences walking The Camino Frances


    One day you might stay in a Refugio that offers a communal evening meal, a bed and then a breakfast, they then tell you to help yourself to the leftover bread and cheese / ham / jam for your lunch, and all this in return for a “Donativo” – So let’s say you put in 10 Euro, that would be your entire daily budget for that day.


    Another day, you arrive at the Refugio and find it full and the next Refugio is further away that you feel able to walk, all the other budget accommodation has been taken up only leaving you the choice of a “Posh” hotel, you are on your own and have to take a single room, this could cost you 50 Euro, you then add on your dinner, breakfast and lunch and using the prices you kindly posted, all of a sudden, your daily budget for that day is around 70 Euro.


    What I was trying to illustrate when I posted “I believe that working out daily budgets with any degree of accuracy is all but impossible as there are simply too many imponderables” it was that no one knows how many of each of the above extremes you will encounter on any Camino and therefore trying to come up with an overall minimum budget is far from easy.



    Another “imponderable” when replying to topics about budgets is that different Peregrino’s have different expectations / needs – The extremes of these might be that whereas some people choose to try to spend every night in a Refugio that has a kitchen, they then go to the local shop / supermarket and buy food, cook it in the Refugio kitchen and then don’t go out to socialise – Where as other Peregrino’s might choose either not to stay in a Refugio, or to stay in hotels from time to time and then go out every evening for a meal, a bottle of wine, then take both breakfast and lunch in local cafes or restaurants - Again, here the difference in the daily budget of these examples would be enormous.



    I hope that this clarifies what I was trying to demonstrate and apologies again for not making my initial reply clearer



    Best Regards

    Rob
     
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  10. raymond john

    raymond john Well-Known Member

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    As you say Rob its down to personal expectation and needs.
    When I walked the camino last year I stayed in Albergues and on average spent between 35-40 euros per day. We went out every evening to eat a Pilgrims menu on average 10 euros which included a botttle of wine for 2 .
    On 1 or 2 occasions I spent 25 euros. 5 euros for bed, breakfast & lunch and cooked a shared evening meal including wine.

    Buen Camino

    Raymond John
     
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  11. Maya Grandmother

    Maya Grandmother Active Member

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    This past April/May my husband and I spent an average of 80 Euros a day when we walked the camino frances. We wrote down all our daily spendings in the 6 weeks and averaged it out.
     
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  12. raymond john

    raymond john Well-Known Member

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    Maya
    Thanks for your post regarding daily expenditure . It reminded of wonderful Australian Husband & wife who walked with a group of us from Rabanal to Santiago. They were budgeting on a average daily expenditure of 60-65 euros a day. Stayed in Muni /Asoc type Albergues 5/6 euros except in Galicia Private Albergues 9/10 euros. Shopped in the local supermarket for breakfast and lunch. & Pilgrims menu 10 euros for the evening meal.

    Buen Camino

    Raymond John
     
  13. fraluchi

    fraluchi 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015

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    No need to apologize, Rob;) You are quite right by pointing out the various options of walking the Camino on a shoestring. However, I suggested to project an average budget, not necessarily to be spent. It's like mentioning that a taxi costs 1.20 Euros per kilometer, knowing that you can also take the bus for 1.30 Euros for a 10 km ride or thumb a lift:rolleyes:
    There is another aspect to be considered in this discussion. Depending upon the time of year, one finds "budget pilgrims" rushing out too early in the morning to line up as soon as possible at the next "donation albergue" with a kitchen and a supermarket around the corner. Over my various Caminos I noticed that if one takes it easy, even arriving without a reservation late afternoon in a village, there is always a bed available.
    Yes, there is a competition between those "who know" and the "greenhorns", and the bill is accordingly higher. :(Best to be prepared, and if you can save, so much the better.:cool:
     
  14. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    Overall, I Agree – The only thing I would wish to add is that



    Although some Peregrino’s wish to travel on a budget as a matter of choice, other Peregrino’s don’t have that luxury and their budget is born from necessity



    Best Regards

    Rob
     
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  15. fraluchi

    fraluchi 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015

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    I can see a point when indeed talking about a pilgrim who really has no luxury behind his pilgrimage..
    As past hospitalero I have had occasions that a bona fide pilgrim arrived without a cent, and was accommodated and fed free of charge. ;)
    I have also had the experiences at "donativo albergues" that some "pilgrims" abused of the hospitality. When counting the donativo box at the end of the day there have been reasons for disappointment.:eek:
    I don't believe that members of this Forum are of the "necessity" sort unless they start their pilgrimage on foot from their doorstep. Whether one likes it or not, a flight across the ocean is a luxury, so are handies and tablets.o_O
    Therefore a budget makes sense and, as mentioned before, it doesn't mean that you will spend it.;)
     
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  16. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    I haven’t had the privilege of volunteering to be a Hosptalario as yet, but it is certainly something I hope to do when I retire, probably in one of the two Refugio’s run by The Confraternity of Saint James – This was something my friend and I discussed last year on our last Camino when I walked from my home in Cumbria UK and my friend met me having walked from his home in Devon UK.



    I aren’t sure what you mean by a “bona fide pilgrim” ?? I Hope that I would fit that bill and I certainly have met Many that I would class as “bona fide” myself – A couple of examples immediately spring to mind that I think are worthy of a mention



    1) On the day I walked into Fromista I met a guy, I think his name was Juan Garcia, and probably the most interesting guy that I have ever had the privilege of meeting on any of the Camino’s that I have walked to date. He had been fishing in a small open boat in The Bay Of Biscay and there had been a storm that had sunk his boat, he had been a long way out to sea but had somehow managed to swim ashore and to Thank God for saving his life had decided to walk The Camino- However on arrival at Santiago de Compostela, he felt that he hadn’t done enough, so continued onto Rome and there had an audience with The Pope, However, he still did think that he had done enough and continued walking through Germany, Poland and over into Scandinavia, from there he walked back through the Baltic States, Poland, Germany, France and I met him on his way to Santiago de Compostela for the second time. All he was carrying was a small daypack with was stuffed full of newspaper clippings about his journey, the Refugio’s gave him free accommodation and fellow pilgrims (And I believe the church) bought him his food and drink – Buying him the latter was an absolute privilege as he was such a Genuine Guy – I was going to start a thread to see if anyone else had come across this amazing chap ???

    2) In the early stages on my own Camino Frances I met a beautiful tall French lady with long flowing blond hair who had started her Camino from her home in Central Massif, France, she walked barefoot and wore what I can only describe as a long flowing shroud and carried a huge wooden staff, alas, I can’t recall her name but she as she walked, her boyfriend travelled to the towns and cities en-route and Busked to try to generate the funds for her to continue her Pilgrimage – I never saw her again after Puente La Reina, so I hope she was successful !!







    With how much to put in the box at Refugio’s who as for a Donativo – When I asked this question I was told to put in what I could afford by one person and put in what I thought by another – I came up with around 10 Euro if there wasn’t a communal dinner and around 20 Euro if there was, where as people on tight budgets certainly put in a lot less, and hopefully people with unrestricted budgets put in more – As an experienced Hosptalario, do you think this is about right ??



    I have no stats on how many people take flights to start / get home but as around 50% of Peregrino’s are Spanish, 15% Portuguese and 8% French, an educated guess would be less than ½ - But I do agree that s this is an English language forum, that most who use this will be using air travel to get to the start of their Camino and also back home again.



    However – Before this thread goes completely away from the original question, from the info already posted, we have figures of daily budgets from 30 Euro per day to 80 Euro per day – So taking and average of 35 days to walk The Camino Frances that represents a budget of between 1050 Euro to 2800 Euro which I feel demonstrates my original point that working out budgets with any degree of accuracy is all but impossible as there are simply too many imponderables. And – Even if there aren’t many people who use this forum who are walking their Camino on a tight budget, that these Peregrino’s shouldn’t be discounted, as, something that we usually all agree on is that “We all walk our own Camino”



    Good Luck and Buen Camino to one and all

    Rob
     
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  17. Magwood

    Magwood Super Moderator

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    As some of you will know, I have posted to my blog every day on each of my three caminos. This year I walked the camino Mozárabe from Málaga and thought that as it is a very little walked route it would be useful to include a note of my daily expenditure and what it purchased, in order to give as much information as possible. I have to say that I didn't enjoy this aspect of my blogging, but kept it up for a while because quite a few followers said they found it useful.

    The Mozárabe wasn't really a typical example because I had to stay in private hostals now and then when there wasn't an albergue provided, which bumped up the average spend. I didn't like to keep reminding myself how much the camino was costing me, and as a result tried hard to keep my expenditure down to a minimum, which was a bit tiresome. I kept the exercise up for 23 days and my average spend per day over that period was 24 euros.

    I am fairly sure that once I stopped keeping tags on my spending my money disappeared somewhat faster, although I was still a fairly frugal pilgrim, but one that enjoyed a few more treats!

    You how much I spent, and on what, here http://www.magwood.me/camino-mozarabe/
     
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  18. Magwood

    Magwood Super Moderator

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  19. Sammy

    Sammy New Member

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    I am walking from Sarria to Santiago and have given myself 7 days - which I'm sure will be enough time! Although - I am a student and money is... Almost non exsistant, so if anybody can advise me on how to enjoy myself on the cheapest budget that would be amazing!
     
  20. Leslie

    Leslie Administrator

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    I find some of the previous comments really interesting, esp on the donation albergues.

    The first time I walked I had almost nothing, and survived on a very tight budget. Buying tuna and bread for lunch and often not having breakfast was my way of saving.

    I am sure in a couple of donation albergues that included an evening meal I only donated 5 euro. The next year I had a bit more money and gave more. I understand that things have to be paid for, but now I give more in some places with the thought that it is helping to even the scales.

    Re walking from @Sammy on a budget. I think this is the hardest stretch to keep to a low budget on due to the competition to get in one of the xunta albergues each night, these are only 6 euro, where private ones will be more. I also found I spent more on food in the final stages, maybe because I had scrimped until then.
     
  21. Sammy

    Sammy New Member

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    Thanks for the reply - ok I will do some research into the different xunta albergues.
     
  22. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    Hi again Sammy

    Good info posted by Leslie

    I might add, that getting a bed in the Xunta Refugio’s is the problem as queues frequently form outside them around mid day and they are often full by early afternoon – Lots of Peregrino’s get into a routine of getting up pre-dawn and rushing to the next Refugio to claim their bed, not something I would get involved in myself, so if you are of a similar mind and you start to find the Refugio’s full when you want to stop for the day, then another option is to book a Private Refugio ahead, these are more expensive than the Xunta Refugio’s but still considerably cheaper than staying in a hotel – What tends to happen is that the Xunta Refugio’s fill up first, then the Private Albergue’s, then the cheaper hotels and finally the more expensive hotels.



    7 days is Lots of time and depending how fast you do it, you might have time to continue onto either Finisterra or Muxia – Not so many Peregrino’s do this and the Refugio’s are much quieter



    Another good way of saving money is by buying bread and cheese/ham/ salami or whatever in the shops and making your own breakfast and/or lunch – Aim to be in a village or town with a shop before 13.00 as a lot close then for the siesta – Lots of restaurants offer the Plata del Dias in the evening for Peregrino’s and this is a very cheap way of having a substantial meal served with wine for around 10 Euro



    Good Luck and Buen Camino

    Rob
     
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  23. Sammy

    Sammy New Member

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    Thank you, that's brilliant. You are right, I personally would rather enjoy the day instead of rushing. Does this mean that I would always have to book ahead? Or is it still acceptable to just turn up? And the food idea is good advice - thank you again!
     
  24. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    Hi again Sammy

    I suspect that the only way that you are going to be able to guarantee yourself a bed without rushing or getting up at Silly-O’Clock is to book one ahead – But this can be done on a day to day basis so you retain most of your flexibility, Last year I kept coming across leaflets advertising inexpensive beds for Peregrino’s on the route (Inside Bars, stuck to trees or posted in shop windows etc) and you can just ring ahead in the morning to secure a bed that night.

    You might want to print of this list of Albergue’s which, although by no means definitive, it does give you both prices and contact details of much of what is available on the route http://caminoteca.com/attachments/article/123/Albergues_Camino_Francés_2015.pdf



    Good Luck and Buen Camino

    Rob
     
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  25. Kenny Philpott

    Kenny Philpott New Member

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    How do you book ahead? I assume you call but is it a problem if you don't speak Spanish? Can you send an email to book a bed?
     
  26. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    Hi Kenny

    Booking ahead by phone is the normal method

    My Spanish is also abysmal, but I learnt a few simple phrases like booking a room and getting an appropriate size of bed (Depending on whether I was travelling with a girlfriend or male friend) and somehow always managed to get by ;-)



    However, English is now widely spoken. Particularly on The Camino Frances where it is often used as the common language when several nationalities are having a conversation, so I am sure you will be fine.



    Good Luck and Buen Camino

    Rob
     
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  27. Michael Holding

    Michael Holding New Member

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    It came out very close to 20 Euros right up to the end when I realised I had some cash to spare and splashed-out a bit.
     
  28. From somewhere

    From somewhere New Member

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    I agree with Michael Holding, 20 Euros per day should be enaugh. You can cook in many places, no need to eat pilgrim menu for 10-12 EURO, when you can buy 10 eggs for 1.50-2 euro, and share it even with others.

    In spring-time it was cheaper to stay in Spain, than in the summer, I guess Autumn will be cheaper again.
     
  29. Michael Holding

    Michael Holding New Member

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    Hi,

    I'd say that 'widely spoken' is probably an overstatement. It's probably true that most albergues have someone around who can speak English at some level, but in many rural areas there aren't many English speakers and even a few basic words in Spanish come in very handy.
     
  30. Gerry Vandermaat

    Gerry Vandermaat Donating Member Donating Member

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    My wife and I walked the Camino Frances in April/May in 2015. We chose not to stay in Albergues. So, the cost was around 50 - 60 euros per day for both of us. (we did enjoy a beer and wine at the end of each day). We acknowledge it could be done much cheaper, but we were prepared to pay for comfort and privacy at the end of a long day. To each his own - Buen Camino, Amigos.:)
     
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