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Humidity In August And September

Discussion in 'The Weather' started by alisa, May 9, 2017.

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  1. alisa

    alisa New Member

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    Hello! I will be starting in SJPP in late August and walking through September. From what I've read I expect it to be warm or hot in late August and possibly September, but I'm wondering how humid it is? I'm from Seattle and while it can get humid in the summer, it's nothing compared to Texas, for example. Just wondering if I should be expecting an extreme as I'm walking, one way or the other, so that I can prepare. :)

    Thanks!
     
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  2. Crepes4Suzette

    Crepes4Suzette Well-Known Member

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    Alisa, I've walked Sept/October before and can't address the August heat, but September is a great month to hike it heat-and-humidity-wise. The Meseta is supposed to be roasting in July/August, but people then just carry extra water and stop more often to recharge. Galicia, at the end, always gets some extra rain and is very green. Others will be able to say better about August.
     
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  3. alisa

    alisa New Member

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    Thanks!
     
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  4. BROWNCOUNTYBOB

    BROWNCOUNTYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Alisa, my wife and I walked our first camino frances in 2015. We began in late Sept and it took us 35 days to reach Santiago. I was surprised about the low humidity. Most days we walked 14 or 15 miles and didn't sweat a bit. We're walking camino frances again this fall, beginning our camino on Sept 8th. My brother and his wife will walk the entire camino with us. Last summer I decided to track the weather in 2016 for the same locations we'll pass through this fall. This included the temps, humidity and type of weather last Sept/Oct. You can see that most days the humidity is below 50%. Hopefully this will give you an idea what you might expect during your camino. Bob

    upload_2017-5-9_9-39-22.png
     
  5. alisa

    alisa New Member

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    Thank you, Bob! This is really helpful!
     
  6. keithlundy1

    keithlundy1 Member

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    Hello Alisa, I walked the Camino at exactly the same time 2yrs ago and whilst I can honestly say over the 31 days 2/3rds of the journey was dry with warmish weather, however the majority of the evenings were cool to cold and I experienced 6 days of the most torrential rain many have said they have never seen before. I did have a waterproof jacket but I wish I had also taken a full waterproof smock as I got absolutely soaked to the skin every day which isn't much fun.
    I'm walking again starting 25th July which is right in the middle of the hot season and I'm still going to take a full waterproof smock to wear over everything. I've also invested in a pair of new waterproof trekking shoes, it's just not worth taking the risk of not having the waterproof gear.
    At that time of year in Northern Spain there is quite a difference to the costa or mid/south Spain and as you are walking parallel to the Northern route the mountains which you can see in the far distance attract the low pressure which does the affect the Frances route so prepare for the worst and smile every day it doesn't rain. Buen Camino Keith, Norfolk
     
  7. alisa

    alisa New Member

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    Thanks Keith, luckily I have no problems with rain, it will be interesting to see how intense it gets. I will be prepared for wet! :)
     
  8. Donna

    Donna Member

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    My sister and I start August 25th from SJPP. I had the same question, thanks !
     
  9. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey Donna - I always travel prepared for rain, but hope not to encounter too much. My rain gear is pretty simple. I carry a lightweight Northface raincoat with hood, a ball cap, and gaiters to cover the top of my shoes. I've carried a poncho on my two Caminos, but have only taken it out once. Next trip, it stays home! The rain jacket is also great on chilly mornings or evenings particularly in the mountains. The other two things I'll mention is that my hiking shoes are waterproof and be sure to have a backpack cover. My pack cover kept everything dry without hassling with a poncho particularly in the wind. But, you'll see a lot of ponchos along The Way, so it's a bit of an individual preference as to what you take. Buen Camino.
     
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  10. Donna

    Donna Member

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    I read somewhere that with the backpack cover your straps still got wet, but that the poncho covered everything.
     
  11. Donna

    Donna Member

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    I do have a similar type jacket. I'm 51 and am always hot so I was second guessing bringing it. I am bringing a light weight long sleeve shirt.
     
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  12. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey Donna - Yes, you're correct. Your straps won't be covered. If you do take a poncho, check out those offered by Frog Toggs. They're lightweight and breathable. Mine only weighs 6.5 ounces. On my Osprey pack, I have a lower sleeping bag compartment where it's also very easy to stow rain gear for quick and easy access. Buen Camino!
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017
  13. Followtheyellowarrows

    Followtheyellowarrows New Member

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    I walked a few years ago starting at the end of August through to the end of September. I didn't find it humid at all - my hair air dried frizz-free :). It does get more humid in Galacia.

    We didn't have much rain but I will echo Wily's suggestion of a light weight waterproof jacket instead of a poncho. The jacket is more versatile and I often wore it on chilly mornings even with no rain. Ponchos don't work well if it is windy. My pack cover worked perfectly for keeping the contents dry and I didn't mind having wet straps since my rain jacket kept me dry. I did have water proof hiking shoes but the one day that I walked in a down pour they did not prove to be very effective - gaiters would likely have helped. I didn't bother with rain pants and since I really only had one full day of rain I was happy to leave them home. That said I know there are many poncho advocates as well!
     
  14. BROWNCOUNTYBOB

    BROWNCOUNTYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Donna, during our camino two years ago, my wife and I both had rain backpack covers for our Osprey packs and they did a pretty good job keeping things inside our pack dry. However, as added protection, we used a dry / stuff sack for our lightweight sleeping bags, and large zipclose bags for our clothes. This kept everything nice and dry even if we walked all day in the rain. We had goretex rain jackets which did a nice job. The only thing that got drenched were our shorts, socks and shoes. For our next camino (we leave in 3 weeks), we have gaiters to wear over our socks and shoes, so our feet should be mostly dry on rainy days.
     
  15. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey Donna - Personally, I like layers. Easy on; easy off! I carry a lightweight, long-sleeved shirt. It's more like an underlayer made of mositure wicking material. If it was just a little chilly, it did the job. However, not so helpful in the rain. Then, I found the lightweight jacket more than enough to deal with light to even heavy rain.

    Regarding gaiters, check out what Outdoor Research offers. I got a lightweight low pair for both my wife and me. The specific model was the Rocky Mountain Low Gaiter. Although it's a men's gaiter, the smaller of the two sizes fit my wife's shoes perfectly. For about $30 it proved to be a good investment. Buen Camino!
     
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  16. Greg Canning

    Greg Canning Well-Known Member

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    Hi Donna

    Here's my tuppence worth, for what it's worth :) I've walked twice now in September/October and once in march April. I've brought and used my poncho on three occasions and to be honest was glad I had it. In Navarre we had one day of pretty constant misty rain that seemed to just hang in the air and tried to seep into everything (a "soft day" as they say here). I was glad to have the poncho to cover both myself and my pack.

    Outside Burgos earlier this year we had really heavy rain for the morning and once again the poncho came in useful even though we had rain covers for the packs.

    I suppose what it really comes done to is weight. If you can get a very lightweight but reasonably reliable poncho then it's worth bringing. You may walk your entire Camino and not see rain (unlikely but possible).

    This year we are doing a week in late September from Fromista to Leon. I will bring the poncho again but this time only if my overall weight allows it. I don't expect much rain and I also have my pack cover.

    So there you go...clear as mud!

    Buen Camino

    Greg
     
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  17. Daniel Bowater

    Daniel Bowater Member

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    Agree with some of the comments on ponchos. They are very popular on the Camino but I would prefer a good rain jacket any day. A poncho is not very versitile, cant be used in casual situations, doesnt retain heat well. A good bag cover/raincoat combo is what I found ideal. In windy cobditions ponchos tend to blow everywhere letting the rain in horizontally. But at other times I'll admit they do perform their role very well, and pack down well. Each to their own!

    Everyone's judgment on weather goes back to where they're from imo. During June European people were complaining on the trail about extreme heat. To me it felt like nice weather, basically equivalent to a dry winter in North Queensland, Australia.
     
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  18. fraluchi

    fraluchi 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015

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    I suggest that you check average high and low temperatures, as well as other climate info, on www.weatherspark.com for the main cities which you will walk through: Pamplona, Logrono, Burgos, Leon, and of course Santiago. For short forecasts, use aemet.es as a website. Buen camino.;)
     
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  19. ToussantFrend

    ToussantFrend New Member

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    Wow! I will take note of this for future reference. :)
     
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