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if doing both Muxia and Finisterre...which order to do them

Discussion in 'Camino Frances' started by Lotti, Aug 10, 2012.

  1. Lotti

    Lotti New Member

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    Any suggestions on which order to do these in. Maybe based on which one is easiest to get out of etc...
    I have the time to do both and plan on doing both but not certain which one is best to end on.
    Would love any words of wisdom here...
    Thanks in advance,
    Lotti
     
  2. cw18

    cw18 New Member

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    The John Brierley guide book I have does Finisterre first. I'm sure I read somewhere in the last couple of weeks that it's hard/impossible to get into the hostel at Muxia unless you've had your passport stamped at Finisterre - but I stand to be corrected on that one.
     
  3. Hobbler

    Hobbler Active Member

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    As far as I know from reading the literature on the caminos it is essential to have your credential already stamped for the Santiago camino if you want to get it stamped for the Finisterre one. That would mean that you have to do the Santiago camino first.

    About the accommodation on the Finisterre camino Gerald Kelly has an excellent guide to accommodation on the Camino Francés and it continues from Santiago to Finisterre and Muxia. The guide is very up-to-date and contains great information on places to eat as well. It's available at www.CaminoGuide.net - Camino de Santiago - free guide to download - Camino Francés - St James Way
     
  4. HuskyNerd

    HuskyNerd Super Moderator

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    As cw18 says, Brierley's suggestion is Santiago to Finisterre, then Finisterre to Muxia. The reason is that walking from the option point to Finisterre is more scenic than the option point to Muxia. I know pilgrims who've done it both ways, and most agree with Brierley.
     
  5. BlackDog

    BlackDog Member

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    You need a stamp from Finisterre and one from Lires if that is the chosen route. Lires makes sure you didn't just take the bus :eek:
     
  6. BlackDog

    BlackDog Member

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    I don't believe that is a correct. Please indicate where that is stated?
     
  7. Hobbler

    Hobbler Active Member

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    Page vi of 'Pilgrim Guides to Spain: 3 Finisterre' by Alison Raju published by The Confraternity of St. James.
    I quote:
    Fisterrany This is a certificate of pilgrimage given by the Concello (town hall) in Finisterre to those who have completed the route and have their credenciales (pilgrim passports, from the route they walked prior to Santiago) stamped at intervals along the way. You can make enquiries about this in the refugio in Finisterre.

    A similar certificate (Muxiana​) is also available for those who have walked on to Muxia, whether from Finisterre or directly from Hospital, and is issued either by the tourist office or the refugio in Muxia. (end quote)

    Above that, on the same page under the heading Accommodation, is the following:

    Please note that if you want to stay in the refugios you will need your credencial
    (pilgrim passport), normally the one you used to walk/cycle to Santiago. Note, too,
    that the refugios in Finisterre and Muxia are only available to those who walk or cycle
    all the way from Santiago - NOT to those who arrive by bus.

    This guide gives excellent information both about the rout and about the accommodation along the way. The Confraternity website is at
    Home page - The Confraternity of St James
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2012
  8. BlackDog

    BlackDog Member

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    Then it appears to be an inaccurate statement by Alison Raju, as the albergue in Negreira issues a credencial specifically for the purpose for pilgrims to obtain a Fisterrana having walked from Santaigo on the Camino Fisterra and received sellos after Santiago to prove their journey on foot. Clearly if one has unstamped spaces in your credencial from your previous camino then that credencial can be used for the necessary sellos. Alison also states that one may make enquiries about the Fisterrana at the albergue - in fact it is issued there.
     
  9. Hobbler

    Hobbler Active Member

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    David, I have not yet walked any camino. I have to rely in my preparation on what I can glean from those who care for the camino and those who have travelled it and have actual experience. William Bisset, in the foreward to the 2012 edition of the Camino Francés Guide published by The Confraternity of St. James says that he is grateful to all those who have provided feedback from their experience. I'm quite sure he would welcome your feedback concerning the Finisterre trail. Alison Raju's guide to the Finisterre trail was most recently published in 2009 and would benefit from your input.

    Thanks for posting.
     
  10. BlackDog

    BlackDog Member

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    Garrett, neither have I :) but I'm off next month :cool:. The problem with a 2009 guide is that it is seriously out of date for certain elements and needs a complete revision. Guides such as Brierley and Kelly manage to reflect the changes that take place along the caminos by republishing at regular intervals and even then they can be inaccurate and contain errors.

    If the CSJ, of which I am a member, hasn't got anything in the pipeline and if I manage to get to Finisterre in October then I may consider doing one (two IFs there though!). I have already produced a pdf file containing a list of "all" albergues along the Camino Frances and on to Finisterre and Muxia Albergues on the Camino Frances | Camino de Santiago that some people find useful and it's as up-to-date as I and others can make it.

    Guides are interesting. I don't like the pure textual approach of the CSJ guides and much prefer a more graphic representation. I have the Brierley, Kelly, Michelin and CSJ guides, all purchased (some more than once) and I use the internet guides from various other Spanish organisations and other pilgrim blogs. What I don't do is take any of them as 'the truth' and that is why I was able to pick up the point on credencials for the Camino Fisterra as I have done a lot of research and cross checking of the points that I am interested in or at least think I ought to be interested in.

    Guides can give us: routes, elevations, maps, stages (not always the same depending on guide authors), towns & villages and their attributes, accommodation details, web addresses and sites, detours, historical information, cultural and history overviews, practical information, weather overviews, packing lists, travel planning etc. etc. Some of it useful beforehand, some of it useful on the journey, and some of it is useful after completion of your journey. I applaud those who try to package all that information into a single guide. Some don't try to, such as the Michelin, others split them into two guides or at least two or more sections so that they can be carried with us. It is an onerous task to produce something that satisfies all our requirements in a compressed and succinct way.

    Personally, I prefer Brierley as a carried publication and put the rest into electronic format for my personal use and reference as I go along. Brierley doesn't like his in electronic format! I take none of them as definitive and use them all as guides to my camino when relevant.
     
  11. Hobbler

    Hobbler Active Member

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    David, thank you for such a detailed reply. I have the 9th ed. Brierley, the Michelin and Kelly's. The Michelin I shall leave at home so that my beloved can follow my progress, such as it may turn out to be. I hope, like you, to complete the course from St Jean through to Finisterre and Muxia but am very conscious of my limitations.

    I can't help feeling that the camino has become something of an industry. When I read Sil's most interesting account of the history of the camino and its explosion in numbers doing it in recent years, I do wonder what has happened to make us all regard this particular pilgrim path as so much better that the dozens of others, some as old or older that the Camino de Santiago. It's a funny old world.

    I start my camino in September and will still (hopefully) be plugging away at the end of October so our paths may cross.

    Buen camino.
     
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