1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Insulin and Syringes

Discussion in 'Medical Problems' started by JoanneB, Dec 23, 2014.

  1. JoanneB

    JoanneB Guest

    Hi all, Joanne from the US and I just registered. I have been thinking about doing this walk for some time now. Don't know if I will be ready by April 2015 or if I will have to wait another year. My question is about medications - will I have trouble traveling with medications? Particularly concerned about insulin and syringes. Also wondering how I will manage to keep the insulin cool if the weather warms up.
    Second question - do I really need to train to do this walk? I will not have a time limit and really hope to take my time and unwind.
    Thanks in advance for your help.
     
  2. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    Messages:
    1,103
    Likes Received:
    1,394
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Cumbria UK
    Home Page:
    I am assuming when you say “This Walk” that you are referring to The Camino Frances ??

    Anyway, other than mentioning that The Camino Frances is just one out of several Camino options and although it’s the most popular, it is also the busiest and depending what time of year you are considering your walk, it can be Manic, so you might like to research some of the other options

    To your questions – I can only answer the second question and that is that I would advise at least a certain amount of “Training” so that you are fit enough to enjoy your walk – This “Training” doesn’t have to be excessive, even a few days walks will help (Although a couple of weekend back to back walks would be better), especially of you carry the same rucksack that you intend to take on Camino, Just so you get used to walking carrying a pack so as to give you some idea of what your are about to attempt ;-)

    Good Luck and Buen Camino
    Rob
     
  3. Dave2525

    Dave2525 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2013
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    You want to do a certain amount of training even if it's just to break in your shoes. Your stamina and endurance will build up as you walk the Camino.
     
  4. highlander

    highlander Donating Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2012
    Messages:
    537
    Likes Received:
    130
    Trophy Points:
    43

    Joanne B

    Use a Frio pack. There is a load of border dash Frio Pack.jpg mentioned generally from very well meaning non-diabetics....if you go on line www.Frio...problem solved forever....I became a diabetic a few years ago when I damaged my pancreas boring story.....The Frio pack works well even in hot conditions ......The camino is the best form of exercise for a diabetic...and you need to look after you first above anybody else..being a diabetic is very individual thing,even your know this.so putting your self on test as it where along with your Frio pack there will be a modest incident rate.....hypos come out of blue sometimes..........you are responsible to make sure you regulate your medication and have food around your person all the time....without pressure being put onto another person walking the camnio..make sure if a incident occurs for example....your having the start of a hypo (I know sometime it happens lightening fast)you know how to say in Spanish Diabetic if you enter a shop/store/ restaurants /for assistance---------DIABETICO----it is good idea to learn to pronounce this word correctly.....I was in Estelle walking around at leisure and without any warning I felt terrible, trembling sweats worse than ever before, I was looking for some place to eat, and I done everything perfectly that day (except I did not bother to carry any food on me after my shower and walking around town) I went into a restaurants and just stood there not wanting to admit I needed to ask for help.I discovered there was no food until the evening,so struggling to keep stood up I said to the lady "DIABETICO"and she sat me down, gave me some sugar and produced a heated up dish of rice and clams etc in about 1 minute,I was the only person there,all the while with a smile rubbing my shoulder......you really need to know how to pronounce DIABETICO correctly......when a diabetic becomes confused during a hypo the worst person to help themselves then is a diabetic.........and I know sometimes a diabetic can be very belligerent just shy of a hypo.....food around you ALL the time even in bed..FRIO pack and if only one word ...... DIABETCIO...
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2014
  5. stevelm1

    stevelm1 The Happy Peregrino Donating Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2014
    Messages:
    265
    Likes Received:
    174
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Arlington, WA, USA
    Home Page:
    Joanne, I have not walked the Camino yet, but plan to in Sep next year, and I am a diabetic as well. I use a pump so I do not need syringes, but I do need my pump supplies. I am planning on taking a months worth of insulin (insulin can go a month without refrigeration) with me and a prescription from my doc to get more over there. Not sure what insulin will cost in Spain but you can be sure it is less than here in the States. I am planning on taking all my pump supplies as I doubt I can get them over there, but insulin and syringes should be available in every pharmacy along the way. Talk to your doc about having the prescriptions and I am betting you will not have a problem. Buen Camino.
     
  6. highlander

    highlander Donating Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2012
    Messages:
    537
    Likes Received:
    130
    Trophy Points:
    43
    FOR UK citizens Diabetic meds are free. and when we travel to SPAIN we just give the doctor or medical center our blue card and medex card (exemption card). works both ways....comes out of the taxes we pay via National insurance...for you being a non-European, you will pay to see a doctor, there are ways to work you way around paying, I would Pm you how but I am unable to do so for a period with newbies and unable to find out when you can.......your be surprised how Spain is ahead of treatments for diabetics, way ahead than the UK..you can keep insulin cool far longer than a month using frio packs, many diabetics use other ways for longer periods on the camnio with out a fridge...just discovered how on the other camnio de santiago forum (ivar)... generally if your a pilgrim and need medical attention, minor not major I have heard of positive reports from American citizens not being charge the full amount, the camino Francas is becoming a American filled camino now anyway...so all your needs will be met in full soon...
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2014
  7. ediths

    ediths New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2014
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Hi Joanne, I'm not a diabetic so take my words as they seem to fit. I am in fairly decent condition but still consider it necessary to train as much as I can. During my training I have tested my rain gear ( by walking 10 k in the rain) and found it lacking so had to address that ( in the end I had to get new gear). My boots didn't work out. I had to replace those. I found that out by doing lots of walking in them. Bit by bit I am figuring this out but there is a lot of trial and error. I would hate to have to find all of these things out first as I am walking the Camino. Even if you have a long time to do this trip ( I am allowing 6 weeks) , are you aware of the distance between villages? Getting caught in mud and rain and first finding out that your gear is not water proof or your backpack really doesn't fit your body at all ( there are packs designed for women) is far from desirable when you are between villages with no other options. When you are living with health issues it might be prudent to support the body as best as can be done. My thinking is that doing as much training as you can before hand can only help you. It might eliminate some nasty surprises on the trip. Buen Camino !
     
  8. EileenSP

    EileenSP New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2015
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Hi Joanne, I have Type 1 diabetes and have traveled extensively. I don't think you'll have any problem traveling with your meds. I usually just keep a copy of my prescriptions with me but I have never needed them. I use the pump, but always bring insulin pens for back up.

    I plan on doing my first camino this July and I'm nervous about all of the diabetes supplies I have to carry with me along with everything else. On the bright side my body will get stronger from the heavier backpack! I'm only at the very beginning stages of planning the trip so I'll probably be back on here posting few more times.

    I highly recommend the Frio pack as well. You will be able to keep your insulin at a constant temperature to be sure it won't go bad in the heat.

    -Eileen
     
Loading...
Similar Threads - Insulin Syringes
  1. Colleen Fuller
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    1,123
  2. PabloElFlamenco
    Replies:
    20
    Views:
    10,527

Share This Page