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One Pilgrim's Sure Fire Cure All Bullet Proof Camino Packing List

Discussion in 'What equipment should you use and take' started by HuskyNerd, Apr 13, 2011.

  1. Joe Lillis

    Joe Lillis New Member

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    Thanks everyone, I ended up finding a North Face breathable rainjacket reduced from 100 to 50 pounds... just because it wasn't this seasons style (fashion is a strange phenomenon...)!

    Gerry, I hope so! It's fantastic to already experience some of the friendliness of the Camino before I've even begun.

    Thanks again guys, I'll be sure to post here again post-camino and let you know how the gear worked :)

    Buen Camino all x
     
  2. razzaefc

    razzaefc New Member

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    what size bags do people take? im looking at 40litre one.
    also those one liner socks, does anyone have a link for where i can buy them in the UK also, i have just bought a new pair of shoes, there comfortable with one pair of socks or wearing two, with the liner socks, is the idea to wear another pair on top of those,if so what type.thanks.
     
  3. BoxOfFrogs

    BoxOfFrogs Member

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    Raz,

    As sandy has already pointed out, one of the options for a liner sock is the 1000 mile sock. You can get these easily in the uk from places like go outdoors etc. I have been wearing and training with the classic sock liner from 1000 mile. It's a "guaranteed" no blister double layered liner sock, the idea being that the duel layer of sock rubs together and avoids sock and skin rubbing. I wear them with a 1 season smartwool sock on top, effectively giving me 3 layers. So far I have not had any blisters this way, however it can be a warm combination. I have gotten over this by taking my boots off a regular intervals and giving them an airing.

    I think the only way you will really know is to give it a go pre camino, give a combination a good test and if it works go buy some more and stick with it! I'm trying to adopt that same philosophy, but am finding old habits hard to break. Reminds me of the saying "a little bit of knowledge is the most dangerous amount"

    Good luck and Buen camino!
     
  4. lhlyda

    lhlyda New Member

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    Raz,

    My old backpack was 60 L. which is very comfortable, but with the "little" load I'm taking sags.

    I bought a Osprey Talon 33 and it seems to be the right size for my "stuff"

    I bought it for the weight and limited volume. The bigger, the more tempted I was to carry.

    My thoughts.
     
  5. Waterweed

    Waterweed Member

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    I second that; if one has space to put something else in, one will find something to put in that space. It's like conversation; for Americans, we do not like and are uncomfortable when there is silence and will say anything to break the silence. I have worked on accepting the silence; it is still challenging, but one can learn so much in silence.
    Hugs to all; 12 days and counting. Now, I did not say I was ready, but I am counting.
     
  6. razzaefc

    razzaefc New Member

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    right i am thinking of buying an ofsprey 60 liter, i know its big but i want more that one use out of it as i travel allot, its very comfortable and has all the features i need, i still wont be taking anything that isnt necessary!

    also bought a pair of 1000 mile single layer liner sock and a pair of 74% marino wool karrimor sock, is that a good percentage?

    damn time is flying,will have to book my flighs soon as im looking to leave the 8th of october

    thanks for all the help on here
     
  7. HuskyNerd

    HuskyNerd Super Moderator

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    I agree that it's nice to buy a full-size backpack (50L+) to get more use out of it. Besides succumbing to the temptation to overpack, which you're resisting as you should, the contents of a large pack can nest in the bottom of the pack. That makes an awkward weight distribution. In my opinion it's nice to have a fair part of the weight between your shoulder blades, rather than riding at the small of your back, which tends to pull you backwards a little more. My pack's the same size as the one you're looking at and I love it. However, I do admire the Osrey 27L pack a friend recently bought and one day I hope to give a try to an ultralight approach using a pack that size. Buen camino!
     
  8. razzaefc

    razzaefc New Member

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    given the choice then i would buy the perfect smaller sized backpack, but this one is really comfortable, and like iv said, i travel allot and need the bigger pack, im a plaster by trade so im used to carrying/using my upper body, i know this is completely different to walking but i manged to take my 80liter, full with clothes, shoes, you name it all around the world for 12 months, so im hoping that puts me in good stead to carry this 60l which will be lightly packed!
     
  9. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo New Member

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    Hi guys,

    Very useful advices.

    I´m just wondering about rain protection. The rain cover will do the trick for the backpack. A breathable rainjacket is enough for the upper part of the body. I agree that a poncho is unnecessary extra weight.

    What about the legs. I like to wear shorts when I´m trekking. I´m not a huge fan of pants. Did anyone face a heavy rain in this situation? Did you put on any extra protection for the legs, or just let them get wet?
    Other problem is if the water runs through your legs towards your boots, and your feet. Walking with wet boots is a huge problem. How do you deal with this problem?
     
  10. sean

    sean Active Member

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    Hi Ronaldo,

    I would suggest that you bring a set of wet gear top and bottom. The bottoms will keep the water from running into your boots and there is no better way to get blisters than letting your feet get wet. There are many manufacturers, all claiming how good their product is at keeping water out. Fact is that most of these, including Gore Tex will make you sweat and can be worse than rain wetting. A good wet jacket should come down well over your hips, as this stops water going inside your wet gear trousers.

    Enjoy your Camino

    Regards,
    Sean
    Dublin
     
  11. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo New Member

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    In the lists suggested in this topic, I couldn´t find any waterproof trousers. That´s why I´m asking.
    What about gaiters?

    In Spring, late April or early May, do you think it´s necessary to bring a sleeping bag? I was thinking of just the liner.
     
  12. HuskyNerd

    HuskyNerd Super Moderator

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    I don't personally recommend waterproof trousers myself, Ronaldo. To me they're a one-purpose item that has marginal benefit, especially since most waterproof gear is hot and sweaty inside. My choice is a pair of quick-dry trousers which function in the same way, but can also be your long trousers for dinner in restaurants and for cool days. Like waterproof trousers they also keep rain out of your boots. The North Face pants are very similar to the trousers I used this year on the Camino del Norte The North Face Official UK Store: Jackets, Outdoor Clothing, Fleeces, Bodywarmers and Equipment and I found them to be excellent in the 5 days of rain I endured. What I discovered is that when wet they did not get cold inside and they dried very quickly. As a full length pant they succeed in keeping water out of the boots, which is pretty important.

    Yep, I'd definitely take a sleeping back in spring. As I've often said, I've frozen in May/June at the top of Focnebadon and O Cebreiro. You climb three mountain ranges in the Camino Frances and in normal weather years you'll find temps in the 5-10 degree range in late spring.

    Buen camino!
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2012
  13. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo New Member

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    Thanks a lot Huskynerd. I don´t like trousers very much, for walking, and that´s waht I´m gonna do. Just one pair of long trousers.

    About the backpack. I have two models in mind. The Osprey Talon 44 and the Osprey Kestrel 48. The Kestrel seems to be more resistent, but the Talon is 0.4 Kg lighter. Any suggestions?
     
  14. HuskyNerd

    HuskyNerd Super Moderator

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    Do the Talon and Kestrel have air suspension? That would be a must for me on any pack -- it's much, much cooler, which you never notice until it's not there. My own choice is the Osprey Atmos series. But I'm sure all the Ospreys are great.
     
  15. grayland

    grayland Member

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    If all things were otherwise equal...I would go with the lighter model. .4 kg is nearly 1 lb !!
    This would be an extra pound of weight that you would be carrying the entire camino. We all look for ways to reduce our packs by a pound or so and this would be a no-brainer if possible.
    I am looking for a lighter pack for just this reason.
     
  16. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo New Member

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    Thanks again.
    The differences between the two backpacks:

    Dimensions
    Kestrel - 48 l - 1,5 Kg
    Talon - 44 l - 1,1 Kg

    Materials:
    Kestrel - Nylon packcloth/ripstop nylon
    Talon -
    Ripstop nylon

    Frame Material:
    Kestrel -
    Aluminum/HDPE (high density polyethilen) framesheet
    Talon - Aluminum/molded foam

    Number of exterior pockets
    Kestrel - 9
    Talon - 6

    They both seems to be very nice packs. The Talon is lighter and has two small pockets on the shoulder straps (may be useful).
    The Kestrel seems to be "stronger" and the main difference is the frame material (polyethilen against foam in the Talon model).

    Any other opinions?
     
  17. HuskyNerd

    HuskyNerd Super Moderator

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    Yep, after researching these I see neither has the air suspension frame. I have another pack with the foam air channels and I must say it's significantly hotter and, hence, less comfortable. For that reason alone I'd stick with the Atmos series or similar. I believe also that these two don't have S-M-L frame sizes, which can be important to get the right fit. I think my next pack will probably be a 36L Stratos like this: Stratos 36 - Osprey Packs, Inc :2012: Official Site
     
  18. cw18

    cw18 New Member

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    I went looking at backpacks last week, and am coming down very much in favour of the Osprey EXOS 46. I tried it in a medium which seemed more than OK, but we agreed that the next time I was heading that way I call up in advance and they'll get a small in for me to try. But then the chap realised I don't need it for quite a while (I'm not planning to head out until Sept 2014 and have a different - heavier - pack I can use for training at the moment..... so he advised me to hold off until the Spring as they're bringing out a version specifically designed for females then.

    The only drawback I could see with it is that it doesn't have a raincover. The chap was adamant that everything should be packing in dry bags inside anyway, so it's not important. I'm not (as yet) convinced with that argument, but of the packs I tried it was most definitely the most comfortable in (and that was with weight bags put into them).

    If I remember rightly, the one I tried on said 1050g on the label.
     
  19. grayland

    grayland Member

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    Actually, training with the heavier pack is an advantage. I would wait until the new packs come out as almost all of them are now including a pack cover. I haven't looked at the Exos 46...but like the 2.5 weight.
    Maybe HuskyNerd can help on this as he is a Ospry user. I am interested also because of the lighter weight.
     
  20. BoxOfFrogs

    BoxOfFrogs Member

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    The exos 46 is a great little rucksack. I have removed the top lid as it is unnecessary, saves some weight and reduces the space a little. The airflow is great, frame superb and the additional pockets make organisation and access much easier.

    As for the rain cover I have simply taken one off a similar sized berghaus pack I own and have clipped it in and stuffed it inside the water bladder pouch. I also keep most things in separate waterproof compression sacks. It makes getting and finding things a little easier.

    Steve.
     
  21. nollaigc

    nollaigc New Member

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    Grayland,
    I took the plunge and bought the Exos 46- its a fantastic pack- I took it out on the 'norte' in April and it performed perfectly- in the direst of weather.
    I had done what 'BoxofFrogs' had done in relation to an external cover.
    I had originally posed the question in relation to a pack to beat the carry-on rules and it presented no problems at the airports I used it in.
    So for me its a winner.
    Nollaigc
     
  22. toadoftoadhall

    toadoftoadhall Member

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    Do you think the exos 34 is big enough? I will be taking the minimum. I have a berghaus freeflow 30 at the moment, but never found it particularly comfortable.
    Santiago due sept 2013
     
  23. Covey

    Covey Active Member

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    Books could be written on which pack is the best and what to carry!!

    The short version is that 35L is the absolute minimum and you will be carrying a very cut down kit list. I bought an Osprey Atmos 50L and have found it to be ideal for my requirements, but then I don't walk with a minimal kit list.

    I carry enough clothing so that I only have to do my laundry every 3-4 days. I could cut that down, but then I lose the flexibility of when I can do my dhobi (laundry to Brit colonial types!!). You can walk with the clothes you are wearing plus a spare set, but that means you need to do laundry every day. If the weather is not so good, then getting your clothes dried is an issue.

    You do not need anything larger than 50L cos you will be tempted to fill it up!!
     
  24. DonnaM61

    DonnaM61 New Member

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    Ah...I wouldn't tell that to a Spaniard! The Merino is a Spanish sheep, which was raised all throughout Europe well before being exported to Australia and the United States at about the same time.
     
  25. El Condor 2014

    El Condor 2014 Well-Known Member Donating Member

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    John, Thank you for all your information, EXCELLENT !
     
  26. Say Simba

    Say Simba New Member

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    Never heard of the Camino de Santiago until a few months ago, when I watched the movie "The Way." It gave me the idea to hike through Israel, which I did, and just returned from. Why stop there, I asked myself. I will hike the Camino de Santiago in April. I was delighted to find this forum and all the information it possesses. Thanks to all of you who have contributed so much, particularly in this thread. I have no doubt it will make my own pilgrimage all that I want it to be.
     
  27. El Condor 2014

    El Condor 2014 Well-Known Member Donating Member

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    Yes, You are 100% correct, MERINO sheep are originally from Spain,then the British exported the sheep to Australia.
    And Yes, I agree with you. Don’t tell a Spaniard about "Good Aussie Merino” (regards from Perth Australia);)
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2013
  28. RoryGentry

    RoryGentry New Member

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    One thing I always carry with me is a USB flash drive. I get mine from www.PexagonTech.com, but any flash drive will do. They will laser engrave your name, etc. on one side for free, and they have stock logos that they can laser engrave on the other side for free... one of which is an "EMERGENCY" logo that I asked them to make many years ago! So, I have a red flash drive on a red lanyard with this emergency logo on it, and I keep it near my passport, etc.

    On that flash drive, I have files for:
    Emergency contacts (family names, phone numbers, addresses)
    My insurance information
    My doctor's contact info
    Medications I take, and daily doses
    Blood type, etc. (I also have a blood type patch on my pack, and a lacer on my boots.)
    Copies of my passport and ID card/ driver's license
    Identifying photos (heaven forbid they find me and I'm unrecognizable!)
    My itinerary
    My packing list
    Etc...

    This flash drive is the only thing in my pack that I can fill, but it never gets heavier! ;)

    In the event that I'm severely ill or incapacitated, hopefully someone would recognize this emergency info when they find my ID (since I keep it near my passport). It could be very valuable if you have a serious medical emergency, or if your passport gets lost/ stolen/ damaged by water, etc. I also keep some of this info on my phone.
     
  29. HuskyNerd

    HuskyNerd Super Moderator

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    What a cool idea, Rory. Very smart!
     
  30. RoryGentry

    RoryGentry New Member

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    Thanks. Every once in a while, my brain kicks into gear and comes up with a good idea. :) I first did this in 2007, and have updated the info on the flash drive before every trip. (It's also a great way to never lose your packing list!) Hope this is helpful to others!

    One other thing you could do is put it in one of those waterproof/ floating keychain things, and lash it to the front of your pack, near a buckle. Just don't lose it, because that is a lot of personal info!!!

    These are older ones that I have replaced, since flash drives are much smaller now:
    Emergency USB flash drives.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2013
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