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One Pilgrim's Sure Fire Cure All Bullet Proof Camino Packing List

Discussion in 'What equipment should you use and take' started by HuskyNerd, Apr 13, 2011.

  1. vdavis

    vdavis Member

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    How did you do on your September/October 2013 camino?
     
  2. HuskyNerd

    HuskyNerd Super Moderator

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    Just told my wife about this. She's a physician in a major medical center here in the U.S. and she says the hospital won't allow staff members to plug in random flash drives into computers. They're so afraid of viruses that they carefully control any files that might elude their firewalls. I wonder if this would create a problem for other potential users too?
     
  3. RoryGentry

    RoryGentry New Member

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    Ummm... I'll have to tell you after I do it in September & October of 2013!
     
  4. RoryGentry

    RoryGentry New Member

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    I'm a police officer. I would have no problem plugging in a flash drive labeled "Emergency" that I found on a foreign tourist in distress. That would be a long way to go to introduce a virus. :) I would hope that any first responder would be more concerned with the patient's life than a computer virus. (We wouldn't want our computer to get "sick." Let that guy die!) :) Fortunately, I think most foreign countries are probably more worried about the person than a virus.
     
  5. El Condor 2014

    El Condor 2014 Well-Known Member Donating Member

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    Good luck RoryGentry, let us know when you finish El Camino, (weather, high points, low points, photos etc...) your idea of a USB flash drive is good, I will use one myself when I do El camino in May 2014, but only for my own use and to carry personal information , eg. passport numbers and a few other important info like all my phone contact numbers .
    Buen Camino !
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2013
  6. Green Tortuga

    Green Tortuga New Member

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    I like the idea of carrying a USB flash drive--done it myself on other hikes. For those that do, check out PortableApps.com--you can even install stuff like your favorite web browser (well, okay, not IE, but pretty much all of the others are options) and run it directly from your USB flash drive. Which is nice since it has all your favorite settings, bookmarks, etc. even when you're using some other strange computer. =)

    I've actually managed to cobble together an entire development system on a flash drive for the websites I manage--FTP, text editors, Apache, MySQL, PHP, e-mail clients, PuTTY, command-line prompts, MP3 players, etc. Whatever your needs are, you'll probably find something to use that can run directly off your flash drive. Very handy!

    However, I'd be a little concerned about putting my emergency information solely on a flash drive. Not that it would hurt anything, but if you're hit by a car and the paramedics need to know what you're allergic to, I suspect they might not have a computer next to them to plug in a flash drive and find the necessary information. Seems better to keep it written on a piece of paper in one's wallet or something. I bet they'd find a piece of paper in your wallet faster than they can access a computer to find out what's on your flash drive. (But you can always store a backup of the information on your flash drive--just in case the paper version gets damaged or destroyed!)

    -- Ryan
     
  7. vdavis

    vdavis Member

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    I am sorry. Got confused with dates .... thought you went this past Sept/Oct. We are leaving in a few weeks, April 25, 2013 but only doing a part of camino - starting in Leon. I will have to tell you how it went for me! Good Luck in Sept/Oct 2013!
     
  8. AmandaIngham

    AmandaIngham Guest

    We haven't decided whether to leave on 2nd or 9th October - exciting isn't it:)
     
  9. Groovey grover

    Groovey grover New Member

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    I have learned so much from all of the great experiences and insights that people have shared as I am preparing for my first Camino. Being from the extreme north part of Alaska I am worried about the heat so I am planing to take the north route in late August and Sept. I am not afraid of cold or rain, or the more challenging side of Hiking. Is it advisable to take a 4 season tent with me and camp along the way incase I get stuck in poopy weather? Also, I have read a lot of discussion about checking bags versus carry on, but not exactly why it is bad to check your bags, other than the price? I
     
  10. Groovey grover

    Groovey grover New Member

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    I am preparing for my first Camino, and being from northern Alaska, I am concerned about the heat. I am planing on taking the northern route in late August, Sept. and Oct. I am accustom to camping in very rugged and harsh weather and terrain, is it advisable to take a 4 season tent to camp along the way if I get caught in poopy weather. Also, there seams to be a lot of conversation on whether to carry on or check your bag. Other than the price, what is the issue with checking. I like having my gerber multi tool with me and my walking poles. one last question, I have a solar charger that I carried in the military that hangs on my pack for charging my phone and gear as I walk. Necessary? or is there plenty of places to charge from. I carry a lot of old habits from my military pack days. I am used to having to be more self reliant and planing for my survival, but it seams that lol, again I am over packing. Thank you for your help.
     
  11. HuskyNerd

    HuskyNerd Super Moderator

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    Hi Grover ~
    In general we suggest not bringing along a tent, since the albergue system provides inexpensive lodging and official campsites are generally few and far between. There seem to be many campsites on the Camino del Norte and fewer albergues, so if you did bring a light tent you might find you would use it one or two nights. On my CdN last year the locals promised me good weather in Jul/Aug, but rainy otherwise, but even so a 4-season tent would seem like more than what's necessary.

    As far as checking a pack on the plane, the primary reasons not to are: a) sometimes airlines lose checked luggage, b) some pack frames are delicate and the manufacturers warn against checking them on airplanes, and c) some of the plastic clips can be crushed or broken in baggage machinery. If any one of these things happen while you're going to Spain it could end your camino or add significant expense right at the start. If you're bringing poles or a pocket knife tool you can bring a small box along with you and check just those items, then toss the box when you arrive.

    Buen camino!
     
  12. Green Tortuga

    Green Tortuga New Member

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    I wouldn't bother with a tent at all, but if you do, you'll probably be more than comfortable with a 3-season tent. I haven't actually walked the northern route, but I can't imagine the weather there is that bad during the August-October period!

    -- Ryan
     
  13. Regina38

    Regina38 New Member

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    Re poles: I plan to bring a Hammacher Schlemmer collapsible aluminum (shock corded) walking stick with me. Checked with airline security three weeks ago. The TSA says it's fine to pack the stick in my backpack.
     
  14. Squirrel

    Squirrel Guest


    I would take the tent if I were you. The northern route is less popular than the camino frances and consequently, less developed. There are fewer albergues and more distance between them. The terrain is also more hilly. As the foot traffic isn't quite as heavy, the albergues close sooner than those on the busy camino frances. You're planning for late August, September and October when the days are shorter, going into the chilly months and you'll be at a higher elevation near the sea. You might get caught by nightfall and have to weather out a cold and damp night. I'd get a lightweight one-person tent with fly sheet and footprint. Sierra Designs, MSR, et al. make very nice ultralight tents that pack down easy. Walking poles are great on the northern route - they give you something to do with your hands and steady your gait. I like them.

    As for checking your pack, I am all for carrying it on because of the worry that the airline might lose your only piece of luggage. If you're packing a stove, you'll not be able to carry it onboard if there is even a whiff of gas from it. Same for re-fillable fuel canisters. If you want these and your own multi-tool, you can mail it ahead to the first hostel you stay at and collect it when you arrive. You'l probably have to communicate this intention to the hotel staff beforehand to make sure they don't mark it "return to sender" or bin it. Otherwise, there are plenty of camping and hardware (ferreteria) shops in the bigger cities where you will be able to pick up what you need.

    If you're going alone, like your gadgets and use them a lot when you're hiking normally, I'd say take the charger. You can always mail it home if you find it too cumbersome or don't use it.

    Good luck and buen camino!

    northern route 2003
    camino frances 2005 (+ additional month hiking the wrong way on GR65)
    appalachian trail 2007
     
  15. Rolland

    Rolland New Member

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    Hi, I'm doing the Northern Way starting from July 20th, do you think a simple cloth sleeping bag will do?
     
  16. HuskyNerd

    HuskyNerd Super Moderator

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    It probably will be just fine. If there's anytime of the year when it would work on the CdN, that'd be it.
     
  17. Katie W

    Katie W New Member

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    Hello,
    I have really appreciated all the forum advice (boots, poles, packs etc) and have most of my gear ready for a late August 2013 start. My husband and I plan 5 weeks to Santiago from St Jean. Two questions: Although I've prepared a pack, I've heard of a "pack service" and I'm curious if there's a service in every town? Is it reliable? Also I'm wondering if anyone has used the luggage storage service in Santiago? (http://www.caminodesantiago.me/luggage-storage-in-santiago-de-compostela/) We want to holiday for a week after we finish and I would like to send non-camino items ahead. Thanks again for the fantastic information!
     
  18. Say Simba

    Say Simba New Member

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    Walked into Santiago Friday, 14 June 2013 around 8am. Overall, I would say the 800 and more kilometers from SJPP with the pack and weight recommendations I gathered here on this thread before leaving played out accurate. I still dropped stuff early on, like my Hawaiian shirt I thought I would wear at the end of the trip, thinking it would get nice and balmy, but it never did. I think when I put the pack down at the ticket counter to check it in it weighed 9.4 kilos. I myself weighed in at 93.9. I had lost about 13 kilos on the trek, and my pack about 6. Great recommendations started here on this forum and thread. Thanks again.
     
  19. Groovey grover

    Groovey grover New Member

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    wow thanks for all the good advice. My father has decided to join me and he had a great idea and that is to expand on your original idea of the small box. We bought used cheep hard case luggage that our packs will fit into and check the hole pack and when we get over their we will mail the luggage ahead or home and or to the hotel in Santiago and reuse for our trip home.

    I also remember reading a thread about what info to take and what form to have it in. For instance medical, family contacts, copy of passports etc, etc. USB flash drive? or paper in water proof bags? Any help on linking me to that thread would be helpful, thanks Groovey grover.
     
  20. cowboylou

    cowboylou New Member

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    The use of WP dry bags definitly helps with organization and water proofing, the weight for 2 or 3 is not significant. A special water proof pancho designed for back packs is also a good option to keep you and your pack dry and is light weight.
     
  21. Francis

    Francis New Member

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    I am planning to walk starting around April 21, 2014. Planning and prep has started with a gear list, some purchases, spanish language class and physical training, not to mention more than a little excitement and anxiety. This discussion and packing lists are invaluable. I note that there is no specific sleepwear listed and wonder what is acceptable etiquette in the hostel.
     
  22. tjenkins

    tjenkins New Member

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    Check out the Osprey 50L - get pack, good size for the camino, fairly light, and could be used for camping/hiking at home...
     
  23. Tyson

    Tyson New Member

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    Hi, I am buying stuff for Apr camino walk. I saw a few people stating they have 3 sets of shoes. One for walking. One sandal for relaxing at albergue and one for camp shoes for like restaurant.

    What puzzles me is that I am trying to minimize backpack weight. After finding the ultra light walking shoes, now I find out sandals are heavier than walking shoes. In addition, I don't see why I need to carry the 3-rd pair for camp shoes.

    Anyone have recommendations for a more formal-looking, fast-to-dry, ultra-light sandals that one can use in shower, walking around albergue and not be embarrassed at restaurant?
     
  24. fraluchi

    fraluchi 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015

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    You'll manage most off-hike situations with Crocs!:)
     
  25. highlander

    highlander Donating Member Donating Member

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    Tyson

    you can mange like thousands do with a very light weight pair of flip flops, for around town, restaurants & shower.....so all you need is your walking footwear and flip-flops.
    I wear similar ones to these------- flip flop 4.jpg flip flop 5.jpg flip flop.jpg .perfectly normal to be wearing these types without socks in Restaurants on the Camino......thousands do it every day in them...and so do I..
     
  26. KatDavis

    KatDavis Member

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    Hi Tyson,

    Everyone's different but I just take 2 pairs of shoes - my trail shoes and then a pair of Teva Tirra's which I wear in the shower and around town. They dry pretty quick and if they're wet or it's cold I just wear a pair of socks with them. They're also a good back-up for me in case anything happens to my trail shoes and I did wear them a few days on the Portuguese camino to give my feet a break during a heatwave.

    Buen Camino!

    Kat
     
  27. Dutch

    Dutch Member

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    My name is Dutch, so...guess :)
    One pair of shoes and one pair of flipflops for the shower and to walk around town. Works great for me.
     
  28. lucymi

    lucymi Member

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    As mentioned by others, you won't need 3 pairs of shoes, your walking shoes plus cheapie flipflops or sandals should be fine - but not both. And don't worry about being embarassed at restaurants when wearing your boots/walking shoes. Most places you eat/drink in will be down to earth, family run local eateries and bars and they are used to pilgrims.
     
  29. Tyson

    Tyson New Member

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    I will start out May from Seville towards Salamanca thru Via de La Plata.
    It's my first and I have never camp before so some questions may be really basic
    I wonder if ex-peregrinos can share their experiences

    My questions
    1, I'd like to get my morning started with hot drinking water. Should I bring my own water boiler?
    2, Do most albergues have pillows? Should I bring just pillow case?
    3, Hanging washed clothes, I am not sure how that works. Are there metal loops to attach my cloth lines ? Is in part of bed or in common area?
    4, I will have my sandals tied to outside my backpack. Not sure what's the best way to do that. There are loops on my Northface backpack. Do I buy some straps to tie my sandals?
     
  30. highlander

    highlander Donating Member Donating Member

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    Hello Tyson

    Answers
    1)I have not been in a albergue without hot drinking water yet (I take a pocket rocket because I camp or will stay in hotels this camino....you will be looked at very oddly if you start asking for hot water as your first question. its wi-fi now...if there is a albergue with out a kitchen and no cafe near by for the morning tea or coffee, just ask the owner and I am sure they will help you out..

    2) yes they do have pillows, bedbugs. I would bring a treated pillow case poly/cotton treated sheet....treated yourself with permethrin spray. in the states look for sawyer permethrin spray. once dry it leaves no smell and is harmless to you. a lot of albergues are unable to wash the sheets everyday.. in Spain last year they started treating albergues (the ones that bother)with a natural product .....it does not work, we saw three albergues with bedbugs and was shown the certificates, then told the explanation...we left and camped in my tent. which was a shame because these were nice places..you can buy a treated cover in a outdoor shop ,but they do not always fit properly.its up to you....places with protectors on mattresses-tiled floors and metal beds are easier to clean but not immune from people bringing them from other albergues....it takes just one person...many people never have bedbugs problems....bedbugs are not fussy if a albergue or hotel is clean or dirty

    3)wash your clothes after you stopped walking ,either in the outdoor area provided, in the shower discreetly or in the washing machine if they have them.almost all have washing liquid for the machines....hanging your clothes out on the lines provided or take a few meters of shock cord which I do and hang my clothes up some place.....with some pegs I carry...the shock cord stretches, so 2 meters is plenty for me...you can buy a small wash line with hooks each end.
    OK for underwear and socks. not long enough to wash all my kit each day....you can always improvise Tyson....sometimes they have these frames to hang your clothes on...... dry a.jpg dry b.jpg
    4) if your have side compartments on the side of your rucksack put your sandals in there.......you could take a plastic band to keep them together..you could then put them in a little plastic bag then secure them through a loop......or buy a small carabiner and attach them to a loop. kara.jpg

    Tyson....security advice.......for the camino and else where..take your passport with your everywhere.shower-toilet,and bed, in you sleeping bag...you can buy a passport size aqua pack(waterproof) for your passport .. I have a waterproof wallet also for my money......when you shower put the passport and wallet into your trouser leg or inside your boots or shirt.so that there is no way you can by accident leave it behind..take ear plugs
     

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