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Places To Sleep And Some Tips

Discussion in 'The Camino Portugues' started by Sunny, Jul 30, 2017.

  1. Sunny

    Sunny New Member

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    Hi there. I finished my Camino Portugese coastal route in Early July, 2017. I was a solo female traveller and felt the route was safe. The weather was pretty nice but scorching hot in the afternoon. I want to share where I slept and minor information which might be useful!

    1. Porto (Matosinhos)

    - Took the subway to Matosinhos. Hard to find the arrows in the beginning but follow the ocean. (Note: the multiple trains heading to different routes arrive at the same railroad so read where the train goes before you step in)

    2. Vila do Conde

    - Bellamar Hostel : (~15 euro) breakfast bag provided. Good. Sheets were provided. Market closeby and many restaurants to choose from.

    3. Esposende

    - Eleven hostel: (12 euro): 8 bed room. A light breakfast provided in the morning.

    - A local recommended this fine restaurant called “agua pe”. Great food and wine for 20-25 euro per person.
    - Be aware of stray dogs on the way to Viana de Castelo

    4. Viana do Castelo

    - Posada de Juventude (>10 euro): sheets were provided. Breakfast included (ham, cheese, juice. Toast.baguette.)

    - Nice city. Take your time to look around.

    5. Paco

    - Casa de Sardao : (~12 euro): Sheets were so nice and comfy. Stone house. very antique place with details. Must go to a market and restaurant (~ 20 mins away by walk) before you sleep at this place. Wash and dry are available. It has a beautiful kitchen with dogs, sheeps and horses. A place that felt like home because we cooked and had a dinner together. Breakfast not provided.

    6. A guarda

    - I am so glad that I did not sleep at Caminha because I heard people could not take the ferry in the morning and had to wait or take a taxi. If you can walk a little more (~ 6 km) from Caminha, I would recommend you go to a ferry dock and see if the ferry is available now. If it is, take it and go to A guarda albergue.

    - Albergue de guarda (6 euro): OK. Sheets were provided. No shower curtain. About 20 beds available.

    7. Mougas

    - Albergue Aguncheiro (<10 euro): OK. Sheets were provided. No market nearby but a restaurant right next to it. Located right next to the Ocean. You can swim if you like and it is a perfect place to chill!

    8. Ramallosa

    - Albergue Pazo Pias (~16 euro): a single / two single beds in one room. Price is same per person. Shared bathroom but a sink was in each room.

    9. Redondela

    - Albergue de peregrines (6 euro): passed by the first albergue and this one was the second one. Although I arrived late, I was able to stay in a handicapped room. Great! My friends did not like this place since it was really crowded-almost 30 people slept on the 2nd floor.

    - (the first albergue was 12 euro and heard it’s more nice)

    10. Pontevedra

    - The albergues are around ~15-20 minutes walk to the city center.

    - I stayed at Casa Alicia. $15 /person for 4 people. $30 for one person in 3 beds room (2 single beds and 1 double bed). The foam bed was so nice and I slept pretty well. Shared bathroom. No kitchen.

    - The city is modern and touristic. I would recommend you to stay in the city center if you can and book it in advance.

    11. Valga

    - Albergue de peregrinos (6 euro): pretty nice and clean. No market nearby. But a restaurant (5 min away) sells breads, sausage, water, fruits, etc,.

    12. Teo

    - Albergue de teo (6 euro): OK. No shower curtains. Market is 1 km away. 2 restaurants nearby.

    13. Santiago de Compostela

    - Your choice.

    Tips on what and what not to bring (keep it mind that I walked in the summer)


    - Headlamp: The sunrise was around 6:30 am. You might need it or not depending on how early you want to leave. You might also use it in the albergue when the light is off. I used it once or twice. My phone light was enough if you are not too worried about the battery.

    - Jackknife: I didn’t need it. The kitchen had a knife that I could use to cook.

    - Poncho: did not rain when I was walking. Just bring a dollar store poncho.

    - Sandal: Bring it! Your feet need to breathe after you walked miles.

    - Toe socks: I live with my blisters but these saved my life. I ended up wearing this one socks everyday.

    - Compeed: if you already have a blister that is huge, these don’t help and may make things worse. Use it only if you have a tiny one or if you want to prevent blisters on a high pressure spot.

    - Sleeping bag: Mine was the lightest one that I could find (650 mg) but I wish I had a lighter one. (any suggestions for Canadians). The other pilgrim said the liner was enough. Half of my hostels and/or albergue provided sheets.

    - Earplugs: 100% guarantee you will need it

    - Sfork: no need to buy expansive ones. Just bring a plastic one from dollar store.

    - Ziplock bag: bring a few and you will need it for leftover / breakfast sandwich

    - Bathing suit: you might need it if you want privacy because some albergue bathroom do not have shower curtains.

    - Guide book: I am glad I did not bring the Brierley book since I heard it did not have much info on coastal route. Pilgrims from Germany carried the guide book called Outdoor which was way better than Brierley book.

    - Trekking pole: I bought mine but did not bring it because of the weight (Buy the light one). There were times I wish I had it because of the injury but probably you won't need it. You can pick up or buy a stick on the way if you really need it.

    - Two sources I used so much…

    1. Places to sleep (not complete)

    https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...df-route-portugues-route-monacal-coastal.404/

    2. Download the google map from this link after downloading the pdf file. It saved my life when I was lost or could not find an arrow. However, the location of restaurants and albergue in this map are not updated and may not be available.

    http://www.caminador.es/?page_id=1934

    would I recommend the coastal route? Yes! I would say you only get to walk nearby the ocean half of the time.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2017
  2. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    Hi Sunny

    Very useful trek report – Thank you for taking the time to post this up to date information – I am sure that in will prove invaluable to those following in your footsteps.

    Just one question – Which Camino will you walk next ?? :)

    Best Regards

    Rob
     
  3. Wily

    Wily Francés 2016; Portugués 2017; Inglés/Fisterra 2018

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    Hey Sunny - Excellent information! Thanks for sharing those two links neither of which I was familiar with. As folks look for information on the Coastal route, this information on albergues with maps will be very useful.

    Great tips for pilgrims regardless of the Camino they are walking. Regarding sleeping bags, mine is a Swedish bag by Fjallraven, but it is available in North America as I purchased mine through Amazon. It's a bit lighter than yours (480 g), and has been great on two Caminos now. Although some like just a sleeping sheet, I like the little extra a bag offers plus this one is nice and light. Bom Caminho!
     
  4. Sunny

    Sunny New Member

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    To be honest, I am not sure yet. I have not walked the french route yet. I will consider the french route during off season!
     
  5. Sunny

    Sunny New Member

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    I will search for it! Thanks! I found it's chilly at night even in the summer.
     
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  6. Wily

    Wily Francés 2016; Portugués 2017; Inglés/Fisterra 2018

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    Hey Sunny - On both of my Caminos, I've never regretted carrying the sleeping bag. First, as you said, even in the summer, some nights can be chilly. I found it also comforting on the wet days to help take off the chill. Second, at only 480g for this one-season bag, the weight it adds to my kit, in comparison to a sleeping sheet, is minimal. Even carrying a bag instead of a sheet, I kept my load down under 6 kg. Careful selection of everything I carry allowed for the light load. Finally, if I were ever to get caught outside overnight, having a sleeping bag would be worth it's weight in gold! Although yours isn't that much heavier than mine, I'm very pleased with the quality of the Fjallraven. Bom Caminho!
     
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