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Shin Splints

Discussion in 'Medical Problems' started by JFK, Jun 15, 2015.

  1. JFK

    JFK Member

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    This was one medical issue that I did not read much about before the Camino but met a lot of people, including me, that had a painful shin splint in one leg. Mine occurred about 8-10 days into the Camino and lasted well over a week. (I am in fairly good shape and carried about a 10-11 Kilo pack.)

    I was able to remedy the severe shin splint with ibuprofen, stretching, massaging, and elevation, rest and ice. But it took a while for the pain to finally disappear.

    Could anyone else comment on how they remedied their shin splints? Any prevention that future pilgrims can do ahead of time?

    Thanks.
     
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  2. Leslie

    Leslie Administrator

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    Sorry, this is a problem that I have yet to encounter.

    That said, I have been told that by slowing down you can avoid this happening, I don't know if that is the case though.

    That was some pack size...
     
  3. Cornelius

    Cornelius Member

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    Been there, done that... Too far and too fast seems to be the cause of this painful lower leg condition. It seems to occur whenever we change our exercise pattern radically and the Camino is (for most of us) just such. Graduated training in distance, frequency and weight and a steady start to the actual walk seem to be the best strategy in order to avoid it. Weight carried (internally and externally!) is a major factor (old soldier talking). Treatment that worked for me was immediate rest (at least 24hrs), 600mg Ibuprofen tablets twice daily (or as advised by pharmacist), cut down on pack weight or make use of baggage transfer service (I know you feel that's somehow cheating but...), use 2 correctly adjusted walking poles and drink loads of water (before, during and after walking). It still hurt some but I made it to the end and plan on going again. Buen Camino!
     
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  4. JFK

    JFK Member

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    Thanks Cornelius. That is an excellent prescription. I was unprepared for this pain but pushed through. In hindsight, I should have rested. Hopefully others will see your post and prepare. There were many pilgrims that I talked to that experienced this condition. A few ended up taking taxis for a day or two.

    Can't wait for my second time around either. Buen Camino.
     
  5. stevelm1

    stevelm1 The Happy Peregrino Donating Member

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    This is not much help after the fact but I used to get shin sprints a lot while in training when walking on hard surfaces especially. I found the more I trained on hard surfaces the less this happened, now I rarely have this problem. So for those yet to go, this might be helpful information. If I recall from Brierley correctly, about 40% of the Way is asphalt or other hard surfaces these days, so practicing on hard trails as well as soft ones is a good idea.

    I am also training with more weight in my pack than I plan to carry on the Camino, right now it is 5 pounds over what I expect to carry. This should help with the physical transition from homebody in training to a daily walking Peregrino.

    Of course this is all theoretical at this point as I have not walked one step on the Camino, yet. But I know from my training that these two concepts are working well for me at this point.
     
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  6. olgadino

    olgadino Guest

    Hi, just back from walking the Frances, started at VillaFranca to Santiago. Took the recommended route which was very steep with high inclines, so not that clever. Also suffered a shin splint, now need Physio for a few days and hopefully the swelling and paIn will subside. Treated it with Ibobrupen 600mg and lots of massage and ice packs when resting. I pushed on each day but sent backpack on as I felt more strain on foot. Glad I did that as it can eventually cause a tiny fracture.
    Take care, stretch the legs and buen Camino
     
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  7. howardd5

    howardd5 Member

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    On a camino in2012 i met a Germann physio who showed me how to treat a shin splint and i have been very successful with it .there is a tendon that goes from your big toe to the front of your shin. It can become inflamed and walking. can become continuily painfull. this tendon is covered by a shief that is normally lubracated with a liquid . but thru irration or injury the shief becomes inflamed and the lubracating liquid become thick with white bloodcells. The treatment involves massage. plapatating the painfull area to break up the thickend mass and move it up the tendon and also pushing the mass down the tendon to clear it out of the painfull area. it takes pressure and time but the swelling will go down and the pain will get less . Aleve helps the swelling and ice at the end helps. by the next morning most people were able to walk on without much discomfort. Darrell
     
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  8. superfast

    superfast New Member

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    Last edited: May 3, 2018
  9. YorkieUltraRunner

    YorkieUltraRunner Ultra Runner

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    Rest is the main response to shin splits as it is usually a time on feet and loading weight on your legs and so you can look at your actual body weight as when that reduces, the load on your body reduces and also the weight that you are carrying as again, this all travels down your legs and also the impact on hard surfaces goes through your legs.
     
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