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Sleeping Bags Required Or Not.

Discussion in 'Camino Frances' started by Goonky, Mar 22, 2015.

  1. Goonky

    Goonky New Member

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    Just a quick question.
    I start my Camino on the 4th of April at St Jean and i am wondering if I should bring my sleeping bag or just my silk liner. Currently the temperature here in Queensland at night is minimum 18 degrees centigrade. Any body who is currently on the Camino or has just finished I would appreciate your advice.
    Many thanks.
     
  2. sean

    sean Active Member

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    Hi Goonky,
    Bring your sleeping bag, as it will be cold at night. You may get some snow, certainly you will have sleet. Layer up on clothing and bring a warm hat, together with gloves. Even during the day, the cold can catch you out. I walked it first in April 2009 and stopped to remove a stone from my boot. It took me about 20 minutes to get my boot back on and tied properly, as my hands had frozen. I ended up walking to the next town with all my spare walking socks on my hands, until I bought a pair of gloves.
    Enjoy your Camino.
    Sean,
    Dublin
     
  3. Leslie

    Leslie Administrator

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    Even in Aug and Sep in some places I was glad I had my sleeping bag. The tops of the hills can get chilly even in summer, though I do know that most wouldn't carry a sleeping bag during the summer.
     
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  4. raymond john

    raymond john Well-Known Member

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    When I walked the camino last year 22nd Sept - 25th Oct A number of the pilgrims only used silk liners and if it got cold used a blanket provided by the Albergue.
    Have a fantastic time
    Beun Camino

    Raymond John
    England
     
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  5. Goonky

    Goonky New Member

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    Thanks for the input. Will take sleeping bag and liner as advised. Both been treated with permythrin for bed bugs so all good.
     
  6. UnkleHammy

    UnkleHammy Well-Known Member

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    Hi

    I will start waking from Saint Jean in early May.

    Is there any reason to actually carry a sleeping bag? I will have a nice bag liner with me and it seems as though most places have blankets to use. (I'll also have a pillow case with me. If there is no pillow available, I'll use my extra clothes as stuffing.)

    I do not plan to camp out. I normally hike int California's Sierra Nevada mountains and there is no such thing as a place to stay that is near the trails, so I usually carry every thing I need on my back.

    The Camino seems to be quite civilized and is a sleeping bag really needed for a May June walk?
     
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  7. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    Whether or not to carry a sleeping bag is an often debated question on here and different people have differing views.

    My own is that I always carry a sleeping bag and my reasons for doing so are that, although I might not use it very often, when I do need it, I have it – It can come in very handy if you arrive at a Refugio and find that all the beds are taken as many Refugio’s offer floor space when all the beds are gone, also there are some Simple Refugio’s and Overflow Refugio’s that don’t offer bedding, so by carrying a sleeping bag, it does open up the possibility of a reasonable night’s sleep in circumstances like this.

    However, If you have a large budget and can afford either to hop into a taxi and/or afford hotel accommodation if you find yourself in a similar position, then taking a sleeping bag yourself might not be necessary.

    Good Luck and Buen Camino

    Rob

    PS – Although I always carry a sleeping bag, I have never packed a pillow and instead use my fleece jacket wrapped up in a T-Shirt if one isn’t available
     
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  8. raymond john

    raymond john Well-Known Member

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    Unklehammy
    I'm a convert to silk liners, It reduces the backpack weight, and I have not experienced arriving at a Refugio where all the bed have been taken and have been offered floor space. I understand where this has happened they have put mattress on the floor. However, on the occasion that situation should arise, I would be happy to pay the extra for staying in a Casa Rural. In the end it's a matter of choice.

    Buen Camino

    Raymond John
     
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  9. UnkleHammy

    UnkleHammy Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. I am trying to reduce my pack weight and this looks as though it is "just in case" item, which makes it optional.
     
  10. UnkleHammy

    UnkleHammy Well-Known Member

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    As of now, I'll go "bagless" but "liner plus"
     
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  11. YorkieUltraRunner

    YorkieUltraRunner Ultra Runner

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    I am going with a silk and bacterial treated liner
     
  12. raymond john

    raymond john Well-Known Member

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    Unklehammy.
    Im going to work as a volunteer Hospilatero at the CSJ Refguio Gaucelmo in Rabanal de Camino in September. Its a wonderful place to stay, they make you feel very welcome. Its very british we serve afternoon tea between 16;00-17.00, and breakfast. There is also a kitchen & laundry facilities. Its all by donation only and the volunteers come from all over the world. Its located next to a Benedictine monastery and the monks often pop in to say Hola.
    The Confraternity of St James (CSJ) are a UK-based charity established to promote the pilgrimage to the shrine of St James in Santiago de Compostela. We provide a range of information services to assist prospective pilgrims, of all religions or none, who are planning a walking, cycling or horseback journey along one of the many Camino de Santiago routes.

    Carpe Diem

    Raymond John
     
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  13. Crepes4Suzette

    Crepes4Suzette Well-Known Member

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    Me too - I froze several places even WITH mine in both September and October. My lightweight $19.99 sleeping bag became like a comfort blankie that was nice to return to every night.
     
  14. Brucepayne

    Brucepayne Member

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    I walked the primitive last september,and took only a silk liner. I started out being warm on a number of nights,but before dawn, found myself fumbling around putting on clothes. With all of my clothes on,it was still not warm. Those around me in sleeping bags seemed to be warm and slept pea awfully through the night. Of course people can choose for themselves,but on my next camino, I will be taking a bag!
     
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  15. Crepes4Suzette

    Crepes4Suzette Well-Known Member

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    Bruce, that's really helpful information. I'll be on the Primitivo in late June and was thinking it probably could get really cold, even in June, because of the elevation. Thank you!
     
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  16. Devereaux Young

    Devereaux Young Member

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    How was the weather when you did the Camino?
    Rain? Cold? Hot?
    I'm looking at the same dates.
     
  17. Brucepayne

    Brucepayne Member

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  18. Brucepayne

    Brucepayne Member

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    I was wondering mostly which camino you did? Each one is probably different. The Primitivo seems to never get too hot. Check out the temps in Oviedo and Lugo. Buen camino.
     
  19. Brucepayne

    Brucepayne Member

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    The hottest it got on the primitivo,starting September 1, was about 65 degrees, and in got into the low 40's at night. Biomorto had quilts for rent(yes, I went through Friol,and would recommend it),and no other alberque that I stayed in had blankets! Grado,Bodenaya,Castro,Lugo,Friol,Sobrado,Lavacola,Meson in Santiago.
     
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  20. Crepes4Suzette

    Crepes4Suzette Well-Known Member

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    Well then I have some questions for you, Bruce. After reading several blogs by people who had difficulty doing the path Lugo-Friol and Friol-Sobrado, I'm planning on taking the Empresa Freire from Lugo to Arzua and then Arzua to Sobrado. I know females have done it alone before, but it looks pretty isolated and I've had trouble being lost and running across some massive and vicious dogs. Did you find the signage easy? There's a bus also Lugo to Friol, and I was wondering if the second day Friol to Sobrado was any easier a hike. Was there much elevation gain? Thanks for mentioning that - I've been hoping to find someone who had done that to ask. You stayed at Casa Benigno in Friol then?
     
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  21. raymond john

    raymond john Well-Known Member

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    Devereaux
    The reason I chose late September - October. From my research ,the weather is very settled at this time of year not to hot but can be cool in the mornings, I only had two days of heavy rain, plus some light showers ( I didn't stop to put on any wet gear). and in my opinion good walking weather. Another advantage is is not so crowded.
    This year Im going to work as a volunteer Hospilatero at the CSJ Refguio Gaucelmo in Rabanal de Camino in the last 2 weeks of October (15th -1st) Nov , prior to shutting it down for the winter . Its a wonderful place to stay, they make you feel very welcome. Its very british we serve afternoon tea between 16;00-17.00, and breakfast. There is also a kitchen & laundry facilities. Its all by donation only and the volunteers come from all over the world. Its located next to a Benedictine monastery and the monks often pop in to say Hola.
    The Confraternity of St James (CSJ) is a British Charity set to promote the camino. We have an excellent website csj.org.uk its full of useful information.
    The only advice is travel light as possible, I carried no more the 6kg. I assume you will be walking from SJPP and over the Pyrenees on the Route de Napoleon. Be aware of the the walk down from the Col de lepoeder to Roncesvalles, is a very steep downhill stage through the woods, you may wish to walk down on the road its appox 1 .5 Km longer but a much easer to walk down. Please accept my apologise if you already aware this steep downhill section

    You will have a fantastic time meeting and sharing with Pilgrims from all over the world.

    Buen Camino & Carpe Diem.

    Raymond John
     
  22. Brucepayne

    Brucepayne Member

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    The trip to Sobrado was pretty flat and easy to walk. It was well marked with green paint everywhere. The previous comments about it being muddy and hard to follow no longer seem to apply. There were some dogs but not more than elsewhere,and actually few villages to walk through. There is little infrastructure outside of Friol,which is quite a large town. It is quiet and pretty and reminds me of the walk to Muxia. The first part of the trip from Lugo is pure magic,the best part of the whole walk. The monastery in Sobrado had scalding hot water,and I walked a short day to Biomorto and then went to Lavacola and then to Santiago,compleyely avoiding the Francis. From Boimorto to Santiago,the way was well marked,and was a pleasant way to go. If you have any questions,please let me know. Buen Camino
     
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  23. Brucepayne

    Brucepayne Member

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    Yes I did stay there in Friol. It was very nice with an attached restaurant with good food. I strongly recommend going this way,and even through Lavacola.
     
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  24. Crepes4Suzette

    Crepes4Suzette Well-Known Member

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    Thank you SO MUCH, Bruce! I can get to Boimorto. Someone said the way to Ste. Irene was difficult to follow (and then to Lavacolla), but it sounds like you didn't find it so, so maybe that's the way to go. Much appreciated!
     
  25. calowie

    calowie Active Member

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    Crepes: We left Lugo for Friol, and we were not the only ones. We found the day long and on too many roads, but we travelled with a German with the perfect guide book that said to follow the roads. We stayed in an albergue with a restaurant attached that gave us an ENORMOUS peregrino meal! Walking to Sobrado was relatively easy, although we took several alternative routes and talked with many locals! Walking into Sobrado was interesting because this is where a variant of the Norte and the primitivo meet- at the monastery. We started to see people we did not know, and met some we had not seen in weeks! Once we left Sobrado and stopped for coffee in Boimorto we took a direct (!) route to Santa Irene. Others went to Arzua- we sort of cut off a corner. We found this stage flat and boring and too much road, but we got there with some sore feet and stayed at the municipal albergue. This was culture shock as we started to see so many people merging in from the Camino Frances.
     
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  26. Brucepayne

    Brucepayne Member

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    The route was well marked the whole way.The path along the river out of Lugo was worth the whole trip! A German girl who went with us followed the german guodebook and walked on the road the whole way. If I knew how I would semd you some pictures. None of what I read about both the green way,or the way to lavacola turned out to be true. What suprised me was an alternate route into Santiago which compleyely avoided the francis hoard. If you have any reservations I will try to answer them. Going to medide on the primitivo,or going to Sobrado on the norte would seem to be poor choices,at least on my opinion,and I am not in the pay of the Friol Chamber of Commerce,although my comments might easily give one that impression!
     
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  27. Crepes4Suzette

    Crepes4Suzette Well-Known Member

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    Thank you Calowie! You've helped so much with your blog about the Primitivo too. I haven't decided which way to go, but it would be good to miss the crowds on the last stretch. I've taken the AC-934 on Google Earth and it doesn't look like much fun to walk, especially alone, but if there are others to walk around, that might be fine. I love running across people that I haven't seen for awhile on Camino (usually;)). Was your impression that the monastery was important to see? It's been described as so atmospheric that it sounds intriguing. That's good information about the road to St. Irene.
     
  28. Crepes4Suzette

    Crepes4Suzette Well-Known Member

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    I believe you:D. I've heard good things about the river walk to Friol and Casa Benigno, will just have been away for a long time doing a few weeks of the LePuy, coming down to walk only a few coastal days of the Norte, and then going down to Oviedo to cut across the Primitivo to Lugo.

    This will be my 4th Camino, and the 5th trip over to do them, so I don't mind missing the last section of walking - I like Santiago and would probably want to leave from their airport or via the bus to Porto. I have a bad attitude about Melide and wouldn't walk back through ever again it if didn't have to. I was slammed into and pickpocketed in a grocery store, my backpack got missed in the lobby of the pension that one day I had it transported, and there were kids still partying in the plazas at 07:00 from the night before - I was glad to get out of that town the last time through.
     
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  29. calowie

    calowie Active Member

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    Crepes: We went Lugo-Friol-Sobrado-Santa Irene partially because the monastery intrigued us but also because we wanted to postpone linking up with the hordes of people on the Camino Frances. We had become used to 10-12 people we would see regularly on the primitivo. So we took the differently marked route from Lugo to Friol and then to the monastery. We separated from our friend with the German guide book because that only indicated the roads- and went a bit cross country, cow tracks, etc, and ended up being the first ones to check into the monastery. We really loved it- it was special, but we had stayed at several along the Norte as well. If you did not like Melide and that area- you can avoid it! But if you do not need to walk into Santiago there will be buses along the way to connect with buses to Porto. Have fun!
     
  30. Brucepayne

    Brucepayne Member

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    I would recommend stopping in Bodenaya,calling ahead,and in Castro. The albergue is in an old schoolhouse and the small village is a treat to explore. I jogged down the hill to the dam,and managed to go up the other side as far as Castro. I envy you the trip but not being so early in the year. Buen Camino!
     
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