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Some Thoughts On My Latest 5 Days On The Cf

Discussion in 'Camino Frances' started by Greg Canning, Oct 2, 2017.

  1. Greg Canning

    Greg Canning Well-Known Member

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    Hi all

    Just back from an all too short 5 days on the Camino Frances from Fromista to Leon and thought I would share some thoughts/experiences:-

    1. 5 days is way too short but is better than not being on Camino :)

    2. The weather at this time of year, particularly in the mornings, was just perfect for walking, afternoons could still get pretty warm and even hot so get up early, leave by dawn if you can and get finished before the heat of the afternoon really builds up;

    3. The accommodation was generally very good and some were exceptionally good for the price. The places I stayed are below with the price paid (for a double room in each case) -

    - Fromista, I remember C4S previously recommending the Hotel Dona Mayor and it lived up to it's recommendation. Very clean and comfortable at €80 for the room (not cheap for the Camino but definitely a nice treat). For info the manager told us they generally close from early November to early April (Easterish) which is why we couldn't book for our walk earlier in April this year.

    - Carrion de los Condes - Casa Tia Paula, this was actually an apartment and again was very clean. There are cooking facilities but it is on the far side of the town just over the bridge (this meant we had a long walk back to the Santa Clara abbey for Vespers). Big bonus here was a spa bath which was most welcome after our first day on the trail. €50 for the room.

    -Terradillos de los Templarios- Albergue Los Templarios, again very clean and comfortable and after our first day walking on the Roman Road, a welcome site just before the village (€38 for the room). We ate here and the pilgrim menu was fine, pretty standard pilgrim menu for €10.

    - Calzadilla de Los Hermanillos - Albergue Via Trajana - probably the most welcome sight on the Camino EVER :) :). We arrived here late (around 5pm) after a long hot slog on the Roman Road from Calzada del Coto (only 8 kms but a real slog in the heat of the afternoon, we had lunched in Sahagun and lost a bit of time getting our half-way Compostellas). The albergue is lovely and clean and catching up with the rest of the "sloggers" for a drink on the outside terrace was fun. Nice peregrino meal too. Highly recommended (€35).

    - Mansilla de las Mulas - La Pension de Blanca - very nice and very clean place. (€40) - only problem in Mansillas was a a pretty awful dinner and from talking to others it seems it was a common experience in this town.

    - Leon - Hospederia Monastica Pax - an absolute treat. This is a hotel in a restored Benedictine monastery which is still in operation and has 19 nuns in residence. The ground floor is an Albergue with the hotel located on the second and third floors. The room was fabulous with the biggest bathroom ever and a huge spa bath. Not cheap at €129 but far cheaper than the Parador (€205 for the same night) and I am sure as luxurious. A real treat to end our short Camino. The staff were lovely and you can attend all the services and a pilgrim blessing. The location is great as well just a few minutes walk from the Cathedral.

    - Madrid for our flight home - AC Hotel Madrid Feria (€79) - a good business class hotel near to the airport. I wouldn't necessarily suggest if you wanted to visit Madrid itself as it is located out in an industrial zone with nothing much to see around it. As I said, good if you are flying back early the following morning.

    3. Food - that important but thorny subject for all peregrinos. I have to say the quality was quite patchy. I hate to quibble about a meal that only costs €10 including wine or water but in some cases the food could really have been a lot better (see above). The standard of salads was generally pretty good but the main courses were not great. I will stick to mentioning where we had good to very good meals. The Hotel Dona Mayor in Fromista, La Cerverceria in Carrion de Los Condes, Los Templarios (mine was good my wife's ok - and we both had the same main course!), La Mary Leon where we had the pilgrim menu on Friday (very good for Leon at €10) and ate lunch there on Saturday off the a la carte menu and it was a delicious break from the peregrino menu. And finally CasaBlanca on the road from Manzilla de Las Mulas to Leon for breakfast). Fresh orange juice pretty well everywhere was lovely as were the cafe con leches (apart from a cafe directly opposite the cathedral in Leon where despite repeated requests we were served cold coffees).

    4. The Meseta itself. Having walked quite a bit of now I am sure I would have been very sorry to have missed it. For me it was far from boring and in fact quite varied. It wasn't by any means as flat as I had expected and there are many places with interesting views etc. I loved the little bodegas built into the hillsides. It was in its own way challenging replacing the climbs of Navarre and Rioja with long dusty roads. There is still plenty of stillness to be found along the alternative routes which I would recommend but be prepared to carry extra water and snacks.

    5. The people. Quite a few people on the Way last week. We met lots of really nice people from the US, Canada, France, Netherlands, Australia and even Ireland. We met a group of four from France who had started walking from Le Puy on the 8th of August - just imagine 800kms to get to St Jean and then another 800 to Santiago! We met one girl who had started walking from her home in the Netherlands. As always the people you meet are a big part of the experience. I will say that I noticed, maybe for the first time, how it might be difficult for people on their own as some of the groups we met seemed to be a bit self contained. I don't mean this a criticism but I can imagine that if you are travelling on your own and have not managed to join a "Camino family" or have lost touch with your Camino family it could be quite a lonely experience which would be quite a pity. We met one lovely couple from Columbia, South Carolina and the wife had injured her knee so was sending on her pack each day. She told us that one young peregrino had remarked negatively to her about "real pilgrims" carrying their own packs - some people eh !!!

    6. FOOTWEAR - and not wishing to start the boot debate again, I have to say the Merrell MOAB2 is a great shoe. As I think I said elsewhere my shoes I bought earlier this year for my March April Camino had started to come apart at the heel just two weeks before I left. This was disappointing as the shoes were otherwise in excellent condition. In fairness to both the shop and Merrel's they agreed to replace my MOABs with a new pairs of MOAB2s under warranty. So I left for this Camino with less than a week of walking on my shoes. What can I say. Pretty much out of the box they were comfortable. Only problem I encountered was due to my own mistake. I tied the top knot of the lace on my right shoe too tightly on the first day and bruised the bridge of my right foot. This led to some painful walking until I got the knotting right.

    I also have to give a big shout out to the Superwool socks. Some long days walking and some very hot ones too and my feet were perfectly comfortable. Only one hot spot on the 8 kms of the Roman Road from Calzada del Coto to Los Templarios - and that had been a long long day. They are a really great investment.

    AND FINALLY - we saw a WOLF. Yes I know it sounds incredible and I could hardly believe it myself. On our very first day walking, on the alternative route between Poblacion and Villalcazar de Sirga at 12.00pm - yes midday - we stopped to readjust our packs. We were speaking with a local lady who was looking for her dog. She left for home with her lab and we were just about to get started again when my wife spotted a large "dog" running along the ridge of a hill across the river. We thought at first glance it might be a large german shepherd but when it reemerged and walked down the hill towards us it was absolutely clearly a wolf. He/she then sat down in the field looking around. I couldn't get my phone camera working as quickly as I wanted so all I got was a blurry picture before a noisy group of fellow peregrinos (nationality withheld :) )
    frightened him/her off. An incredible first day on our Camino!

    Buen Camino

    Greg
     
  2. Crepes4Suzette

    Crepes4Suzette Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the great information, Greg! I'm noting your recommendations for next time and am so happy that you liked the Hotel Dona Mayor in Fromista and the Feria by Barajas. So glad you got to get some Camino walking in and that the trip was good.
     
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  3. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey Greg - What a GREAT report with excellent advice for the pilgrim. So many of your observations are those that I, too, found to be true.

    Five days is too short of a time to walk. We found our 12 days last spring equally short and after a rest day in Santiago would have loved to have kept walking. But, five days are five days and it sounds like you and your wife had a great experience.

    I, too, really enjoyed walking across the Meseta. It's too bad it gets the bad wrap from some as a section to skip by taking the bus across it. As you said, there is great variety and I'd hope folks yet to walk it enjoy it as much as we both did.

    Speaking of long slogs across the countryside, that 8 kms between Sahagun and Calzadilla can seem like a bit of an eternity, particularly in the heat, but I did enjoy the break from the Camino crowd on this less chosen alternate route. I, too, enjoyed sitting on the terrace of the Albergue Via Trajana enjoying a cold beverage and meeting some folks biking their way across the Meseta.

    I still marvel at those who think there are categories of pilgrims. Real pilgrims versus the rest of us suggests to me that they just don't get it! It's unfortunate, but a reality, that some folks put themselves above others! Argh! And, aren't the Camino families we become part of a very special part of the walk!

    Thanks so much for sharing! I trust you didn't sneak any of your gear into your wife's backpack and tell her that's how it was supposed to feel!

    Take care pilgrim.
     
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  4. Greg Canning

    Greg Canning Well-Known Member

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    Thank you both. No matter how short I've loved each and every one of my Camino experiences. Have to start planning the last sections hopefully for spring next year.

    As for sneaking my gear into my wife's pack........the very thought.... I'm not that brave:)

    But yes we had a marvelous time. I can't wait for a time when we will not have to do it in small chunks and losing the two travelling days each time is a pain. But there are some compensations in that we can afford to spend a little more on accommodation and it is a relatively short hop from here, so I have no complaints.
     
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  5. Galloglaigh

    Galloglaigh Member

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    Uncle Hammy came up with the same comment so perhaps we could try "adopt a peregrino" as you go along.
     
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  6. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    Excellent report Greg and one that I am sure that pilgrims following in your footsteps will find incredibly useful :)

    The nearest I saw to a wolf on my own Camino Frances was a statue commemorating the spot where a pilgrim had been eaten by one – I can’t remember where his was, but I am Pleased to hear that there won’t be another statue being built between Poblacion and Villalcazar de Sirga to commemorate a similar incident :)

    I am sure that you will be looking forwards to your next section and I look forwards to reading about it.

    Best Regards

    Rob
     
  7. Greg Canning

    Greg Canning Well-Known Member

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    Not sure we need to adopt anyone but be open to meet people. Some people are on their own at a particular moment in time because they want to be for all kinds of reasons but I agree we could all be more open to meeting others.
     
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  8. Greg Canning

    Greg Canning Well-Known Member

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    Thankfully Rob, I don't think he/she was too interested in us. We had passed quite a big herd of sheep a bit earlier and perhaps lamb chops were on her mind. I hope not because the herd was being watched by three big Spanish Mastiffs! Perhaps she/he was just looking for a drink in the river.

    I believe the wolf population is growing in Spain which would be great but hopefully it can be managed so that both wolf and farmers can maintain a decent living.

    Buen Camino

    Greg
     
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  9. UnkleHammy

    UnkleHammy Well-Known Member

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    In part 5. of your post, it seamed as though I had writen it. Thanks for the thought.
     
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  10. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

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    Totally agree Greg – I am from a farming background and also believe that we should be able to have a proper balance between farming and nature and here in my native Lakeland (UK) I think we do a reasonable job with this, the latest success we are having is a growing otter population :)

    However IF “Lamb chops” had been on the menu for your wolf, that does make things difficult – But with good will and perhaps a little compensation for the farmer, solutions that are fair can usually be found



    On another point that you raised in your post – The increasing difficulty in joining / making a Camino Family because of larger groups that aren’t open to interacting with others, and the awful comments that the lady with the injured knee received about not being a real Pilgrim because she wasn’t carrying her own pack.

    For what they are worth, my own views are



    The latter comment about what is, and what isn’t a real pilgrim is just down to small mindedness and should be dismissed with no time being wasted on debating the topic ;-)



    But the increasing difficulty in joining / making a Camino Family is, to me, far more worrying as the Biggest pleasure I had from all my Camino’s was the interaction with my fellow pilgrims, especially the fact that whether you are a surgeon or a street cleaner, you shared the same dormitory, bathroom and food – The Camino is a Wonderful Leveller where class, wealth, position, background and many other requirements of so called social standing are 100% superfluous

    And What a Huge Shame it would be if this interaction was lost :-(



    Oh Hum

    Rob
     
  11. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey Greg - Shoes have to fit the foot they're intended for, but I, too like the Merrell Moabs. Haven't seen the 2s yet, but the original one has worked very well for me. Are the 2s waterproof like the GTXs? I know you had to replace your old ones, so I'm glad they were comfortable right out of the box. Lots of good shoes available for the hiker. In fact, I find the Merrell website overwhelming due to the number of choices. Speaking of shoes, I've been wearing a different Merrell around casually, but it has the same design and similar soles as do my others. It's the Moab Rover Waterproof. It's more of an about town, everyday walking shoe, it'd also look very stylish in an Irish pub, but with the same features that the hiker has. Buen Camino!

    https://www.rei.com/product/872815/...0eNKssolUspO4CtYa9VWFvCrcu_MkbBRoCwEsQAvD_BwE
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2017
  12. Greg Canning

    Greg Canning Well-Known Member

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    Hi Rob and Wily

    I have to agree that meeting and exchanging our experiences with others from around the world is one of the great rewards of the Camino and that it would be a great pity if it were to be lost. I don't think it will happen but I was just commenting that I could see how hard it might be for someone on their own to "break" into well established Camino families, not always or through anyone's intentions but just that it could happen and maybe it's something we should all be aware of on our Caminos.

    In relation to Wily's question on the new Merrell Moab2s, I think you have a choice as to whether they are Goretex or Merrells propriety version of waterproofing. Mine are GTX but luckily I haven't had a chance to test them in that regard as yet.

    Buen Camino all

    Greg
     
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  13. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey Greg - As I walked at a different pace and often stopped at different locations than what Brierley recommended, I found my loose Camino family always changing. Over the course of 500 miles, I was probably associated with some three different groups of individuals. Those I ended up in Santiago with were all different from those I began the journey with. Getting to know folks and establishing relationships seemed to happen quite naturally so I didn't feel this "breaking into a group" was either an issue or a problem. As much as I enjoyed the evening company of familiar faces or even walking with acquaintances on different days, my sense of family was less concrete and much more fluid. There certainly were what I'd call groups or pilgrim families that I regularly saw together, but more common were all the individuals who seemed to gravitate towards one another to have a coffee or meal together and then go our own way in the morning with the idea that we might meet up again that night or down the road. I found that type of camaraderie to be both flexible and refreshing. Far from lonely, I think I met even more people that way than had I been attached to a family. But, as we have said, we all walk our own Camino. Take care.
     
  14. raymond john

    raymond john Well-Known Member

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    Hi Greg
    I loved walking the mesta, the rolling landscape was brilliant and it reminded of home. Earlier this year, I took a five day walk from Pamplona to Logrono with a friend using it as an introduction to the camino. We had a great time meeting and sharing with lots of pilgrims. We formed a camino family and all walked at our own pace, meeting up at regular stops for coffee / lunch. We did not pre book any Albergues just picked an Albergue from the Brierly guide book. Accept for our first night I wanted to stay at the Albergue Marilbel Roncal in Cizur Menor, she a wonderful lady who makes you feel very welcome, also has a free foot surgery for Pilgrims.
    I am a member of the CSJ ( Confraternity of St James) and a volunteer Hospitalero, I'm currently getting ready to return to Spain at the end of October, to close down our Albergue Gaucelmo in Rabanal de Camino for the winter. We provide B&B, afternoon tea in the garden, laundry & kitchen facilities with tea/ coffee, its by Donation only and on a first come basis ( No pre booking ). We have a Benedictine monastery next door and a 12th Century Templar church across the courtyard. The monks visit the Albergue to meet and talk with the pilgrims
    Working as a hospitalero is in many ways is like being a static pilgrim meeting, greeting and sharing with Pilgrims from all over the world. To witness the generosity of the pilgrims sharing and supporting each other is an amazing experience. They have some wonderful stories/ experiences to tell. My next tour of duty is the last 2 weeks in October 2018. However, I will be back at the end of March to reopen the Albergue and hopefully take another short camino from Logrono to Burgos.

    Carpe Diem & Ultreya

    Raymond John
     
  15. Greg Canning

    Greg Canning Well-Known Member

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    Hi Raymond John

    I was going to say that the section between Pamplona and Logrono is one of my favourites but then so is the section between St Jean and Pamplona and from Logrono to Fromista etc etc and yes I loved the rolling hills of the Meseta and the little "hobbit house" like bodegas built into the furry hills. So what I've realised is that for many different reasons each part is worth doing.

    I hope to get back early next year too to try to walk from Leon as far as Sarria at least so I will get the chances to visit Rabanal del Camino which sounds really interesting to visit. I love visiting the Templar sites.

    The work of the hospitalero seems and sounds both challenging and rewarding.

    Buen Camino

    Greg
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2017
  16. raymond john

    raymond john Well-Known Member

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    Hi Gerg.
    I agree with your comment that every part of the camino is worth doing, with each bringing its own unique experience and every time you walk the camino from wherever you start and finish, is not by accident it has meaning and purpose. Remember the camino provides in ways you can never imagine and is full of surprises . The one thing that I have realised is that it's when on the camino we are all walking in the same direction to Santiago Compostela, where our destiny awaits us.

    Capre Diem & Ultreya

    Raymond John
     
  17. Greg Canning

    Greg Canning Well-Known Member

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    "when on the camino we are all walking in the same direction to Santiago de Compostela, where our destiny awaits us. "

    I love it - perfect description of the Camino.
     
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  18. Jose

    Jose Active Member

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    Right now I am in Ledigos in the fantastic albergue La Morena. Talk about nice. I opted for a private room as I have come down with a bit of cold and am coughing some. This has been fantastic. My body is very clear on what it can do and only does unwillinging. I have had 3 30 KM days and they are simply too much. 20 something is just fine. So I stopped here and am glad I did..great bar and restaurant part of the Albergue. I am alone and it is not easy to penetrate groups. I am OK with this. I am met some people whose friendships I value deeply. All of them Scandinavian! What might that mean? For me the meseta is hard. Straight roads, level going on forever and ever and the afternoon sun is brutal. It is very cold in the morning, but by 12 or early you are taking off anything you can! As far as connecting with people, I think I will connect with the people I am meant to connect with. Also I treasure the solitude of walking along. And on this stretch working hard on saying to myself that right here, right now is where I want to be, not up there along the long road, but just right here. Living with the small delights along the white road, little corn flowers open screaming look at me I am totally open without holding back, others filmy purple a little confused at being in such a harsh environment. I am doing a little forward planning as in really being aware of not getting into a situation with too many KMs, but thwarting my planning tendency and not making reservations and so far haven´t been turned away anywhere. I don´t think I will ever reach Leon. God bless my Hoka shoes. I clean them up at night and honor them. No blisters and this is now around 400 KMs from Saint Jean. Ultreia
     
  19. Galloglaigh

    Galloglaigh Member

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    Those long straight roads can be difficult without company as it seems endless so hope you find some like minded travelling companions if only to help the km's pass.

    Keep us updated - you're past half way.
     
  20. Jose

    Jose Active Member

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    You are right. Company does help. But I tell you what, I feel in these long, long stretches that I have to come to terms with myself more than when I can be distracted by a new vista around a curve, some village revealing itself. In those long sun blasted, white road stretches I have to deal with my impatience, my need to look too far ahead and not notice the tiny pieces of existence around me. Also, today I got a taste of what it is like to take steps that bless the earth under me and that receive back the blessing of the earth. Might sound a little strange, but that was with me all today. And despite all of that it was a bit too long!
     
  21. Crepes4Suzette

    Crepes4Suzette Well-Known Member

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    Your posts are very touching, and your gratitude about it all really comes across, Jose. I think that doing 30K might have killed me:eek:. Did you like Carrion de Los Condes, and did you find a good place to stay? Five days to Leon, and then it gets even more interesting (in a good way).
     
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  22. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey Jose - Insightful, refreshing, and honest comments about your journey! At this point, I'm guessing that at roughly the halfway point in your Camino that it is the experience that you had hoped it would be. I'm sure you're well aware by now that the realities of the long stretches across the Meseta or how people do or do not connect with others can't really be captured by Hollywood or in a book (although I think the new Gabarain book comes pretty close). What your comments point to is that it's a very individual journey not always presenting what one may have had in mind before starting out. You still have some wonderful land yet to travel with more insights to come. Thanks so much for your heartfelt sharing. Buen Camino amigo.
     
  23. raymond john

    raymond john Well-Known Member

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    Jose
    I cannot add to what has already be said. However, you may not realise it at the moment, but you are not walking alone and that all you have experienced, has purpose and meaning. I felt a strong sense to share this Poem Footsteps in the Sand with you.

    One night I dreamed a dream.
    As I was walking along the beach with my Lord.
    Across the dark sky flashed scenes from my life.
    For each scene, I noticed two sets of footprints in the sand,
    One belonging to me and one to my Lord.

    After the last scene of my life flashed before me,
    I looked back at the footprints in the sand.
    I noticed that at many times along the path of my life,
    especially at the very lowest and saddest times,
    there was only one set of footprints.

    This really troubled me, so I asked the Lord about it.
    "Lord, you said once I decided to follow you,
    You'd walk with me all the way.
    But I noticed that during the saddest and most troublesome times of my life,
    there was only one set of footprints.
    I don't understand why, when I needed You the most, You would leave me."

    He whispered, "My precious child, I love you and will never leave you
    Never, ever, during your trials and testings.
    When you saw only one set of footprints,
    It was then that I carried you."

    From Leon take the scenic route to Villar de Mazarife and at stay at the Albergue Antonino de Padua, its excellent with good facilities, the evening meal and breakfast were 1st class. The stork nests on the village Casa's and the huge vegetables in the gardens. Wow !!!!!

    I would recommend staying at the CSJ Albergue Gaucelmo at Rabanal de Camino (20km from Astorga). Run by the Confraternity of St James a London based charity to promote the camino, You will receive a warm welcome and they offer B&B , laundry & Cooking facilities, tea/ coffee, afternoon tea in the garden. No pre booking, operates a 1st come 1st service, and its by Donation Only. There is a Monastery next door with a 12th Century Templar church across the courtyard. The monks occasionally visit the Alberuge to listen å talk with the Pilgrims
    Remember you are not alone and walk with courage, your destiny awaits you in Santiago

    Carpe Diem

    Raymond John
     
  24. Greg Canning

    Greg Canning Well-Known Member

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    Hey Jose

    Sounds like you are doing just great. That's some distance covered already. I loved those little cornflowers sticking up all along the roman road. It seemed like a quiet defiance against the heat and the stones.

    I hope your Camino continues to provide the experience and insights you seek.

    Buen Camino

    Greg


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    Last edited: Oct 9, 2017
  25. Wily

    Wily Camino Francés 2016; Camino Portugués 2017

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    Hey Raymond John - Wonderful poem! From all the great things that you've said about the albergue in Rabanal, I'm sorry that I missed it. My plans that day, as Rabanal was only 20 km from Astorga, was to hike a bit farther. So, after a bit of refreshment in Rabanal, I headed on another 5 km to Foncebadón. I only mention this as a option to pilgrims not quite ready to stop when they reach Rabanal.

    Foncebadón is one of those places that seems almost passed over by the passage of time. Old stone houses dominate this small hamlet many in disrepair. This is also one of those places that would no longer exist if it weren't for the Camino passing through it. However, for the pilgrim, there are a couple good albergues with very decent food available. I stayed in the very modern Convento de Foncebadón that offered one of the best garlic soups that I had along the Camino. Sitting with friends on the porch of the Monte Irago that afternoon enjoying a cold beer, we had the best seat in town to watch pilgrims pass by. As it is all uphill from Rabanal to Foncebadón, I got that climb out of the way and found myself just 2 km shy of the Cruz de Ferro. An short, easy hike in the morning put me there before sunrise. Buen Camino!

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  26. Jose

    Jose Active Member

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    Thank you so much for your good words!!
     
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  27. Jose

    Jose Active Member

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    Thanks, Greg. Let´s just say I am a little overwhelmed with all of it right now. All most more than I have room for.
     
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  28. Jose

    Jose Active Member

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    Thanks so much Crepes4 Suzette! I liked Carrion de los Condes very much. I had a sort of rest day there. A guy met me out on the path entering the town and handed me a flyer for the Hostal Carrion de los Condes...I think that was the name. It is right on the main plaza. I had come down with a cold and needed some privacy to sniff and cough and get well. So, I took it as a sign and stayed there and it was perfectly fine. The most amazing was however La Morena in Lèdigos. I got a private room and it was really, really nice. The whole place is super in a next to not existent village. Now just 2 more days to Leon. Made it to Reliegos today.
     
  29. Greg Canning

    Greg Canning Well-Known Member

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    Jose

    You do seem to be doing the right thing and listening to your body and taking breaks when you need them. It is so important not to get caught up in a race either physical or psychological. Continue to take time to stop and see and breathe.

    I have to say I too found those 30+km days to be really challenging and somewhere in the early 20s as being about right. If you can do it, getting on the road around dawn really helps with avoiding the afternoon sun.

    We finished our latest leg in Leon and I've added it to my "favourite cities" list :) so I hope you really enjoy it.

    Buen Camino

    Greg
     
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  30. Crepes4Suzette

    Crepes4Suzette Well-Known Member

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    Jose, thank you for sharing your Camino with us, and please keep us informed as you move along if you have the energy and inclination. Seems so many of us get sick on Camino - probably from all the close quarters and volume of people. I hope you're feeling better and am glad you're taking a little break to rest as needed.
     
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