1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Start The Walk In Barcelona Beginning Of March

Discussion in 'Traveling to and from the Camino' started by sanja, Feb 1, 2017.

  1. sanja

    sanja New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2017
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hello everyone,
    I am a very beginner with forums and the Camino. So to introduce my self shortly I am 28yo Macedonian girl and I leave in Amsterdam since 2010. I am fairly sportive person, i love to go for long walks, cycling and I do yoga almost everyday.
    At the moment I have a 3 months break from work and therefore I decided to try out some things I haven't before.
    I have just booked a ticket to go to Barcelona (first time) on the 3rd of March and would like to than walk the' Camino for about 2 weeks... I don't HAVE TO arrive to Santiago.
    As I just came back from Argentina I am very much longing for some nature / scenic walk. Would you recommend to walk the Camino from Barcelona?
    And is it smart to look for accommodation in each city or do i have to prebook ?

    I hope to hear from someone soon

    Thank you in advance for your time.
    Sanja
     
    UnkleHammy and Crepes4Suzette like this.
  2. Crepes4Suzette

    Crepes4Suzette Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2016
    Messages:
    460
    Likes Received:
    1,111
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Hi, Sanja! I do yoga 3X/week too - it helps to live with strength and flexibility, right? How nice to have a 3 month break! There is much to say, but first it would be good to understand if you want the experience of hiking among others to get that part of the experience or whether it's really mostly about being out in natural beauty. If you're already going to Barcelona to have a look around, and want to experience what people often do for their first experience, take the frequent & fast AVE train from Barcelona Sants to Madrid Puerta de Atocha, then get the ALVIA from Madrid to Pamplona. Although the mountain route won't be open in March, you might consider going back at another time and hiking that part next time you go. There is a CONDA.es bus once a day from Pamplona that time of year (twice a day later in the ther) that goes from Pamplona to Roncesvalles and then on to St. Jean Pied de Port. There is a lower route you can take in March, but you would miss the spectacular day over the Pyrenees. St. Jean Pied de Port is a traditional starting point and will give to a start that you won't forget - among other excited people - but maybe not in March. People here will have other ideas. Pamplona is also a good place to start. I think on the route from Monserrat, you'll find few other hikers and maybe far fewer lodging and food options, but it depends on what you want out of the experience (I haven't done that leg). Happy planning!
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2017
    UnkleHammy, Greg Canning and Wily like this.
  3. Wily

    Wily Francés 2016; Portugués 2017; Inglés/Fisterra 2018

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2016
    Messages:
    1,829
    Likes Received:
    3,595
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Upstate New York
    Hey Sanja - I'm going with Suzette here and recommending, as well, that Pamplona is a good starting point. Normally, I'd suggest SJPP as the traditionsl starting point, but seeing that you are walking in very early March, I'm going to suggest you skip the Pyrenees. If it were later in the spring, the hike on the Napoleon Route (which isn't open until later) from SJPP to Roncesvalles is magnificant! With that said, I think you'd be happy walking across Navarra from Pamplona. In two weeks, you could easily reach Burgos another great city in northern Spain. In fact, you can get to Burgos in about nine days so you either take it slower or walk on a bit further. This section of the Camino Francés is really quite nice and one most pilgrims enjoy very much. Regardless of the route you take, I'm sure you'll enjoy your time on the Camino.
     
  4. sanja

    sanja New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2017
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hey thank you for replaying so quick.
    Yes Yoga had quit an Impact on me in many aspekts of my life.
    About what I want out of this trip, I'm not sure, i just know that beautiful nature can only help. As I said I hven't done this before so I want to try it out, see if it is something for me...Therefore I wouldn't mind meeting people on the way but I just don't want to end up feeling like I am in a big touristy group.
    So I think the Pamplona could be a good Starting Point.
    What can you tell me about acomodation in this section? Can I just book a place to stay as I arrive somewhere or do I have to arrange this beforehand?
    Do I need to get a special map or?
    Sorry maybe my questions are naive but as a biginer I better ask that regret.
    Namaste :)
     
    UnkleHammy and Crepes4Suzette like this.
  5. Wily

    Wily Francés 2016; Portugués 2017; Inglés/Fisterra 2018

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2016
    Messages:
    1,829
    Likes Received:
    3,595
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Upstate New York
    Hey Sanja - With regard to accomodations and daily maps, check out the website gronze.com. One of the things that I like about gronze is that it identifies many of the accomodations along The Way. You can pull up the Camino by stage and see the route map and then the various albergues, hostels, and hotels. Many have links to more information and those associated with booking.com have a reservation link. As you will be traveling in very early March, I don't think you'll need to worry much about making reservations. It will still be a pretty quiet time on the Camino Francés which will make finding accomodations easier. If I were to make any reservations, depending on your arrival time, Pamplona would be the only place you might want to book ahead so you know where you're staying when you arrive. Let me recommend the Albergue Plaza Catedral just steps off the Camino next to the Cathedral. It's one if the albergues you can find in Gronze.com under the Pamplona section. I believe you can also get your pilgrim's credential there at the cathedral which you will need to use the albergues.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2017
    UnkleHammy and Crepes4Suzette like this.
  6. sanja

    sanja New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2017
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3

    Dear Wily,

    Thnk you so much for the reaction it is good to know that the walk to Burgos is only 9 days so if I am doing fine After 9 days I can go on.
    Such a pitty that my timing is Not Good for the Pyrenees, but i guess this won't be my first and last time doing This.
    Any tips on accomodation and maps
     
    UnkleHammy and Crepes4Suzette like this.
  7. Wily

    Wily Francés 2016; Portugués 2017; Inglés/Fisterra 2018

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2016
    Messages:
    1,829
    Likes Received:
    3,595
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Upstate New York
    Hey Sanja - There are a lot of great albergues in this section of the Camino. My preference was to stay in the private ones rather than in the municipales. Because I walked in May, a busier time of year, I wanted to have beds reserved and I was willing to pay a few more Euros to have that. But still, my average bed only cost 10€ which was well with my planned budget. Just as a starting point for your planning, let me share with you where I stayed in this stretch of the Camino.

    Pamplona - Albergue Plaza Catedral
    Puente la Reina - Albergue Jakue
    Villatuerta - La Casa Mágica
    Los Arcos - Casa Abuela
    Logroño - Albergue Santiago Apóstol
    Nájera - Albergue Puerta de Nájera
    Santo Domingo - Casa de la Cofradía Santo
    Belorado - Cuatro Cantones
    Agés - Albergue El Pajar
    Burgos - La Divina Pastora

    I would stay at any of these on my next Camino. However, on Gronze.com, there are even more listed for you to choose from. I'm sure others will have further recommendations for you. Buen Camino!
     
    UnkleHammy and Crepes4Suzette like this.
  8. Crepes4Suzette

    Crepes4Suzette Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2016
    Messages:
    460
    Likes Received:
    1,111
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Pennsylvania, USA
    I think I understand your goals better. It's not only for hardcore trekkers such as perhaps the Annapurna Circuit or the Appalachian Trail are, but I think you'll find a fairly hardy and good-natured bunch of people from all corners of the world, which to me is a great part of the enjoyment. That's not to say there aren't annoying people out there too - but it's usually possible to say a "Buen Camino" in passing and not engage with them. It's also not quite as isolated a hike, and food and lodging is well-supported on several of the more popular Camino routes. There is natural beauty a-plenty, so you will get that. Many people think hiking it straight through without any bus-aheads is the way to go, but there were stretches that I skipped the second Camino because they were just tedious and unnecessary and I didn't want to waste time. I also went alone - my husband's traveling days are over - and felt better about at least here and there being among others.

    The accommodation answer will probably have something to do with the month you go. If you go directly from your March time in Barcelona, you will have many options in Pamplona - some of the pilgrim accommodation is closed in the dead of winter, but I think you would be fine early in the year until about mid-May. There are choices of all kinds in Pamplona. I bused in from Madrid and then bused out the next day to St. Jean Pied de Port and stayed at Nostal Navarra by the beautiful, stylish chrome-and-glass bus station in Pamplona the first time, but if you want to be among others, that's probably not the best choice. I get tired of the albergues after a couple of ights, and so seek out pensions/B&B's/habitacions/casa rurales/hotels intermittently. Those alternatives to municipal albergues (which DON'T take reservations) are often bookable with a brief phone call, booking on their sites, or booking via Booking.com. There are lots of resources to find these options such as the onlilne pdf's of all the albergues, looking on Wise Pilgrim.com, or - maybe best to find location and non-albergue options - just google a map of the town or stretch and enter "lodging" or something like that. They come up with the location on a map, and often also the price. The very best to you! Namaste, Sanja!
     
    Greg Canning and UnkleHammy like this.
  9. sanja

    sanja New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2017
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hey Thank You very much for the advices, it. meins a Lot.
    I have One More Question, the Signa alone the Way...are they close to eachother? Do i have to have a Map or i can relay on Signs only?
     
    Crepes4Suzette likes this.
  10. Wily

    Wily Francés 2016; Portugués 2017; Inglés/Fisterra 2018

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2016
    Messages:
    1,829
    Likes Received:
    3,595
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Upstate New York
    Hey Sanja - The Camino Francés is well marked! Between the yellow arrows and the shell markers, you won't have any difficulty finding your way. Of course, cities do offer their challenges due to all the other distractions around. Nonetheless, on any given day, many other pilgrims will be following the same path you are. Occasionally, one takes a wrong turn, but that's usually quickly corrected. Still, maps are handy! All I carried with me was the Brierley book complete with maps and route information which I'm glad I had as a reference. You'll find Your Way just fine. Buen Camino!
     
  11. BROWNCOUNTYBOB

    BROWNCOUNTYBOB Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2012
    Messages:
    518
    Likes Received:
    839
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Anyone passing through Barcelona in the next few days, please be advised of the following security alert:

    Spain: Barcelona: Taxi drivers to strike on 16 March; allow extra time for travel

    Members may encounter travel disruption in central Barcelona (Catalonia autonomous community) on 16 March during a strike by taxi drivers from 08.00 to 20.00 (local time). A related demonstration is planned from 10.00 from the Arc de Triomf via the regional parliament to Placa Sant Jaume (see map). Unionised taxi drivers are protesting a law allowing smartphone taxi applications to operate in the city, which they regard as unfair competition. During a related protest in January, several hundred taxi drivers slowed traffic on the city's ring roads for four hours; similar actions are possible on 16 March.
     
    UnkleHammy and Crepes4Suzette like this.
Loading...

Share This Page