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Tendonitis Avoidance

Discussion in 'Camino Frances' started by Silktea3, Apr 5, 2014.

  1. Silktea3

    Silktea3 New Member

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    I have read so many devastating stories from people who developed tendonitis and either lost a few days walking or had to quit altogether.

    In researching ways to avoid this nasty problem, I see where it is stressed to do a proper warm up before beginning. The other thing was to avoid prolonged activity that causes it. I can do the warm up for sure. But I have to walk for a prolonged time. Are there other things that can be done to avoid tendonitis before it starts? Does taking an anti-inflammatory medication before starting help? How about frequent rest stops and good hydration? Walking sticks? Is ice available for ice packs ? Anything else one can do? Thank you in advance!
     
  2. slow walker

    slow walker New Member

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    Hi Silktea,
    I have been this soldier and it is not a pretty place to be. Best advice I can give is to go to a good store selling walking gear and having experienced staff. We are blessed to have one, or two in Dublin with the level of expertise that gives confidence when you are undecided. (The Great Outdoors and 53 Degrees North-not an advert, but a recommendation for undecided in Dublin). I would recommend having your feet measured and proper insoles fitted. Standard insoles in boots are useless and will cause you great pain on long continuous walking. I have used Surefoot insoles from Great Outdoors and elasticated ankle bandages from Boots Chemists and never had a problem in the many thousands of miles I have walked since then. I would recommend using sticks as an aid to cut down on daily pounding. Frequent rest stops are a norm on the Camino. No one walks without an infusion of strong coffee inside your jumper. As regards ice, you will get all you want until mid May-after that, it goes in the gin and tonics.
    I hope you enjoy this, your first of many Caminos
    Sean,
    Dublin
     
  3. Silktea3

    Silktea3 New Member

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    I have my shoes which I've walked miles with not one problem with blisters or hot spots. Insoles on my Keenes are great. Elasticated ankle bandages .... Hmmm I wonder if that is like our ACE wrap bandages. The ice will come out of the gin and tonic after a few minutes for ice packs. Ice will be our friend on this journey. Gin and tonic our second friend ... Second BEST friend!
     
  4. Regina38

    Regina38 New Member

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    I think that sneakers with high tops would help to protect you from turning your ankles. When I turned on mine, the floors between one room and another were about 1 1/2 or 2 inches different in height. I only see from one eye so I don't have depth perception - a serious contributing factor. Also, my injuries (it happened on both feet at different times) occurred not when I was on the trail, but in the evening when I was wearing sandals. The sandals had wide heels and were about 1 1/2 inches high. There are plenty od farmacias along the Camino and I'd recommend you buy a tube of arnica gel if you need it. It helps with soreness.
    I saw more people with knees taped up than those suffering from tendinitis. Hope this helps. Buen Camino.
     
  5. Dutch

    Dutch Member

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    My name is Dutch, so...guess :)
    I was one of those people your talking about. Awfull, but with rest, i did make it to SdC. Rest and medicine.
    I got diclofenac at the farmacia, on docters advice. A 50mg anti-inflammatory drug. Diclofenac is stronger then ibuprofen, but also a NSAID medication.
    This, together with rest (a must) helped me. Not just the rest and not just the pills. The combination.
    Taking any drug as prevention is useless and not advisable. Also keeping on walking on painkillers will eventually catch with you. Maybe in 2 days, maybe in a week, but it will.
    Diclofenac you can get without docters prescription at a farmacia, i think up to 50mg pills, i.e. Voltaren 50mg comprimidos gastrorresistentes, Diclofenaco sódico. Any stronger, i believe you need a docters note in Spain.
    Here in Holland you already need a doctors note from 25mg, so it kind off says something about how heavy this stuff is, so do not take this lightly. Eventhough 50mg is an over the counter drug in Spain, i did not get and use it without proper docters advice. I would surely not advice anything different.

    I am going to tell you to forget all about all the wonderfull allknowing shoe advise you are getting here, from friends, from the pro-shop ect and tell you to walk in the shoes that you feel most comfortable with. If it is a running shoe or a walking/hiking boot, it does not matter. If it is not "your" shoe, forget about it. To me, this is the main thing you can do to prevent missery.

    I listened to people who knew and took their pro advice and i ended up with a world of hurt because of stiff boots (with insoles) that just weren't me. I should have just walked in nice comfy running shoes, 'cause that is "my" shoe.
    Halfway thru my camino, after my much needed rest, i bought running shoes and every step from that day on was like heaven on earth. It felt like coming home for my feet.
    so please, all the good intended advice aside, just walk on what is right for you. Your feet are not my feet, are not the salesmans feet, are not a forum members feet. Only you know what is right for you.

    Other things that might help you prevent problems:
    Be carefull with long 30+ days. Especially when planning to walk these distances day after day after day.
    Take a break now and then.
    yes, water. Very important. For your whole body.



    I also now know that physical fitness has absolutely nothing to do with preventing these sorts of problems. I am very fit and had severe problems. People around me, not even close to my fitness level, had no problems at all, yet they walked the same distances i did, except maybe a slower pace.
    Go figure...

    I think you either get it, or you don't. Lucky for you the odds are highly in favour of NOT getting it ;-) so don't worry about it. Shoes, lots of coffee stops and water and you'll be fine.

    Buen camino.
     
  6. Leslie

    Leslie Administrator

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    I really think walking speed has a lot to do with it. I walked too fast at the start and used to come across the same French guy for a few days. He kept telling me to slow down, (might also have been talking about my head). Eventually I listened and took that advice and my body thanked me by being less stiff and painful each day.

    And in general I agree with your shoe advice. I like walking shoes, my other likes her boots. However on the Le Puy route I would have been much better with boot as the surface requires them - it is not like the Camino Frances.
     
  7. Dutch

    Dutch Member

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    My name is Dutch, so...guess :)
    True, i also think speed is an important factor. Eventhough my (fast) speed is the pace i like, it just wasn't the pace i should have walked, at least not in the wrong shoes. After the needed rest i slowed down. This also was fine, but the very last day into SdC i walked just as the way i started my trip, alone and in my quick pace.

    In 4 weeks i am starting the camino portugees, in my beloved running shoes. Speed? To be determined:)
     
  8. Elizabeth2014

    Elizabeth2014 Member

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    Dutch, and Leslie: Thank you for these comments. I start next week and have been a bit worried about my fitness levels. But reading your comments I feel relieved. I do have the right footwear (hiking boots for me) and will just take my time. Buen Camino.
     
  9. Lightshaman

    Lightshaman New Member

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    Hi there,

    Good information from Lesley and Dutch.

    Personally I prefer good walking boots but whatever footwear you choose must fit well and be well and truly worn in prior to starting your journey.
    Apart from that the best advice is to take your time and don't push things too hard, especially on the first few days. Remember it's a pilgrimage not a race. Take your time to enjoy the scenery and learn about yourself as you walk.

    I was interested to see that you can get diclofenic without perscription in Spain. I used it previously when I twisted my back and found it to be of great help.

    Happy walking
     

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