1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Things I Wish I Had Brought On The Camino And Things I Wish I Hadn't

Discussion in 'What equipment should you use and take' started by JFK, Jun 29, 2015.

  1. JFK

    JFK Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2015
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    California
    My list is based on a Spring (mid-April to late May) camino:

    Things I wish I had brought:
    1. Big D-ring to hang my backpack on the bunkbeds
    2. 3 or 4 zip ties
    3. A few more ziplock bags
    4. pillow case

    Things that I brought but did not need:
    1. Travel clothesline
    2. Large flashlight
    3. Silk long johns

    Things I brought and was very glad I did:
    1. Walking sticks--absolutely essential
    2. Sleeping bag
    3. Ziplock bags
    4. Two hats--one lightweight ski hat and one sun hat
    5. A bandana or handkerchief
    6. Ibuprofen
    7. Wool socks and quick dry clothing
    8. A very good rain jacket
    9. A small swiss army knife and small scissors
    10. A good lightweight jacket
    11. Fleece pullover
    12. Lightweight gloves

    Anyone else that can add some thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2015
  2. LisaB

    LisaB Donating Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2015
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Can I ask please what you would have liked to put in the ziplock bags? I'm still considering what to pack myself. Also, what is a zip tie? not sure what that means.
     
    JFK likes this.
  3. JFK

    JFK Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2015
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    California
    Ziplocks are great for many things including:
    1. Your passport, cash, credit/debit, pilgrim credential and personal notebook. Keeps them dry and secure without having to carry a big wallet. You always want to carry your passport and cash on your person and the ziplock is a great way to do this.

    2. As a way to organize, separate and compress your clothing before putting it in your backpack. I kept my socks, underwear, and t-shirts in separate ziplock bags. Helps you keep organized for easy packing and departure from the albergues. Compressing your jacket (if you carry one) and other clothing can keep your backpack slimmer too.

    3. Keeps your clothing dry if the rain really gets bad.

    Zip ties, or cable ties, are one-use plastic cable that can tie things together. For example--A metal fastener holding my backpack chest strap together broke and a ziptie would have been a perfect replacement part. They are very light and might come in handy.

    See the below website for a better explanation.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cable_tie

    Hope this helps!
     
    fitzcarraldo and LisaB like this.
  4. danvo

    danvo Super Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2014
    Messages:
    648
    Likes Received:
    599
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Bratislava, Slovakia
    @JFK "but did not need" ...I prefer headlamp more than large flashlight.
    Ibuprofen is fine, I recommend Voltaren capsules too.
     
    fitzcarraldo and JFK like this.
  5. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    Messages:
    971
    Likes Received:
    1,071
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Cumbria UK
    Home Page:
    Hi JFK

    You said

    “Anyone else that can add some thoughts?”



    My own Two “Essentials” would be

    1) A well broken in pair of lightweight “Gortex” type fabric boots with a proven sock combination – Unhappy Feet Always lead to Unhappy Peregrino’s so this is something I believe is worth taking both time and effort to get right. My own preferences for socks are thin seamless liners with quality outers – But different combinations work for different people so it is trial and error until you work out your own perfect combination ;-)

    2) Rucksack Protector – Primarily to help ensure that your rucksack arrives at your starting point in one piece (Airlines are notorious for damaging rucksacks because, with all the straps they are vulnerable to getting caught on airport carousels) They are also useful for securing rucksacks if you are using a baggage transfer service and some act as a water resistant liner for your rucksack when walking, so an additional barrier to help keep your kit dry

    I also agree with above about a head-torch, I always take an LED version as these are very light and have a battery life of about 120 hours

    Finally – Don’t forget your camera – My preference is a small quality point and shoot and this lives in a pouch on my rucksack waistband so that it is easily and quickly accessible as I like to try and capture as many of those special Camino moments as I can

    Good Luck and Buen Camino to All

    Rob
     
  6. anniem

    anniem Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2015
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    139
    Trophy Points:
    43

    Do I really need a head torch? Is the phone torch (flashlight) not sufficient? Thanks
     
  7. JFK

    JFK Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2015
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    California
    Anniem,

    I used a very small handheld LED (key-chain sized) torch, not a head torch. That was sufficient for me. Your phone torch will be sufficient too. I saw many pilgrims using their phone to light up the surroundings in the Albergues.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2015
  8. danvo

    danvo Super Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2014
    Messages:
    648
    Likes Received:
    599
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Bratislava, Slovakia
    @anniem - this is about your walking preferences. If you want to start very soon morning, head torch is fine, because it has more power light. I walked in june/july and sometimes started ca 6:30AM, so it was quite dark out. Of course, head torch lasts much longer.
    Btw - i think there is good idea to start very soon morning, mainly in the summer ( soon mean 6AM :) )
     
  9. anniem

    anniem Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2015
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    139
    Trophy Points:
    43
    thanks JFK that's good enough for me.
     
    JFK likes this.
  10. anniem

    anniem Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2015
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    139
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Danvo, I am starting in Sept and and have no wish to be first up walking but thank you for you reply. A
     
    JFK likes this.
  11. danvo

    danvo Super Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2014
    Messages:
    648
    Likes Received:
    599
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Bratislava, Slovakia
    Annie, Buen Camino! :)
     
    JFK likes this.
  12. anniem

    anniem Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2015
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    139
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Danvo, nothing to do with the Camino but I have been to Bratislava, indeed I took a Segway tour and fell off!!
     
    Woodchild likes this.
  13. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    Messages:
    971
    Likes Received:
    1,071
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Cumbria UK
    Home Page:
    It all comes down to personal preference – I prefer a head torch, mainly because I have both hands free when using it, the one I have is very light and the batteries last a Long Time – But I could also use my phone, however this is an old simple one and would increase the demand on the battery, which isn’t that great in the first place.


    Just take what you think and if it isn’t working out, you always have the option of buying something better en-route

    Good Luck and Buen Camino

    Rob
     
    danvo and JFK like this.
  14. stevelm1

    stevelm1 The Happy Peregrino Donating Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2014
    Messages:
    265
    Likes Received:
    174
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Arlington, WA, USA
    Home Page:
    Any recommendations on a "light" head lamp? The one I have is not that heavy but the batteries and especially the charger are.
     
  15. RJS

    RJS Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    Messages:
    971
    Likes Received:
    1,071
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Cumbria UK
    Home Page:



    My own head torch is a Black Diamond with 4 LED’s and operated by 3 x AAA batteries – It is quite an old model and looks as though it has been superseded with something like

    http://blackdiamondequipment.com/en/headlamps-and-lanterns/spot-BD620612FREDALL1.html

    Best Regards

    Rob
     
    JFK and stevelm1 like this.
  16. stevelm1

    stevelm1 The Happy Peregrino Donating Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2014
    Messages:
    265
    Likes Received:
    174
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Arlington, WA, USA
    Home Page:
    RJS, thanks for the hint.
     
    RJS likes this.
  17. stevelm1

    stevelm1 The Happy Peregrino Donating Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2014
    Messages:
    265
    Likes Received:
    174
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Arlington, WA, USA
    Home Page:
    As far as having something to carry your gear in while you travel. I bought a cheap duffle bag (aprox $40) with wheels that holds my pack, boots and polls. I plan to use it to get to St Jean and then just leave it there. When I get to Santiago I will buy another to go home with. Perhaps an expensive solution but one that I think will deal with the problem of getting your gear to the trail in one piece. I guess I could send the duffle ahead, but I plan to take my time on the trail and have no idea when I will get to Santiago, all I know for sure is it will take more than an month. Plus postage on a large bag like that may be more than a new bag.
     
    JFK likes this.
  18. Sten-Åke Granberg

    Sten-Åke Granberg New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2015
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    If you want a LED lamp use one with relight. Iy does not disturb the ones who sleep!
     
    JFK likes this.
  19. Sten-Åke Granberg

    Sten-Åke Granberg New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2015
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Of Course Red Light nothing else!
     
  20. dt93103

    dt93103 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2015
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, CA
    REI makes a pack duffle that folds up into a case for $29.50. You can carry it along and use it to fly home.
     
    JFK likes this.
  21. stevelm1

    stevelm1 The Happy Peregrino Donating Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2014
    Messages:
    265
    Likes Received:
    174
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Arlington, WA, USA
    Home Page:
    I checked out the REI duffles and the one large enough to hold all my stuff weighed about two pounds (but did fold down to a very compact size. That was two pounds of dead useless weight that I did not want to carry, when I can replace the bag for $40 bucks or so. Plus someone in St Jean will need that bag I am dropping off there to get home (maybe).
     
    fitzcarraldo likes this.
  22. Tom V

    Tom V Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2015
    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    57
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I had a rain cover for my pack and used it 6 or more times to keep everything dry. I never left in the morning without Compeed. Bandaids and an anaseptic cream along with needle and thread for blister treatment are musts. Ibuprofen in Spain is 600 mg so don't take too many if you're hurting. Sun screen.
     
    JFK likes this.
  23. dt93103

    dt93103 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2015
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, CA
    You're right, 2 pounds is way too much to carry!
     
    fitzcarraldo likes this.
  24. JFK

    JFK Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2015
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    California
    Good call on the rain cover. How could I forget?? Thanks.
     
  25. mtman100

    mtman100 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2014
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    3
    I started in SJPDP on 17 June and will be in Astorga tomorrow. What you pack depends largely on the time of y5. It hasn't rained a single drop on us. I took too many clothes. I personally think a fleece is crazy for the summer. Have an ultra light nylon vented long sleeve shirt, long sleeve silk base layer and 3 high tech short sleeve shirts, one pair of zip off ultra lite pants and a an almost nothing weighing pair of running shorts, yet I have too much. A fleece would weigh as much as half of my cloths. I never got cold. I would cut the amount in half for a Summer Camino.....2 shorts, 2 pr socks, 2pr liners, 2 underwear 2 shirts, one silks long sleeve base and one sun hat.
     
    Woodchild likes this.
  26. JFK

    JFK Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2015
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    California
    I completely agree. Everyone has their own Camino. If the original Pilgrims could have taken a bus, they would have. ;)
     
    Woodchild and jodles64 like this.
  27. patsykate

    patsykate New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2014
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Pueblo, Colorado, USA
    I traveled the whole Camino Sept -Oct 2014. I took 7 weeks which included a few days in Madrid before I started and added a few days in Santiago and Fisterra at the end.
    Ziplock bags are great for documents and the credential. A must!
    A very lightweight fitted twin size sheet treated with permethrium (sp?) (spray stuff to keep bugs away) is essential. I sprayed a few items (sleeping bag) and had no problem with bed bugs, plus the aubergues are very careful about any reports of bed bugs. I carried a ultra lightweight down sleeping bag that weighed less than a pound but only needed it for warmth in October. I may rethink taking it next time and just use the sheet and sarong.
    The rain cover for my backpack was useless! My pack got soaked as did my supposedly super raingear! that is a problem that must be solved before my next walk.
    Sportiva boots (buy a size larger) very lightweight and I am still wearing them after completing 650 km of the Camino. A pair of good flip flops (Vionic) that have great arch support and could be worn while walking around town.
    Look at Icebreaker for ultra light wool tee shirts, etc. wears well and dries fast. Dump the extra tee shirts and extra clothing. I had 1 skirt (might bring another skirt next time); 1 pair leggings; sarong; 1 icebreaker wool tank; 2 tee shirts; 3 pr underwear; 2 bras (I will take only 1 next time); 4 pr Wright socks (they are 2 layered socks so no need for liners); long sleeve Kuhl quick dry shirt; scarf; wide brim hat that can be crushed; rain jacket (got drenched in a 2 day rain); rain pants; ltwt gloves; bandanna (which I tied on the outside of my pack and used as a toilet wipe INSTEAD OF LEAVING WADS OF TOILET PAPER BEHIND THE BUSHES! DISGUSTING!) ; water bottle (refilled at every opportunity); basic toiletries.
    The best band aids are the "butterfly" fabric types, called knuckle or little finger bandages. they stay on, don't slip and protect! Couldn't find them in Spain so I'll bring plenty with me.
    I loved hiking in a Kuhl skirt. It had all sorts of zipper pockets. When it got chilly, I wore ultra lightweight smartwool leggings under the skirt. Even the rain pants served as an extra layer.
    A sarong! It served as a bathtowel, sheet, skirt, robe and shawl. A definite item for return trips.
    Headlamp w/led light. Next time, I will use the phone light and forget the headlamp.

    We called ahead for a bed in the next town and used the terrific bag transport service. My friend and I stuffed our extra clothes, toiletries, sandals, guide book (tore out needed pages for the day), etc in a nylon duffle, tied with a long scarf and sent that ahead. We each carried only what we needed for the day in our comfortable backpacks.
    Downside of that? Some days I wanted to walk farther, or stop earlier but was tied to a reservation and destination for my gear.
    I want to walk the Camino Frances again, possibly in 2016...then I am looking at Portugal or some other route out of France since we chose not to hike the Pyrenees on the first day, I would arrive in SJPP ready for the longer, tough walk.
     
  28. dt93103

    dt93103 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2015
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, CA
    IMG_2705.JPG
    Bought a Samsonite tote-a-lot on Amazon for $19.99, which will easily hold my Osprey Kestrel 38. Previously, I had a waist strap buckle get broken in transit, so this is cheap insurance. I'll probably leave it in SJPP since I won't care about the flight home.
     
    Woodchild likes this.
  29. Ernie G

    Ernie G Guest

    My wife and I are walking the camino with a mid August start.Can the back pack fully loaded fit in the overhead compartment on an airplane?
     
  30. raymond john

    raymond john Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2014
    Messages:
    495
    Likes Received:
    598
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Ernie
    In a word yes, provided the backpack do not exceed the Airline hand luggage dimensions and weight limits, Also excludes any liquids,over 100ml and Sharpe objects, etc. You should check this out with the Airline.
    I was going to do this last year and the only reasons which prevented me was that I had scissors in my medical kit and 2 small swiss knives. I arranged to have my back pack wrapped at the airport and put into the hold.

    I hope you find this info useful
    Buen Camino

    Raymond John
     
    Woodchild and danvo like this.
Loading...

Share This Page